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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 14, 1938, Image 36

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Drama and Music Blended
Neatly in ‘Stolen Heaven’
New Capitol Film Is Refreshing
And Novel—Phil Regan
Is Star of Stage Bill.
By HARRY Mar ARTHUR.
IT IS pleasant, indeed, to come upon a film that has something different
about 'it, a picture which does not sit itself down in one of the old,
well-worn grooves and slide easily along its way. Such a picture is
•‘Stolen Heaven,” the Capitol's new attraction, a novel and refreshing
blend of drama and fine music produced by the same man who brought
Gilbert and Sullivan to the screen in “The Girl Said No,” Mr. Andrew L. Stone.
When “The Girl Said No” turned out to be the unusual film it was,
Paramount handed Mr. Stone a pro-*&
aucers contract ana a iree rein ana
“Stolen Heaven” Is the result. It cer
tainly justifies Paramount’s confidence
in Mr. Stone, for it is an outstanding
photoplay in more ways than one. The
story of “Stolen Heaven” has novelty
on its side and the music is an integral
part of the action, woven into it with
complete naturalness. The faults of
the picture are Gene Raymond and
the fact that its appeal may be more
limited than popular.
“Stolen Heaven" is the story of a
pair of daring jewel thieves, who come
upon the hidden cottage of a once
famed pianist while in full flight
from a posse of gendarmes. It is an
Ideal hideout, so the two stay on,
building up the pianist’s confidence in
his fading memory to give them a good
excuse for remaining. Comes the day
of the pianist’s comeback at a music
festival, the day the thieves are set
to make for the border. But the
young lady in the case has a change
of heart, can’t leave the pianist be
cause she knows he needs her, can't
play a selection through without some
one to jog his memory.
The finale of all this is a fine bit of
hokum, from the grade A hokum bar
rel, but it is well distilled and clicks
the way it is supposed to. Because
the film has been so capably turned
up to this point it even seems believ
able when the young Jewel thief, who
has abandoned the girl, grabs his fid
dle case when he hears the pianist
fumbling and ad-libbing in the middle
of “Liebestraum” and returns to give
him the melody, in the face of sure
arrest. There may be cliches bouncing
about here and there and the people
may behave every time the way you
have come to expect them to behave in
a motion picture, but “Stolen Heaven”
is a novel diversion anyhow. .
* * * *
J^JUSICALLY the picture is a treat.
Not one number is dragged in
by the heels and every selection, being
where it belongs, is a splendid accom
paniment for the mood of the mo
ment, The story permits the intro
duction of a Strauss medley, Liszt’s
“Sixth Hungarian Rhapsody” and his
“Second Hungarian Rhapsody,” a
Chopin waltz, and finally a top-notch
festival version of “Liebestraum,” with
piano, a chorus and a full orchestra
blended into the arrangement. It all
Is music brought to the screen the way
fine music should be brought to the
screen and it helps no end to make
the story a heart-warming entertain
ment.
The principal players are Olympe
Bradna (the name sounds familiar>.
Lewis Stone, Glenda Farrell and Gene
Raymond, with the accent on Miss
Deanna Durbin Film
Stays On at Keith’s.
'J'HE public has taken to Deanna
Durbin’s “Mad About Music” in <
a manner which is a true delight to
every one who has been raving about
the young lady since her first picture
first was shown, and the film stays on
now for a third week at R-K-O
Keith's. This is, of course, as it should
be, for “Mad About Music” is one of
the season's truly delightful screen
diversions. Its story is a pleasant
fabrication that tugs at the heart
strings, its music is music that is
pleasant to hear and its star is in
better voice than ever before, and per
haps an improved actress.
It matters not that you know full:
well that the story of “Mad About1
Music” is pure hokum, for it Is so
skillfully done you almost believe it.
The yam about a little girl in board
ing school who is driven into produc
ing a ficticious father about whom she
has been boasting is aimed right at
the heart and it certainly hits its
mark. It all goes along the way you
know It will and it ends the way you
know it will, but Miss Durbin and her
fellow players—principally Herbert
Marshall and Gail Patrick—make it
seem like something important and
more than once there will be room for
nothing in your heart and mind but
sympathy for a little girl in a large
predicament.
The musical embellishments, of
course, are a large part of “Mad About
Music,“ for the cinema offers few
greater pleasures than listening to
Deanna Durbin lift that clear, sweet,
emotion-filled soprano in song and
start a thirll chasing up your spine.
Here she sings “I Like to Whistle,"
“Serenade to the Stars,” “Chapel Bells”
and scores her greatest singing triumph
of the picture in an austerely staged
and beautifully sung version of “Ave
Maria,” with the accompaniment of
the Vienna Boys’ Choir. So it’s an
other hit on the records for the young
lady who Is practically Universal’s
sole support. H. M.
Farce Is Planned
By Geramistians.
'T'HE Holy Comforter Ceramistians
will present "Wedding Spells,” a
new romance farce, May 16 and 17,
In the Holy Comforter School Audi
torium, Fifteenth and East Capitol
•treets.
