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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 24, 1938, Image 18

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Hollywood’s Busiest Title
Belongs to Jack Benny
Comic Found Thriving on Six Times
The Energy the Average Person
Puts Forth Per Week.
By JAY CARMODY. ,
HOLLYWOOD, May 24.—If the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences ever decides to award an Oscar (a kind of laurel wreath
in bronze I to the busiest actor in Hollywood, Jack Benny ought to
win it. Poor rich Mr. Benny. Keeping two publics, radio and pic
ture, amused consumes a lot of energy.
Out at Paramount, Mr. Benny is playing a Puck-like cowboy band
leader in "Artists and Models.” He is*
playing it on a stage presided #>ver,
from the standpoint of publicity, by
Don King.
"Where's Jack?” we asked, noticing
a complete absence of Benny from the
set.
"Over in some corner working with
his two writers on his next radio pro
gram,” explains Don. “Want to see
him?”
We did, as who wouldn’t? But be
fore saying so, one calculates that
talking to Jack for 10 or 15 minutes
will be a consumption of some $782.34
(or something like that) of his time.
Moreover, there is the possibility that
stealing him away from his next radio
script may affect the spontaneity, the
humor or some other quality of his
next Sunday night program. That
would be annoying to several million
citizens and might have some effect
upon the blood pressure of the spon
sor's stockholders.
Luckily, for column purposes, Jack
Is not the guy to figure it the same
way at all. Moreover, he would be
the last person in the world to want
you to feel that way. Don knows it,
t;o he disappears for a minute and
comes back with what appears to be
Seabiscuit smoking a long, tawny cigar.
It is not Seabiscuit, however. It is
Jack Benny, as you knew it would be
all the time.
It seems funny, but you do not asso
ciate Jack with motion pictures in
spite of the fact that the immediate
environment is filled with Akim Tam
iroffs, Monte Blues and a chorus so
gorgeous you just want to settle down
there and all grow old together. Mitch
ell Leisen, tije director: the camera
crew and scores of major and minor
players and technicians are also pres
ent to give the thing a studio atmos
phere, but you still associate Jack with
radio and Sunday evenings around the
fireplace listening to him.
In spite of all the work he does,
his public do not have to worry
about Jack. His health is fine, and
he is thriving on six times as much
effort as the average person puts
forth.
You hear a lot about Benny being
a kind of scientific humorist on the
air. a fellow who works out inflec
tion. timing and all the other details
of his programs with as much care
as a surgeon. But it really is not as
hard and fast as that in the affairs
of the Benny stock company. .
‘‘We can't overrehearse.” he says.
‘‘We are careful not to do so. The
program has to sound spontaneous,
and to sound that way it must be so.
Consequently we don’t use stop
watches or anything like that. We
run through the script a couple of
times, then forget it so it will sound
natural on the air. As a matter of
fact we do two shows every Sunday,
you know. And the second one some
times is less effective than the first.
That's because we have learned our
lines a bit too well, learned where to
expect laughs from the audience and
have a tendency to change the tim
ing to accommodate them. That’s not
so good.”
Mr. Benny, who undoubtedly has
been over the same ground thou
sands of times before but does not
mind it at all, drops radio for pic
tures at this point. The lights are
set for a scene in which he and his
stranded (in France) troupe of en
tertainers are rehearsing for a num
ber which they hope to make so awful
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that they will be deported. That,
Mr. Benny explains the scene, is the
only way they could get back to the
United States.
He and the pretty chorus then
swing into the scene, a corny dance
number which ought to look awfully
funny in the final picture. The dance
director explains between shots that
it has been a difficult job to get the
chorus to perform as badly as the
Benny dancers are supposed to.
"They are all beautiful dancers,”
he says. "You should see them in a
ballet number. They are so good it
is hard for them to be bad.”
They seemed to be doing a pretty
good job of it, so we decided to leave
them in favor of the sound stage,
where Dorothy Lamour was working,
a couple of corners away.
