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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 23, 1938, Image 13

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Premier, Before Commons,
Tells of Arrangement
for Peace Move.
BACKGROUND—
Czechoslovak-German tension
"heightened as result of killing of
two Sudeten Germans by Czech
border guards Saturday on eve of
Czechoslovakian municipal elec
tions. Czechs also increased armed
forces to half million by calling re
serves. Troops reinforced border
and were stationed through Sude
ten German areas, where disorders
have occurred recently.
ft th« Associated Press.
LONDON, May 23.—Prime Minister
Chamberlain told the House of Com
mons today that Czechoslovakia’s
premier and the leader of her Nazified
Germanic minority would meet tonight
or tomorrow in an effort to settle the
dispute which has brought Europe
dangerously near the brink of war.
'“The prime minister spoke before it
was reported from Praha that Konrad
Henlein and Premier Hodza had al
ready begun talking about a settlement
of Czechoslovakia's internal difficulties.
Smiling and afTable, the prime min
ister acknowledged cheers which
greeted his announcement that a con
ference had been arranged between
Premier Milan Hodza and Konrad
Henlein. leader of the Sudeten Ger
mans over whom Germany’s Adolf
Hitler has declared himself protector.
Mr. Chamberlain, markedly recov
ered from his recent gout attack, gave
• he House a brief but carefully worded
resume of the situation.
He said Britain. France, Germany
end Czechoslovakia, as well as Herr
Henlein. all had agreed to expedite
peaceful negotiations calculated to end
dangerous friction between the Praha
government and Nazis on both sides
cf the German-Czech border.
Halifax in House of Lords.
Viscount Halifax, foreign secretary, j
repeated Chamberlain's statement in
an attentive House of Lords. When
he finished there was no comment or
questioning from either government
or opposition benches.
"At the moment the situation seems
to have eased somewhat," Mr. Cham
berlain asserted.
Although he did not say so, it was
presumed the British government had ‘
been instrumental in bringing the1
antagonists together after the Sudeten i
German party had refused to enter i
into negotiations offered by the'
Czechoslovak government.
Mr. Chamberlain merely said on
this point that “the principal concern
of his majesty's government has been
to use all their influence" to bring
about "peaceful negotiations." He
continued:
"The government have represented
fb the Czechoslovakian government
the need for taking every precaution
for the avoidance of incidents and of
making every possible effort to reach
a comprehensive and lasting settle
ment with representatives of the
Sudeten party.
"In this his majesty's government j
enjoyed the full co-operation of the !
French government.
"The Czechoslovakian government 1
responded to this representation with I
the assurance that they appreciated ;
the interest which his majesty’s gov- i
ettiment manifested in this question
and are resolved to seek an early |
complete solution.”
Co-operation Asked.
Mr. Chamberlain went on:
"The British government represent
ed to the German government the i
urgent importance of reaching a set
tlement if European peace is to be pre
served and have expressed their
earnest desire that the German gov
wrnment should co-operate with them
in facilitating an agreement.
"His majesty's government at the
same time informed the German gov- !
ernment of the advice tendered in
Praha and of the assurances received
from the Czechoslovakian government.
"The German minister of foreign ,
affairs said he welcomed the efforts
'being made by his majesty's govern- I
ment. and that the German govern
ment fully shared their desire to see
the negotiations succeed.”
Element R. Attlee, leader of the
Labor opposition, who had conferred
with Mr. Chamberlain earlier in the
day. said he would not press the prime
minister for a further statement “in
view of the tension in the world to
day."
Jan Masaryk. Czechoslovak Minister
to Britain, followed the prime min
ister's speech from a choice position
in the diplomats' gallery along with
Charles Corbin, French Ambassador.
Dr. Herbert von Dircksen, German
Ambassador, was not there.
Mr. Chamberlain and Viscount Hali
fax, foreign secretary, went over the
whole critical European situation at
No. 10 Downing street with Mr.
Attlee and Sir Archibald Sinclair,
respectively, Labor and Liberal leaders
in the House of Commons, and Lord
Snell and the Marquess of Crewe,
holding similar positions in the House
of Lords.
Such a step usually is taken only
when some vital decision or policy re
quiring counsel from all parliamentary
elements is under consideration.
New Step Indicated.
There were indications Britain
might be considering some new step
which would go beyond the present
vigorous diplomatic approaches to both
1 Berlin and Praha. One suggestion
was that an international commis
sion fix responsibility for Oerman
Czech border incidents.
The British government held an al
most unprecedented full Sunday cabi
net session. Premier Chamberlain
broke his week-end holiday and saw
Che German Ambassador Jn an ap
parently thus far successful gesture
of flashing stop signs in Hitler's face.
Czechs Apologise to Reich.
BERLIN. May 33 C/P).—The official
Czechoslovak Press Bureau reported
today that Germany had received a
prompt apology for an attempt by
Czechoslovak soldiers to blow up a
wooden bridge linking the two coun
tries across the River Thaya at Ber
hartstahl.
Foreign Minister Kamil Krofta de
livered the opology yesterday in Praha
to German Minister Ernst Eisenlohr,
even before the latter was aware of
the incident, the press bureau said.