The cast includes Helen Schumm,
Frances Devlin, Margaret Murray,
Helen Frank, Mary Werner, Jane
Ooucher, Margaret Berckmann, Earle
Martyn, J. B. Murphy, Joseph Kar
jlcek, Jesse A. Mann and Christopher
Murphy.
The cast is rehearsing every evening,
tinder the direction of Francis E.
Blake.
i
eholoe (election
I a lorn (tack. Enjoy
I corlnn.
m Morrliof* taper Co.
DINNER DANCING ==*,
iWKSSStMStSuSmSmmmmdJLmm
k
Bradna, Mr. Stone and Miss Farrell.
Miss Bradna handles her first starring
role with considerable competehce.
She is a convincing actress, has a
singing voice which falls sweetly upon
the ear, her dancing is graceful and
light as a spring breeze and her in
gratiating personality is far warmer
than some of the breezes we have had
the past few days. She does just as
well by ‘‘Stolen Heaven” as it does
by her, which is very well, Indeed.
Mr. Stone, in one of the best roles
he has had in a while, plays the pianist
with both the feeling and the convic
tion which help make that climax a
logical one; Miss Farrell adds comedy
relief in fine fashion and Porter Hall
contributes his bit. Mr. Raymond is
in the picture.
* * * *
QN THE Capitol's stage this week
you will find several excellent per
formers: you will find, in fact, that
every one on the stage bill is at or
near the top in his or her own par
ticular field. You will find the head
liner. Mr. Phil Regan, in fine voice and
by this time, no doubt, singing his
heart out right down as close to the
front row as he can get. Yesterday,
no matter how well he sang "One
Song.” “I Can Dream, Can't I?" a
couple of other tunes, and, of course,
“Irish Eyes,” he was no end unhappy
about having been planted way up
on the stage instead of down on the
runway, close to the people he took
this personal appearance tour to see.
He should know it is a treat to hear
him sing whether he is on the stage
or in the last row of the balcony, and
so should you.
There also is Comedienne Sibyl
Bowman, who has come back to town
this time with some new sketches and
some of the old favorites, all of them
being something like riotous fun. All
of them, that is, but the impersonation
of a faded film star, which is a dra
matic moment, full of pathos. Of the
others you will like best, perhaps, the
large and formidable priraa donna and
that famous take-off of Mrs. Roosevelt
at the Girl Scout meeting.
For more comedy there are Carroll
and Howe, whose material is bright
and whose manner of presenting it is
fresh and witty; for dancing there is
Betty Bruce, whose sophisticated taps
are top-notch and rank her as a lass
who is going places; to start things
off with a bang there are the Robbins,
whose acrobatics are fast and differ
ent. And for a musical moment Phil
lampkin has another of these classic
swing overtures (this one performed
right in the middle of the stage show,
so help us), the subject of the sweet
or hot debate this time being “Annie
Laurie.”
Thomas Item Tops
Trans-Lux Bill.
'pHE latest edition of Lowell Thomas'
“Going Places" featurette consti
tutes the most interesting item on the
Trans-Lux bill this week. One can
listen to Mr. Thomas' voice for more
than a few minutes without becom
ing bored, and he has a pair of par
ticularly interesting subjects to talk 1
about this time. These two outstand- |
ing sequences deal with the manu- !
facture of flexible fabrics from spun
glass and pearl culture, with empha
sis upon Mikimoto, who is recognized !
as No. 1 man in that line.
The camera has caught ancient :
and modern modes of life in jux
taposition in Singapore, and the shots
have been edited into an attractive
travelogue, “Crossroads of the Orient,” |
filmed in color. The other short
subjects are “In the Swim,” pictur
ing almost every possible diving ma
neuver demonstrated by Olympic
champions w'ith slow-motion being
utilized extensively, and “The Moth
and the Flame,” a Disney cartoon
dealing with love, devotion and peril
in the insect world.
. Preparedness is emphasized in the
news department of the program with
air operations over New York City
and the rushing of construction work
on submarines being shown. Among
the clips chosen from the product of
all newsreel companies are those pic
turing a night preview of the New
York World's Fair, the new Linbergh
home in Brittany, the debate over
saving the life of a Chicago baby
with an eye affliction, summer fash
ions, Louis and Schmeling signing
for their bout, Cleveland’s food crisis,
planting rice by plane, safety drive in
the District schools. C. A. M.
‘Test Pilot’ Thrills
For a Third Week.
'J'HERE seems to be a ready market
for thrills these days and excite
ment up among the clouds, for “Test
Pilot" now embarks upon a third week
at Loew’s Palace. There are thrills and
excitement aplenty in “Test Pilot,"
too; performances by airplanes and
cameramen which dwarf the per
formances of Spencer Tracy, Myma
Loy and Clark Gable, good as those
latter performances are.
It Is no real cause for complaint that
the story of "Test Pilot" lags consid
erably every time it settles down on the
ground, for, just as you are about
either to give up or to start praying
for something to happen, it happens.
Director Victor Fleming does not keep
his cameras on the ground for long at
any one time, and when he takes them
in the air he provides some of the
most thrilling moments the screen has
presented in many a season.