It was not a very good decision as
things turned out. The scene upon
which Miss Lamour, out of a sarong,
because the picture is "Spawn of the
North,” was working was a death
bed affair with George Raft doing
the dying. He is supposed to die in
Miss Lamour's arms, which probably
is one of the reasons why so many
youngsters get movie struck.
They were all set to go when Miss
Lamour balked. The scene, she de
cided, was too moving to be played
before an audience Audiences, of
course, may come to the same con
clusion when they see Miss Lamour
playing it when the picture is re
leased, but at the time there seemed
to be nothing to do but accept her
version. So the audience obligingly
and not unwillingly walked out on
Miss Lamour.
It had already seen Katharine
Cornell do death scenes, anyway.
* * * *
IV/f UCH more congenial was the
^ sound stage upon which Wild
William Wellman is making "Men
With Wings.” Mr. Wellman, who
looks precisely as you would expect
a World War flyer to look, like an
eagle that is, is one of Hollywood’s
most colorful directors. Always he is
a better actor than any one playing
for him. His constant monologue
sounds as if it might have been writ
ten by Noel Coward in one of Cow
ards merrier moods. It is bright,
sardonic, pointed and yet strangely
good humored.
"You rehearsed that in front of a
mirror,” the visiting critic accuses
Mr. Wellman after one crack at the
way Lynn Overman and Porter Hall
were playing a scene in a newspaper
office.
“Sure,” says Wellman. “How could
I be so good if I didn’t?”
Mr. Wellman knows all the an
swers. And it is more fun watching
him swirl around his set talking to
himself, to every one el6e and to no
body at all than it is almost any
where else in Hollywood.
| State Theater Gets
Two Fight Films.
piLMS of the Jack Dempsey-Gene
Tunney heavyweight boxing con
test held in 1927 and of the Max
Schmelling-Joe Louis encounter of
1936 are being shown at the State
Theater in Bethesda. Md., today, to
morrow and Thursday.
Manager Henry Hiser announces
that this is the first instance in which
a print of the former picture has been
made available to Washington fight
fans and that the Schmelling-Louis
film is being revived because of a wide
interest irt their return bout.
Both pictures are being presented in
addition to the regular feature attrac
tions on these days.
Dance Pupils Offer
New-Type Show.
'J'HE Hoffman School of Dancing
will present a floor show employ
ing the talents of advanced pupils in
the Kennedy-Warren ballroom on
Friday evening. The show is to com
mence at 9 o'clock and be followed
by dancing until midnight. Lillian
and Jack Hoffman, directors of the
school, decided upon the floor show
and dance idea because of the length
of the usual recital.
Younger pupils are to perform in a
dancing diary revue at St. Paul’s
auditorium on June 4 at 8 o'clock.
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Our Hollywood-scanning Mr. Carmody finds Comedian Jack Benny laboring array on the
“Artists and Models” set, devoting his "rest periods” to the business of next Sunday night.
‘Vivacious Lady’ to Open
At Keith’s Tomorrow
New Film Stars Ginger Rogers.
Civic Theater Director
Writes a Letter.
By HARRY MacARTHlIR.
ALL you good people who have been waiting around and putting off the
happy business of seeing Deanna Durbin in "Mad About Music" had
better get down to Keith's. And that means, not tomorrow, but
right now. For though we made a vow only two days ago not to
mention it until it was on the screen, Hardie Meakin has assured us that
“Vivacious Lady" will open tomorrow, come you-know-what or high water.
and that the new issue of "March of
Time” will open along with it.
"Vivacious Lady” is the new Ginger
Rogers picture which finds her in
volved in a comedy romance which
has been highly spoken of in some cir
cles, though not having seen it we
couldn't agree or disagree. Anyhow
Ginger is a night club singer who mar
ries a small town college professor, a
situation not without its possibilities
as almost any one will agree. The
others in the cast are James Stewart,
Jimmy Ellison, Charles Coburn, Beu
lah Bondi and Phyllis Kennedy.
The new “March of Time” has to do
with the manner in which short
change and short-weight artists steal
hundreds of millions of dollars from
housewives; a typical Representative
at work, and England's bankrupt peers.