The Czechoslovak military command
condemned the attempt as "unau
thorized.” The official German news
agency reported yesterday that Ger
man gendarmes found fused explosives
attached to various sections of the
bridge.
Czechoslovak soldiers were said to
have fled back across the border when
two German frontier officials ap
proached.
D. N. B.. official German news
agency, reported another border inci
dent in which a Czechoslovak military
plane with two occupants and armed
with a machine gun flew over Ger
man territory near Baerenstein in
Saxony.
The agency said that after flying
low over Baerenstein the plane re
crossed the frontier, but crashed
shortly afterward and burst into
flames. The report did not mention
whether the plane was fired on while
flying over German territory.
However, diplomats believed today
that the general conflict which threat
ened to develop from the Czechoslo
vak-German crisis had been averted,
at least temporarily. But there was
no telling how long the situation
would remain calm. Nobody was
willing to venture a guess.
Political observers close to the
Wilhelmstrasse offered the opinion,
however, that the "future of Europe
lies in the hands of the Praha gov
ernment."
They pointed out that Reichsfuehrer
Adolf Hitler has repeatedly voiced
strong determination to protect mem
bers of his own race and prevent the
spilling of German blood.
"Praha should be guided by common
sense and not take too lightly the
words of Der Fuehrer,” informed ob- i
servers asserted.
Hitler's mouthpiece, the newspaper
Voelkischer Beobachter, reviewing
events of the past few days, said:
"Shots fired at Eger should not be
ignored. The situation is too grave
and the question of guilt unequivocal.
Injustice cannot be eliminated by
creating new injustice.'-’
Indignation Blows Over.
It appeared, however, that the
storm of indignation caused by the
shooting of two Germans at Eger had
practically blown over for the time
being.
A survey of military airports around
Berlin this morning revealed no ex
traordinary activity. The same quiet
prevailed at military barracks, where
soldiers were engaged in routine drill.
Nevertheless, the general situation
remained tense.
WORLD AGRICULTURAL
* SURVEY URGED BY U. S.
By the AMtciated Press.
ROME, May 23.—A world survey of
agricultural resources was proposed
today to the opening session of the
16th Assembly of the International
Institute of Agriculture by J. Clyde
Marquis, United States delegate.
“Inquiry among the leaders of
many organisations and institutions
has disclosed universal agreement
that a broad international study of
the agricultural resources of the world
should be begun at an early date,”
Mr. Marquis told the delegates of
more than 50 nations present.
Mr. Marquis opened discussion on
the subject on behalf of the institute’s
Permanent Committee. Previously he
had Indicated that his proposal had
the approval of Secretary of Agricul
ture Henry A. Wallace.
NEW HONORARY DEGREE
IS AWARDED HOOVER
F. B. I. Head Hade Doctor of
Laws by Oklahoma Baptist
University Today.
J. Edgar Hoover, director of the
Federal Bureau of Investigation, was
in Shawnee, Oltla., today to receive his
sixth honorary degree.
He was to be awarded the honorary
degree of doctor of laws from Okla
homa Baptist University at ceremonies
at the university in Shawnee. He
will make an address at the exercises.
This will be the fifth LL.D. Mr.
Hoover has received in recognition of
his law-enforcement achievements.
The other degree is doctor of science
in public administration, conferred by
Kalamazoo College.
The law doctorates were awarded by
Mr. Hoover’s alma mater, Oeorge
Washington University; New York
University, Pennsylvania State Mil
itary College and Westminster College.
The Australian government expects
a surplus of $10,000,000 this year.
SWAT THE FLY
Take advantage of an
early start by an aggres
sive war on the fly at the
beginning of the season.
The Star has for free
distribution wire • handle
fly swatters.
Ask for one at the
main office of—
Sty* fctar
11th and Pa. Ave. N.W.
So Refreshing
JL \» with good things
jK.fi tO 6flt
Ice-cold Coca-Cola from your own refrigerator is a
natural partner of good things to eat. Try it with
buttered and salted popcorn. It's easy to get a few
bottles or a case (24 bottles) from your dealer.
WASHINGTON
COCA - COLA
Bottling Works
INC.
J. GOODE, MGR.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
"I KNOW TOBACCO.../£$^777'
Mr. lames Graves sells the pick of his crop to Camel
HOW DO I KNOW MY CIGARETTE CONTAINS THE
FINEST TOBACCO ? BECAUSE I SMOKE CAMELS.
CAMEL BOUGHT THE PICK OF My LAST CROP AND PAI
, A SIGHT MORE THAN FOR ORDINARy GRADES. MOST
GROWERS ‘ROUND HERE SOLD THEIR BEST LOTS TO
. CAMELS TOO. NO WONDER CAMEL IS THE MOST '
7 POPULAR CIGARETTE IN THESE PARTS/
MEN who grow fine tobaccos — who sell them — who get the
checks — they know the quality of tobacco that goes into vari
ous cigarettes. And they say, "Camels buy our finest grades.” So, if you
want to enjoy a cigarette made from finer, MORE EXPENSIVE TOBAC
COS—Turkish and Domestic — it’s just plain logic to choose Camels.