It is no matter, either, that you
know for sure some of the exciting
airplane shots could have been made
no way but by trickery. When Clark
Gable, for instance, rips the wings off
a pursuit ship in a terminal-velocity
dive you are not thinking how the
shots were made, but you are sitting
on the edge of the seat wondering how
in the world he is ever going to fight
his way out against the slipstream and
save himself. When his motor conks
out in a storm and he dives into clouds
with a dead stick you will sigh with
relief Just as though you were right
there in the plane as the clouds open
to show a field below. They’re tricks,
maybe, but they are mighty fine tricks.
Mr. Spencer Tracy also has a few
tricks up his sleeve, stealing scene
after scene from Miss Loy, Mr. Gable
and even Lionel Barrymore, getting
more out of his role than ever was
written into it H. M.
i
On the Open Road
Things are not ahoays calm, it seems. For “Tip-Off Girls,"
in which this attractive person known as Mary Carlisle is co
starred with Lloyd Nolan, treats of people who rob* trucks on the
highicay. It is the current screen attraction at the Metropolitan
Theater.
Little Words and Lights
That Make Hollywood
Film Ogre Karloff Eating Angel Cake,
Just a Sample of What Goes
On in Real Life.
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD. May 14 (N.A.N.A.).—Seen and heard: "In our town” ...
Eleanor Powell, in a cellophane grass skirt, scratching her leg and
telling the director how she wants her number arranged . . . Clark
Gable telling a bunch of extras. "This is the biggest bomb to hit
Shanghai—the big apple” . . . Maureen O'Sullivan knitting a blue mesh
sweater "to match Johnny’s eyes” . . . Screen Monster Boris Karloff at the
Brown Derby munching angel cake .. .<•-—
; spring ayington at ner chiropodist s
' trying to park her large auto in 3
feet of space—
and controlling
| her temper . . .
Sonja Henie
memorizing her
lines aloud , . .
Darryl Zanuck
doing his daily
workout with
Fidel La Barba
. , . Expectant
Mother Joan
Blondell walking
her small son
along the Mal
ibu Beach . . .
: Groucho Mark
j telling this writer.
Sheilah Graham.
"We start butchering 'Room Service'
in six weeks."
* * * *
George Raft in a 12-inch boat'about
to be dashed to pieces against a 3-foot
iceberg. Raft is a doll, the Iceberg a
miniature, in Paramount's "Spawn of
the North" ... An extra aristocrat,
and an extra member of the masses,
staging a private revolution on the
“Marie Antoinette” set . . . Carl
Laemmle, jr., at the party celebrating I
his 30th birthday anniversary, "The ;
only way I can get to see my friends
is to give a party" . . . Jimmy Stewart
wandering through the streets at ;
M-G-M, sucking an ice cream cone j
. . . Loretta Young, in her dressing ;
room, wearing a magnifK nt evening
gown and old bedroom slippers . . .
Mrs. Jock Whitney arm-in-arming it
with Writer Helen Meinardi at the
"Vivacious Lady” preview. Both girls
hatless, but Mrs. Whitney in a mag
nificent mink fur coat.
* * * *
Dashiell Hammett telling Dorothy
Parker, "Directly I finish one story,
I always start another. Today I fin
ished the third ‘Thin Man,’ and imme
diately started the fourth.” "The
'Invisible Man,’ I suppose.” quips Miss
Parker . . . Robert Benchley peeved
with the trade paper that printed Bob
did not have children, so how could
he make the short, "How to Raise a
Baby"? (Mr. Benchley is the proud
father of two bouncing boys—the eldest
a literary light at Harvard) . . . Luise
Ranier in mink coat (present from her
husband), beanie on her head, a plump
woman friend on each arm, shop
gazing on Hollywood boulevard. She
flaunts a sun-burned nose, minus
make-up, and having a wonderful
time. A girl, distributing free chewing
gum, waylays her and asks, "Aren’t
you Miss Rainer?" "Give me a piece
of chewing gum,” says Luise.' (The
girl is still suffering from shock.)
T T T ^
Joan Crawford sun-tanning with a
mixture of oil and vinegar ... At the
Trocadero. Jack Benny with his
cigar. George Burns without his
Grade. A1 Jolson without his Ruby.
At the next table, Antonio Moreno,
remember him? He is now a real
estate biggie . . . Director Robert Z.
Leonard, at the drug store, buying
two bottles of 200-year-old wine—for
(33 ... Claire Trevor, at the Columbia
Square opening, complaining, “Too
many people here” . . . Helen Brod
erick telling every one on the set,
“Come and sit in Louis Hayward’s
chair, and you’ll rise with a British
accent” .. . Billie Burke stating, “All
children over 3 are problem children”
. . . Frank Morgan telling your cor
respondent, “The only thing I’m get
ting out of my yacht is a red nose—
and that tired feeling."
(Copyright, 1938. by the North Amerlcin
Newspaper Alliance, Inc.)
Blackfriars Guild
Social Tomorrow.