* -Or * *
T IFE can be no end difficult. Some
one is always taking us to task f<ir
one thing or another. Now it is the
Civic Theater's director, F. Cowles
Strickland, who does not, as we half
way expected, see eye to eye with us
about “. . . one third of a nation
. . Mr. Strickland submits a brief
for the defense, starting out by ad
dressing it “Dear Mr. MacArthur,” a
matter of formality which has us
floored from the outset. Then he
goes on:
“Your riview of “. . . one third of a
nation ..brings up a very interesting
point that Washingtonians will not be
interested in the Civic Theater's pres
ent production because it is about New
York. There is, of course, the horrible
possibility that you may be right.
“It was the opinion of the Board
of Governors of the Civic Theater
that Washington, in spite of the fact
that it is some 200 miles from Broad
way, is not a ‘provincial’ city, that it
is in fact and spirit the Capital of
the Nation and that its citizens are
interested in national problems and
therefore they would be interested in
the New York version of a problem
which you point out is not purely local
but also exists in Philadelphia and St.
Louis and Chicago and Washington
and probably lq Keokuk and Kala
mazoo and Xenia for all you know.
“Lest any one should leave the thea
ter comfortably smug that Washing
tonians need not be worried or con
cerned we went to some pains to in
clude the Washington scene. We
hoped we dramatized the fact that
there are many Washingtonians who
are unconscious of the local problem,
which is in many ways more vicious
than the New York situation, since
bad housing has infected the entire
city and is not localized to a particu
lar area.
(The living newspaper technique
condones the use of only partial
quotes, so it probably will be all right
with Mr. Strickland if we pass over
a couple of paragraphs, because of the
space situation.)
“Of course, as a critic and reporter
you may be right. It may be that
Washington audiences will be smug
and unmoved because the drama on
our stage is set in New York. If you
are, it will be too bad for *. . . one
third of a nation . . and too bad
for Washington.
* * * *
TpHE deleted paragraphs have to do
with th? belief by the Civic Thea
ter that . . one third of a na
tion . . is a good play and point
out that one does not dismiss the
Abbey Players because their plays deal
with Ireland, so that we shall take
up first. . . one third of a na
tion ...” to our way of thinking is
not a good play. It may be the most
vivid and exciting thing the Civic
Theater has done this season, but it
is no more a good play than is a stir
ring film like ‘‘The River,” one of
the best things the cinema hgs done, a
good photoplay. There’s a difference.
And, Mr. Strickland, if you thought
it was a good play, would you have
tampered with it to add that Wash
ington scene? If you were doing,
say, “The Plough and the Stars”
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:
! would you include a scene bringing
the Irish revolution home to Wash
ington "lest any one should leave
the theater comfortably smug that
Washingtonians need not be worried
or concerned"? You would not, for
"The Plough and the Stars” tells a
living, vital story of its times because
it translates the story of those times
in terms of a group of people you come
to know rather well through the four
acts of the play. On the other hand
"... one third of a nation ...”
tells what we have no doubt is a
dramatic story in terms of old law
tenements and people in the mass,
and try as you will you cannot become
intimate with an old law tenement or
people in the mass.
After reading the review again (a
painful process, too) we still cannot
find any place where we said Wash
ington audiences were smug and un
moved by it all. What w'e tried to
say, and if we failed it w-as not our
judgment of the show at fault but
our ineptitude at saying what we
meant, was that ”... one third of
a nation ...” seems definitely in
tended to drive the story of the
housing problem home to New York.
A good play is a good play in
Swedish or Russian or French, so
long as it speaks a universal language.
In one of the paragraphs of Mr.
Strickland's letter he points out that
”... one third of a nation ...”
has a universal theme, which, to be
sure, is true, but it treats of its uni
versal theme in the language of New
York. It is not the story of upwards
of 4.000,000 unfortunates who are ill
housed, ill clad and ill nourished; it
is the story of this one-third of a
nation translated for New York
consumption and not distilled for
universal consumption. The vastly
greater amount of applause on open
ing night for the one Washington
scene than for any other scene seems
to us to bear out our contention. It
also seems to indicate that it still
will not be too bad for Washington
if Washington audiences can't get
too worked up about the why and the
wherefore and the evils of New York’s
particular part of the housing prob
lem.