TOBACCO
PLANTERS SAY
THE PLAYER WITH THE “BIG SOCK”
Isn’t Always the Fellow With the Big Feet
' J
BRINGS RESULTS
vl
WUffijEi
QJWJTY
SAVE ON
PICNIC NEEDS
CLICQUOT CLUB
Ginger Ale or Soda*
Full Quart
Bottle
Contents
(32 ounces)
At this price CLICQUOT is
the lowest cost per ounce gin
ger ale in our stores. Better
lay in a case or two this week.
CASE of 12.$1.10
pc Soda not carried in all of our stores
Make Sanitary your headquarters for picnic
needs and summer foods. SAVE TIME with
our convenient locations. SAVE MONEY with
our consistently low prices.
N. B. C. DE LUXE ASSORTMENT
A popular “get-acquainted" package,
made up of National Biscuit Company's
large family of biscuit celebrities.
Choice assortment of sweet biscuit.
RED CROSS TOffiLS—2 -u-15“
Take a roll along on your picnic. Keep a roll
hanging in your kitchen—youll find hundreds
of uses for them and save laundry in the bargain.
l^k
ready ready to
W 12 OUNCE CAN...
Cut-Rite Wax Paper 2 V111*
Sanico Paper Napkins uSS, pkI0ot 5*
Rath’s Spiced Ham Re^'° -- 29®
Underwood Deviled Ham - - - 2*r 13®
Potatostix —10®
N. B. C. Ritz Crackers KJ:uEm 23®
Lindsay c*"r' Olives ..«- 23®
Sanico Peanut Butter Complete _ »15®
Without It
Salad Dressing -.& 25®
Sanico Mayonnaise
Smooth ” * 23®
Hellmann’s Mayonnaise.*• 32®
Kraft Miracle Whip..p*- 27*
Heinz Cucumber Pickles-'°;r 21®
Fannings Butter Pickles. 15®
Assort As You Wish
Coca-Cola
Dr. Pepper
Seven Up
Hires Root Beer
Assorted Sodas
Mix 'em up any way you like—
SOe a dozen! Keep an assortment
in tkf ice box for hot weather.
A Platinum Banded
Libbey Safedge
Glass Tumbler
with the purchase of each
half pound of
Brewer-Snyder
POTATO CHIPS
Vi pound pkg. OQ0
and tumbler_aaV
SANICO
FLOUR
| Perfect results
guaranteed.
i 12 lb. sack_
Your ravortte Cereal Priced at Rock Bot
tom—Lay in a Large Assortment This Week
WHEATIES - 2 > * 19°
PUFFED WHEAT . 2 15c
Shredded Ralston. 2pk” 21e
Shredded Wheat.. 2pkg> 23*
Country Cousin 2 *r11*
Heinz Rice Flakes 2pk“- 23°
Cream of Wheat—X 14c
Quaker Oats 8C p8 r 19c
A Package of POST HUSKIES
for 2c with the purchase of two packages of
At our regular
low price of
2 pkgs- I Ic
All Three for
2 POST TOASTIES ond
1 POST HUSKIES
Kellogg’s Corn Flakes 2 *£, 15c
Kellogg’s Rice Krispies - X 12®
Grape-Nuts Flakes-X 9*
OUR FAMOUS
GREEN BAG COFFEE
Now at the Lowest
Price in History
. . . the same tine coffee
as always.
Large Size
FLORIDA
ORANGES
23® "25® ”29® D”“n
All Three Sizes Not in All Stores
The Florida orange season will soon be over.
Enjoy this juicy, healthful fruit while you can.
Corn on the Cob “J ««• 5e
Ripe Tomatoes - 3 25c
Crisp Radishes _ 2 bunches 5® •
Red Beets- _bunch
Let’s Have
LAMB
> Forequarter Cuts Priced
Low—the same fine quaU
ity you always get in our.
markets.
Shoulder Lamb Roast wh.u »>• 17«
Breast of Lamb -.lb-10®
Shoulder Lamb Chops —Ib 25°
Rib Lamb Chops -.,b 31*
SWIFT’S
SMOKED
SHOULDERS
6 to 8 pound 4 *1*
Hock less, ' I I"
per pound ... B H
Making a Hit!
Ground Boot
In visking casing
Ground from choice cuts
and nocked in, special
casine to keep it sweet
and moist.
SU -19*
For the Picnic
SANITARY’S
FRANKS
The hifhest quality
C. I. Gart. Grado 1.
IVEAL!
veal Cutlets -Ib- 39°
Rib Veal Chops <•> 31*
Shldr. Veal Roast .lb-19°
Stuffed’-'" Veallb- 23®
Loin Veal Chopslb- 37*
n^KSS^e^eSSSaBSSBSXSSSSSBBBSaHHV
Don’t Bother
Cooking a Ham 1or
Memorial Day . . . buy a
KREY HAM
Ready-to-Serve
Our markets will be supplied by
i 1 o’clock tomorrow.
[ Whole or
Hock End
| Per pound
Prices are for District of Columbia until close of business Wednesday, May 25, 1938,

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