TPHE Blackfriars’ Guild will hold its
fifth social of the year tomorrow
evening at 8:30 o'clock in the music
hall of Catholic University. Guest
speaker will be Dr. Robert J. Slavin,
O. P., who will speak on “The Art and
Principles of Morality.” Included in
the program is a one-act play “Wursel
Flummery,” by A. A. Milne. The play
is directed by Edgar Ford and the cast
includes Joseph O’Connor, Gordon'
Potter, Adah May Brady, Margaret
Trodden and Jullen Zier.
L
Auto Thrills
Packed Into
Melodrama
--
Metropolitan Film
Tells of Modern
Highwaymen.
THE program currently being of
fered at the Metropolitan The
ater has been designed to pro
vide an exhaustive test of the
amount of strain that can be trans
mitted through the eyes to the heart
without occasioning tragic conse
quences. for to a feature surfeited with
skidding automobiles and trucks has
been added a short subject which packs
a series of disasters intended to leave
the viewer quite limp and fulfilling
ijs purpose in more than adequate
style.
The feature picture is "Tip-Off
Girls," and it deals with the people
who roam about waylaying interstate
trucks and stealing their cargoes. One
is disposed to eschew night-time driv
ing on the open road in the future
after witnessing the succession of dar
ing motor vehicle maneuvers that has
been incorporated into this opus, but
even if all this wild activity is not a
nightly occurrence on the Nation’s
principal highways, the film is an ac
ceptable entertainment item for all
who enjoy action on the screen and
don’t care whether or not many syl
lables are tossed to and fro.
Mary Carlisle and Lloyd Nolan are
the stars, and they perform their act
ing tasks with sufficient skill, but, al
though Mr. Nolan is a G-man this
time, one waits for him to be revealed
as an ally of the thugs or for him to
quit the service. Mr. Nolan is not so
revealed nor does he go over to the
other side, and he performs naturally
as a servant of law and order, so there
is little point in starting an argu
ment about it. J. Carrol Naish plays
the boss of the hijackers to good effect,
and Larry Buster Crabbe is a capable
assistant. Roscoe Karns, Evelyn Brent
and Benny Baker offer supporting
work of merit.
"Tip-Off Girls" is unimportant, but
is swift-moving screen melodrama,
and screeching rubber tires and swerv
ing automobiles still pack a wallop.
There is a slug-fest in that line on
the Metropolitan screen this week.
C. A. M.
‘In Old Chicago’ Stays
Another Week. %
'S nothing more to be said
aoout Mr. Darryl Zanuck’s “In
Old Chicago." The picture now is in
its second week at the Columbia, Its
fourth week on F street, and if that
sort of box office reaction does not
convince you it is worth seeing, nothing
said here could convince you.'
“In Old Chicago” is worth seeing
principally for the blase Mr. Zanuck
and his cohorts have stirred up in
“the patch” and sent sweeping over
a city, for it is spectacle at its best,
one of the most exciting of the stirring
moments conjured up by Hollywood's
wonder-working special effects men.
Other reasons for seeing the film
are Alice Brady’s splendid perform
ance as the Mrs. O’Leary, whose cow
is blamed for it all, and Don Ameche,
who is always convincing as the better
of the O’Leary sons. The fictionalized
version of Chicago’s history, upon
which Mr. Zanuck has hung his con
flagration, is diverting enough to hold
your attention until the sparks fly
and Tyrone Power and Alice Faye are
almost as good as the story.
AMUSEMENTS.
VB1US.T.VTV 'IMA*
L
Wayne King’s Music
Feature at Earle
_ _
‘The Beloved Brat’ Plays
Secondary Role on •
Program.
By ROBERT B. PHILLIPS, Jr.
WAYNE KINO, whose dulcet music has melted more hearts than a
blast furnace, turns on his gentle technique at will on the Earle
stage this week, offering respite from “Jam” sessions, relaxation
to the weary whose lives are lived in anything but waits time, and
altogether a top-notch band revue. His is the No. 1 spot on the entertainment
bill, a picture named "The Beloved Brat,” playing second fiddle (not ln.Mr.
King’s band, however). 6-—— —
With the King music one is of
fered the excellent dancing of Gower
and Jeanne a bright ventriloquist's turn
presenting Robert Neller and Dizzy
Dugan, the standard rough-and-tum
ble turn known as Ames and Arno,
and the King Choristers, who give
“The Rosary” a novel workout, even
if you won't believe that one until
you hear It yourself.
Central figure of “The Beloved
Brat” is Bonita Granville, who threw
a new kind of acid Into .the moppet
business when she played the despi
cable little girl In “These Three.”
Working along the same lines of low
endeavor, she portrays in this pic
ture a child who has been neglected
by parents, mistreated by governesses
and servants, converted Into a rather
Inspired hellion. Her energetic work
before the camera keeps the character
ization vividly alive, but the picture Is
still another member of good old class
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—"The Star Wagon,” by
Maxwell Anderson, and with Burgess
Meredith: 2:30 and 8:30 p.m,
Earle—"Beloved Brat,” Meanie Bo
nita Granville in her first starring
role: 10:30 a.m., 12:45, 3:05, 5:25,
7:40 and 10 p.m. Stage shows: 11:50
am., 2:05, 4:25, 6:45 and 9:05 pm.