AMUSEMENTS.
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
Civic Theater—. . one third of a
nation . .the living newspaper looks
at the housing problem: 8:30 p.m., at
the Wardman Park Theater.
Earle—“The Adventures of Robin
Hood,” Errol Flynn is the Sherwood
Forest boss man: 10 a m.. 12:20, 2:40,
5:05, 7:25 and 9:50 p.m. Stage shows:
11:45 am., 2:10, 4:30, 6:55 and 9:15
p.m.
Capitol—“Hold That Kiss,” Kid
Brother Mickey Rooney aids Maureen
O'Sullivan's romance: 11 am., 1:30,
4:20, 7:10 and 10 p.m. Stage shows:
12:40, 3:30, 6:20 and 9:10 pm.
Metropolitan—“Dangerous to Know,”
Akim Tamiroff is the racket man:
11:20 am., 1:20, 3:30, 5:35, 7:40 and
9:45 p.m.
Palace—“The Adventures of Marco
Polo," Explorer Gary Cooper meets
Princess Sigrid Gurie: 12 noon, 2:25,
4:50, 7:10 and 9:35 p.m.
Columbia—“Her Jungle Love,” Dor
othy Lamour in a sarong again: 11
a.m„ 1:10, 3:20, 5:25, 7:35 and 9:50
p.m.
Keith’s — “Mad About Music.”
Deanna Durbin sings: 11:15 a.m., 1:20,
3:25, 5:30, 7:35 and 9:40 p.m.
Belasco—"Look Out for Love," an
Anna Neagle-Tullio Carminati musi
cal: 2:51, 4:39, 6:27, 8 15 and 10:03
p.m.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts. Con
tinuous from 10 a m. to midnight. '
Little—"The Wave.” splendid pho
tography and powerful story of a fight
for existence: 12:27. 2:52, 5:17, 7:42
and 10:07 p.m. “Elephant Boy,” Kip
ling's "Toomai of the Elephants”:
11:08 am., 1:03, 3:58, 6:23 and 8:48
p.m.
Halstead at Park.
J-IENRY HALSTEAD and his popu
lar dance band from the West
Coast began an engagement at Glen
Echo's Spanish ballroom last night.
The leader, billed as "The Aristocrat
of the Supper Club,1’ specializes in
suave rhythm.
-■ ■ ■ •
Before dental science had reached
its present stage, history was sprinkled
with serious illnesses and even death
of world-famous people, as a result
of infected teeth.
_AMUSEMENTS.
NOW SHOWING
_
Mrs. Temple Tries Coy
Publicity-Escape Trip
Decides to Take Press Agent
And Tell Destination Despite
Ban During Vacation.
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD, May 24 (N.A.N.A.).—Ronald Colman is trying to get a
job for Benita Hume in his current film. So it would seem that their
romance is still on, although the marriage is still a ceremony of the
future—if at all—unless Ronnie can be convinced that wedded bliss
is just that.. . Shirley Temple’s mother assures this reporter that, unless the
great public leaves them alone on their Imminent vacation tour, they will
come right back to Hollywood. (But*
why do you tell every one where you
are going. Mrs. Temple, and why are
you taking a
press agent along
unless you like
and want public
ity?) . . . Which
reminds me that
Olivia De Havil
land is now pay
ing for her incog
nito trip abroad
with a series of
personal appear
ances on her way
back.
* * * *
Ginger Rogers
and Fred Astaire
are making their
Shtilah Graham.
last singing and dancing picture
together—“Carefree"—which is bad
news for their joint fans. “I feel the
public has had enough of us,” says
Ginger. I wonder . . . Freddie Bar
tholomew, it is rumored, will receive
a long vacation after his current film,
“Lord Jeff," is completed. The idea
is to get him over the awkward stage.