Capitol—“Stolen Heaven,” in Which
Miss Bradna gets kissed by Gene Ray
mond: 11 am., 1:40, 4:25, 7:10 and
10 p.m. Stage shows: 12:40, 3:30,
6:15 and 9 p.m.
Metropolitan—“Tip-Off Girls,” all
about the highway hijacking racket:
11 am., 12:45, 2:35, 4:25, 6:15, 8:05
and 9:55 p.m.
Palace—"Test Pilot.” Gable, Loy,
Tracy in a sky thriller: 11:15 am.,
1:50, 4:25, 7 and 9:35 p.m.
Columbia—'“In Old Chicago.” Mr
Zanuck's spectacle starring the great
fire: 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:10 and
9:40 p.m.
Keith’s — “Mad About Music,”
Deanna Durbin sings: 11:15 a.m., 1:20,
3:25, 5:30, 7:35 and 9:40 p.m.
Belasco—"The Girl Was Young,”
Nova Pilbeam's latest: 1:50, 4:40,
6:25, 8:15 and 10 p.m.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts. Con
tinuous from 10 am. to midnight.
LitUe—“Maytime,” the MacDonald
Eddy musical revived again: 11:40
a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 6:55 and 9:20 p.m.
Twizzler Answer.
You can use the digit 8 eight times
to get a thousand. Here's how: 888
plus 88 plus 8 plus 8 plus 8 equals
1,000.
Origin of ‘Grudge.’
The word “grudge” was once spelled
“grutch,” meaning to murmur or
grumble.
_ AMUSEMENTS.
3 rd WEEK..!
DEANNA DURBIN
"MAD about MUSIC'
WltN
HERBERT MARSHALL
GAIL PATRICK • ARTHUR
TREACHER e Wm. FRAWLEY
OUJ.. WALT DISNEY cartoon
"DONALD’S NEPHEWS"
GINGERROGERS
JAMES STEWART
in a price lees picture
of youth in love . . I
"Vivacious Lady"
Ginger goea thru college
but not the way you .think
On tho Bay Ono Hour Drioo
Opens Today
Mile Boardwalk and Pier
Amusements—Free Parking
Fminl Dally But Service Dm
40* lllb St. NW.
INrOBMATION. NATIONAL lit It
(
B, brightened by a slightly novel twist.
As a social study, it has almost as
much scope as a survey of the antics at
the Colony Club, since no appreciable
portion of American childhood is
threatened with worry about the prob
lems of butlers and governesses.
Aside from Miss Granville’s expert
playing, the picture offers the reliable
talents of Donald Crisp and Natalie
Moorhead as her parents, Dolores Cos
tello as the head of a reform school
where "the beloved brat” is incar
cerated for a ahor^time (and if that is
jail, quick, Watson, take a shot at
somebody), Donald Briggs in a minor
role.
Since he is always an important
factor in any bill of fare around the
show shops, must mention that Pop
eye tangles with some new foes in an
Earle short subject and that you may
see the ladies’ races at Pimlico in the
newsreel.
Chanters to Give
Spring Concert.
COMPLETING the 13th year of
choral singing, the Chevy Chase
Chanters, under the direction of J.
Horace Smithey, will give the annual
spring concert on Tuesday evening,
May 17, at the new Interior De
partment Auditorium.
This popular group of 30 male
singers, composed of professional and
business men, whose avocation is
music,^ and including in its member
ship soloists and directors of church
choirs, is well known to Washington
and Baltimore audiences through its
programs on the air and before busi
ness and civic organizations.
Assisting the Chanters will be John
Alden Pinckel, cellist, and Alice
Finckel, pianist. Mr. and Mrs. Finckel
have Just returned from a concert
tour over a large portion of the
United States, one of the high lights
of which was their recent perform
ance at Town Hall in New York.
_ AMUSEMENTS.
on Acnn opposite
DlUhmjU white house
i»hfciivww xAt. 0149_
7t*>\>a iPti&eam
I .i
CONTIM OI S 2 TO 11:30 !■ M.
2 DAY & MTE
1 PM. •TIL MIDN1TE
THE USUAL MORE THAN
FIFTY FEATURES
DANCE TO THE
RAY HERRECK
HIT BAYD
9 TO 12 TONIGHT
S«U the opening Moonlite Cruise of the
ROBERT E. LEE, Washington’s newest, mod
ern, oil-burning steamer. Largest dance floor
aboard any Atlantic Seaboard resseL
1-PIECE SWING BAND REFRESHMENTS
FREE DANCING AND PARKING
Lots of Free Parking Space at Our Docks
TOMORROW (SMdiy)—2:30 P. N. ti 1:30 t. N.
4 hours of Daylight Cruise-Danc
ing. Bring the whole family and
enjoy a real cruise on this roomy,
glass-enclosed steamer.
ADULTS CHILDREN
50c 25c
.U-^ --:— -:- —1
L
Lovette Choral Club
Is Heard in Varied
Spring Concert!
By ALICE EVERSMAN.