He will not, of course, be paid during
this period. This columnist's blood
reaches fever heat when considering
the cases of Freddie and Jackie Coogan
who both have worked very hard
without receiving a cent of the fortune
they earned.
* * * *
Douglas Fairbanks, jr„ spent the
entire day sleeping in a bed for a
scene in “The Young in Heart," and
then said, “I think I’ll go home and
have insomnia now." , . . Nowadays,
producers travel with as much pomp
and ceremony as the kings of old.
Darryl Zanuck's entourage to Europe
numbers 29 strong. His polo ponies
have already been shipped. Also
Harry Brand, publicity boss*of Twen
tieth Century-Fox, who will prepare
the way for his master. Zanuck has
expressed a desire to meet King
George of England . . . Wayne Morris,
when questioned about his friendship
with Priscilla Lane, replied, “I’m sick
of all that mush," which may mean
anything . . . Irvin Cobb asked Nun
naily Johnson whether he could name
25 plays of Shakespeare-. “I couldn't
even name 25 plays of George Kauf
man,” replied Johnson.
* * * *
The movie and literary folk
picketing on behalf of local striking
Newspaper Guild members are being
pestered by autograph collectors.
Among the bothered ones—Gale Son
dergaard, Marie Wilson, Lionel Stan
der, Dorothy Parker and Ring Lardner,
jr. The sympathizing Screen Actors’
Guild, incidentally, has unofficially
threatened the offending newspaper
with the cancellation of 2,000 sub
scriptions.
Knitting notes . . . Carole Lombard
is knitting a scarf for Clark Gable
. . . Bette Davis is busy with some
hooked rugs . . . Gail Patrick is
AMUSEMENTS.
1 ABOARD THE STEAMER*
FREE DANCING TO |
Bernie Jarbo’s Night Hawks I
On the largest dance floor aboard ■
any Atlantic Seaboard veaael. Mod- ■
ern. glass-enclosed boat. Refresh- ■
ment bar. LEAVES 8:15 P. M. ■
NA. 7722 ADULTS 1
Tomonow
“° KEITH'S
A WASHINGTON INSTITUTION
ALL of. HER brilliant ^
talents combined .... *■
in one sensational
picture .. 1
Ginger goes to col*
lege . . . but not the i
way you think . . !
GINGER
RO«ER$
JAMES
STEWART
'W
FAMES ELLISON • BEULAH BONDI *7G
CHARLES COBURN **»d h- *"• /
The story of a night club ■fc/iie
tempest who married a ^Ue^*^®*
professor and settled down * £;a .°°tf afl<j
with a terrific jolt that
shook a college town ..!
crfrLtbtuJ... • new issue of "The MARCH of TIME"
Racketeers and Housewives • Friend of the People • England’s Bankrupt Peers
LAST DAY e DEANNA DURBIN • HERBERT MARSHALL in "MAD ABOUT MUSIC”
working on some dinner mats . . .
And John Barrymore is whiling away
between-take waits with a cute two
purl, two-plain number. (John is not
the only masculine knitter. The Duke
of Windsor is quite good, they tell me.)
* * * *
Jeanette MacDonald and her Gene
(Raymond) are back in town, and the
rustic life of Hollywood, more or less,
is back to normal. On the MacDon
ald-Raymond estate is a private tea
house to which they retire when
unwelcome visitors arrive. Jeanette
and Gene also have a separate music
room apiece. But their voices get
together occasionally for private pho
nograph recordings. Miss MacDon
ald’s newest picture with Nelson
Eddy — “Sweethearts” — probably will
be in technicolor , . . The happiest
person at that recent fistic exhibition
of Errol Flynn’s in Havana was Wife
Lili Damita, who likes nothing better
than a good fight.
(Copyright. 1938. by the North American
Newspaper Alliance, Inc.)