A. LARGE audience assembled last
evening In the Italian Garden of
the Mayflower Hotel to hear the elev
enth annual spring concert of the
Lovette Choral Club, Eva Whltford
Lovette director. The club was assist
ed by Hazel Cake, soprano, and Milton
Schwartz, violinist, who was accom
panied by Sol Sax. Some of the num
bers sung by the group were directed
by Franclse Bass Wilson, assistant
director.
The tonal quality which the club
achieves is remarkably sweet and pure
and the pitch is true except when the
sopranos reach to the highest register,
but since the selections were well cho
sen to suit the range of the voices
this happened only rarely. The vocal
sections of the group are equally bal
anced, so that the interharmony
brings a fine matching of tonal color.
The diction is clear and feeling for
shadings well accentuated.
The varied program opened with
“Salutation,” by Samuel Ricard
Grimes, which is dedicated to the Na
tional Federation of Music Clubs, and
which the club sang recently at the
banquet during Music Week. It was
immediately followed by an excerpt
from Purcell’s cantata, “The Moon";
an old Scottish cradle song, “O, Can
Ye Sew Cushions?” and another inter
esting Scottish air, “Wi’ a Hundred
Pipers.”
Other outstanding numbers were
“The Lotus Flower,” Schumann-Claas
sen; the “Bridal Chorus” from the
“Rose Maiden,” by Sir Frederic Cow
an, and Stebbins' arrangement of
Grieg’s "A Swan.” Hageman's “Christ
Went Up Into the Hills” was excellent
ly sung, with incidental solo by Phebe
Stine, soprano. A charming novelty of
the program was “Bird Song,” by
Pearl Curhm, sung by the group, with
a trio composed of Carolyn Schulte,
Francise Bass Wilson and Violet
Hobbs. The concluding numbers were
the "Pilgrims’ Chorus,” from Tann
hauser, and the “Waltz,” from “Faust.”
In her solo selections, Mrs. Cake
disclosed a sweet voice with an un
usually clear, ringing quality in the
upper register. Her first number was
the “Hear Ye, Israel” aria from Men
delssohn’s "Elijah” and later in the
AMUSEMENTS.
5 SHOWS TODAY—WAYNE KING
AT 11:50 — 2:05 — 4:25 — 6:40 — 9
A Warner Bros Drama
On Stage
J WAYNE KING tREVUE
i
BMW EMMY » “Hi Mwrtns 01MMIIWOO"
VTIP-OFF GIRLS
A Paramount Picture with
MAKY CARUSIE * LLOYD NOWjJ>
2 I ti 5:38 P.H-—25c I i-2
program she sang Henschel’s "Morn
ing Hymn,” Easthope Martin’s "Harp
of the Woodlands” from "The Love
Spell” and LaForge’s "Hills.” Brought #
back by the generous applause, Mrs.
Cake gave "Shadows” as encore, sing
ing It with many delightful little
nuances to emphasize its meaning.
Beginning with the famous “Air on
the G String” by Bach. Mr. Schwarti
won his.audience by the lovely qual
ity of his tone and his skillful tech
nique, which came amply to the
fore in the Dvorak-ICreisler "Slavonio
Dance in E Minor” which followed. I
He had a most sympathetic accom
panist in Mr. Sax for these and '
the two numbers of his second group,
Kreisler’s “La Gitana” and Hubay’s
"Hejre Kati.”
The accompanist for the Choral
Club and for Mrs. Cake was Elsie
Cramer. The club, which is the out
growth of a group organized in 1925
by the late Dr. Thomas Lovette, is
named in memory of him.
AMUSEMENTS.
LAST TWO TIMES
Today at 2:30 Tontaht 8:30 —.
The III Sr,.~c““K
STAR-WAGON
BN*W Play by
MAXWEU anDEISOm
BURGESS . LILLIAN
MEREDITH GISH
■vet.—50c. *1.00. *! .50. *2.00. *2.50
Matt. 50c. *1.00. *1.50. *2.00 (plot tax)
NEXT WEEK!
Matinees Wed. and Sat.
3 The World Famous
ABBEY
THEATRE '
PLAYERS
From Dublin. Ireland. j
8 daily change of bill.
Ey*«.: Orchestra. *2.2<n 1st Bale.. *I SJ.
*1.10; 2nd Bair.. SSc.
Matinees: Orchestra. (1.65; 1st Balt..
11.101 2nd Bale.. SSc find. taxi....
_—SEAT SALE NOW—_
l»l«l__
~T NOW
GENE RAYMOND
OLYMPE BRADNA
STOLEN"HEAVEN
■ —-"*■ Slat* ■■■■ —*
Marry May Frolic «tb
Phil REGAN m»*w
othar acts
f i»ow/3roweek n
1.1 GiaAJk. Oift/A** !■
I GABLE * LOY I
11 SPENCER TRACY if
I .
!•«» ICm«l«Ullt CttMt 'M
A. By Tit Kmiirti tl MARCO ROLO HP
^SSB^SL
\ I IN OLD CHICAGO"
V I with TYRONE POWER
V I Alie* Fay* * Don Amceh*
1 I _and 4 th thrilling episode
"THE LOWE RANGER
ACADEMY 0fP"Mn?^roD,*T
E. Lawrence Phillips* Theatre Beautiful
Continuous From 1:00 P.M.
“NIGHT CLUB SCANDAL,”
With JOHN BARRYMORE.
“ADVENTURE’S END,”
_With_JOHN_ WAYNE._
CAROLINA Air-Conditioned
MADELEINE CARROLL m "ITS ALL
YOURS." and JTHE WILDCATTER ”
riDri C Penna. Ave. at 21st St.
UIVULL Home of Mirroohonir Sound
Matinees Tues.. Thurs., Sat.. Sun.
FREDDIE BARTHOLOMEW. SPENCER
TRACY. LIONEL BARRYMORE. "CAP
TAINS COURAGEOUS."_
DUMBARTON 1 ^rK d i tlnn r d
! CHARI.ES STARRETT and IRIS MERE
DITH in "CATTLE RAIDERS ' Chap
ter No. 2 "THE PAINTED STALLION."
1 Also Comegies.__
PA Iff! AWN ANACOSTIA. D. C.
rAIKLATVIl Air-Conditioned
JOHN WAYNE. "BORN TO THE WEST.'1
rONTOPCC Nichols Ave. A
lUnuRtM Portland St. S.E.
JANE WITHERS In "CHECKERS."
linn 3221 M St N.W
LallAs Double Feature
NOAH BERRY. Jr.: CHARLES HUGHES in
"TROUBLE AT MIDNIGHT." LAUREL
and HARDY in "WAY OUT WEST."
Cartoon.‘
I ITTI P 608 9th St. N.W.
lal 1 1 lab Air-Conditioned
JEANETTE MacDONALD* NELSON EDDY,
“MAYTIME.”
Sun.—"RUGQLES OF RED GAP."_
DD1NPPCC 1119 H St. N.E.
iKlIlbbOu Double Feature
CHARLES QUIGLEY in "THE GAME
THAT KILLS." BUCK JONES in
"SUDDEN BILL DORN __
CPrh 8244 Georela Ave.
uCLU Silver Sprint. Md
JONES FAMILY in "LOVE ON A BUD
GET." Also CHARLES STARRETT in
"OUTLAWS OF THE PRAIRIE.' C'hap
_ter 3. "Radio Patrol." Cont. from 1 P.M.
CTANTAN 6th and C Sts. N.E.
dlAPliUn Finest Sound Euutpment
Continuous From 1:00 P.M.
“FLIGHT FROM GLORY,”
With CHESTER MORRIS.
BOB STEELE in
“LAST OF THE WARRENS.”
TAN All A 4 th and Butternut Sts.
lAKUIllA No Parkins Troubles
Continuous From 1:00 P.M.
JACKIE COOPER in
“BOY OF THE STREETS.”
DONALD CRISP.
“SERGEANT MURPHY.”_
HIPPODROME Double Feature
Anna May Wong. "Daughter of
Shanghai.” Clark Gable, "Call of
_the Wild.”___.___
o 1 urn MT RAINIER. MD.
lAINEiU Double Feature
Glenn Morris. "Tarzan’s Revenge."
Tex Ritter. "Frontier Town."
_Mat inee—Cont. 1-11 P.M._
a DP a nr BVATT8VILLE. MD.
AKLAUb Double Feature .
Dick Foran. "Devil’s Saddle Legion."
Eleanore Whitr.ey, "Thrill of a
Lifetime." . ,,
Matinee—Cont, 1-11 PM.
RICHMOND *“*«?*• VA“
Bette Davis. "Jezebel.”
REED
Joan Blondell. "There’s Always a
Woman.” ___
Free Parking Space—800 Cars.
Completely Air-Conditioned.
UIT A ROCKVILLE. MD.
miLU Double Feature
Virginia Bruce. "Arsene Lupin Re
turns.’/ Jack Luden. “Stagecoach
Matinee—Cont. 3*11 PM
Completely Air-Conditioned.
UADI DAD A Upper Marlboro. Md.
fflAKLDUKU Double Feature
Dick Foran. "Over the Wall.” Chas.
Starrett, "One-Man Justice.”
;_Matinee—Cont, ~-11 P.M.
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
ST ATP NO PARKING | CP
31A 1E. WORRIES .I'LL
MacDONALD and I JOHN BARRYMORE
EDDY In "GIRL I in "BULLDOG
OF THE GOLDEN I DRUMMOND'S
WEST."_I_PERIL."
ARLINGTON, VA.
WILSON Ovn?Colonial Vitiate I
"SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN
DWARFS."
ASHTON CUrandan. Va.
DICK PURCELL is "DAREDEVIL DRIVES.”
*5
K .
C* O
e
K.
*
o
Co
IS
£Q
**• o
31
*5
wO.
o
k.
AMBASSADOR
ALICE FAYE FRED ALLEN la
■ SALLY, IRENE AND MARY." At ii.
3:55, 5:55. 7:55. 9:55. Cartoon.
A DAI I A H St. N.E
ftrULLU Li. 3375 Open I P.M.
JACKIE COOPER ill "BOY' OF THB
STREETS " At 1. 3:55. 5:50. 9:50. *
PRESTON FOSTER in "DOUBLE
JJANGER.^_At 2:20, 4:50, 7:45.
AVAION 3613 Conn Ave. K~W.
A V ALU1I Cl. 2000. Open 1 P.M.
JANE WITHERS. STUART ERWIN in
"CHECKERS." At 1:40. 3:40. 5:40.
7:40. 9:40. Edgar Kennedy Comedy,
Cartoon. Pete Smith Short.
AVE. GRAND
WILLIAM POWELL. ANNABELLA in
“BARONESS AND THE BUTLFR. At
3.55. 6:50. 9:50. NAN GREY in *
•■RECKLESS LIVING." At 2:35,5:30.
8:30._Cartoon.___
fAI VFRT 2324 Wisconsin AveT
TV"*r, * Cl. 2345. Mat. 1 P.M.
LEWIS STONE. MICKEY ROONEY in
,JGPGE, HARDY S CHILDREN." At
1.30. 3:45, 5:55. 7:50. 9:40,
TFNTRAI „423 9th st- n.w.
V,. Met. 2811 Open 11 am.
WARDEN LEWIS E LAWES "OVER
THE WALL." At 11:40. 1:20. 3 05.
4.45, 6:2o. 8:10. 9:50._Shorts.
roi ONY 4933 Ga- Ave. N W
LWLU111 Geo. 6500. Mat. 1 P.M.
GLAD Y S GEORGE. FRANCHOT
TONE in "LOVE IS A HEADACHE."
At 1:50. 3:55 6:05. 7:5579:45._
HOMF .. 1239 c s‘- n.e.
nUlTlC. AH. 8188. Mat. 1 P.M.
EDITH, FELLOWS. LEO CARRILLO in
LITTLE MISS ROUGHNECK ' At
1- 4; T- 10. ALLAN LANE and
JOAN WOODBURY in NIGHT
SPOT.” At 2:45. 5:45. 8 50.
Cartoon._ •
PFNN . • 639 Pa- Avenue S.E.
1 Ellin Line. 2179. Mat. 1 P.M.
VIRGINIA BRUCE. ROBERT MONT
GOMERY in “FIRST ONE-HUND
RED YEARS.” At 1:55. 4. 6 05,
7:55. 9:45. “Flash Gordon g Tns>
to Mars." No. 2.
^AVflY 3030 >«•» st. N.W
uHIuI Col. 4968. Mat. 1 P.M.
W C. FIELDS, MARTHA RAYE in
"BIG BROADCAST OF 3 938." A*
1:15 3:20 5:30. 7:35._9:45._
SHERIDAN feslaaMSi!
"THE KID COMES BACK." with
WAYNE MORRIS. At 1:30. 3:50.
6:10. B. 9:50. "Lone Ranger," No. 1.
TIVni I 14th st * Park Rd. N.W*
1IVUL1 Col. 1800 Mat. I P M.
VIRGINIA BRUCE. ROBERT MONT
GOMERY in "FIRST ONE HUNDRED '
YEARS." At 3:55. 4:05. 6:10, 7:50.
0:45. "Lone Ranger." No. 2.
UPTOWN Conn. Ave. and Newark
UriUWn Clrv. 5100. Mat. 1 P.M.
VIRGINIA BRUCE. ROBERT MONT- A
GOMERY in "FIRST ONE HUNDRED
YEARS" At 1:55. 4. 6:10. 7:55.
9:40._"Lon» Ranger." No. 2. Comedy.
VDDV Ga. Avr. and Quebec Place
I UK!! Ra. 1400. Mat. 1 P.M.
JOE E. BROWN in "WIDE OPEN
FACES.” At 1. 2:55, 4:55. 6:30,
8:10. 0:45. Quintuplet Short.
NEWTON
Double Feature.
"BULLDOG DRUMMOND'S PERIL." .
JOHN BARRYMORE. LOUISE
CAMPBELL. “WIDE OPEN FACES."
JOE E. BROWN. JANE WYMAN.
_Matinee at 1 P.M._
JESSE THEATER
_Double Feature.
"TRIP TO PARIS." JONE8 FAMILY.
RAW HIDE." SMITH BALLEW.
EVELYN KNAPP.
_Matinee at 1 P.M._
SYLVAN * ^avS.’n.w.l
Double Feature.
"LOVE ON A BUDGET." THE JONES
FAMILY. "SWING YOUR LADY.”
HUMPHREY BOGART, COUISE
PAZENDA.
_Matinee at 1 P.M._
PALM THEATER DELVARAT'
“REBECCA OF SUNNY
BROOK FARM,”
SHIRLEY TEMPLE, RANDOLPH
_SCOTT. Mat, at 1 P.M.
STATE-BETHESDA $£
' DON TERRY in
“SQUADRON OF HONOR.” •
Shown at 1:45. 4:40. 7:10. 10:05.
RONALD REAGAN in
“SERGEANT MURPHY.”
Shown at 3, 5:55. 8:50.
NEWS arid CARTOON.

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