_AMUSEMENTS._
d “HOlT tnha I
I Mtr(lrit SULLIVAN Miek.y R00NET I
■ Dolls O'KEEFE t
I STACE iHffCUdt _I
1 Simmy KAYE^V
1 ol kn ORCHESTRA# li I F. M.^L
■ ABE LYMAN \£&l
■ in hi, lamed ORCHESTRA ■
1 pttfCHgad hi, CAUF0HHI* REVUE M
mT CPtud.. ON THE SCREEN M
%Tho RITZ BROTHERS t» hm-buiyM
\jfENTUCKY MOONSHINE” f
TORT MARTIN
MARJORIE KEIIEA^^
■ J Lilly mini 0 »ill ilvuliri! k
I GARY COOPER. I
IU^IL^marco polo I
SibiiI 6oM»yn’i soas«ti«Ml triiH^k
now
let JUNGLE LQVE^&ovfeir
DOiOTHY LAMOC1 • RAY BGLLAJID „
Mw i. Ith IfM* *TI» Lift ■AMPT _
' 1^°°9fm ***•**; f ' *
_AMUSEMENTS._
Door* Open ot 9:45 o.m. Feature Pre
sented ot 10:00 o.m., 12:20, 2:40, 5:05,
7:25, 9:50 p.m.
fV
• J” Last 3 Days I j
"TO ADVENTURES Of l ]
I 'Robin Hood' I
A Warner Bros Matt*rtnect K
■ M TECHNICOLOR ■
V unth ■
§ Errol Flynn *
I Olivia DeHaviUand j
On
i ALBERTINA RASCH BALLET
■Hitter acts
Katherine Cay
HEPBURN * GRANT
In Columbia'! Hit
"HOLIDAY"
—On Staff—
3 STOOGES-HAPPY FELTON'S OKH
Last 3 Days
DANGEROUS TO KNOW
A Paramount Picture unth
AKIM TAMIROfF • RAIL PATRICK
ANNA MAT KMC
“TORCH! DUNE IN
PANAMA”
A Warner Bros. Picture unth
LOU LANE & PAUL KELLY
TRANS-LUX
NEWS IN FILMS |
THRILLS — IMPRESSIVE - ■
^ OLE GANG.” DON. DICK larf-i.l
^S^SHORUUBJECTSjMI
SWIM OPENS NEXT
POOL SATURDAY
ALL OTHER SO FEATURES
DAILY NOON ’TIL M1DNITE
DANCE TO THE NEW
HIT BAND OF
IlEJMtY HALSTEAD
(IT’S REALLY FINE)
AND YOU’LL LIKE
MARGARET REED
HIS SPLENDID VOCALIST
SWIMMING POOL
OPENS ON SAT.
ACADEMY or p,r,'f1t s{,n{,.<1 p®.010®1**
£. Lawrence Phillip?' Theatre Beautiful
Coutinunu? From 4:70 P.M.
WILLIAM POWELL and MYRNA LOY la
“DOUBLE WEDDING.”
“All-American Sweetheart.”
With PATRICIA FARR. SCOTT COLTON.
CAROLINA Air-Conditioned
ROBERT TAYLOR in “A YANK AT OX
FORD.” Also Laurel and Hardy in Tne
County Hospital.”__
riDri IT Penna. Ave. at 21st St.
L1XVLLL Home of Mirronhonir Sound
Matinees. Tues.. Thurs., Sat.. Sun.
LEWIS STONE. MICKEY ROONEY end
CECILIA PARKER in ‘ JUDGE HARDY S
_CHILDREN.” _ Shorts._
DUMBARTON 13 AlrS'onditioned
JOHN BARRYMORE and LOUISE CAMP
BELL in BULLDOG DRUMMOND 3 RE
VENGE ” Also News and Comedy._
FAIRLAWN Air-Conditioned
FRANCHOT TONE in "LOVE IS A HEAD
_ACHE."__
rniirDCCC Niehols Ave. &
LUHuntSS Portland St. S.R
JOHN BARRYMORE in “BULLDOG
_DRUMMOND'S PERIL."_
LIDO 3227 M 8‘ N W
SHIRLEY TEMPLE. RANDOLPH SCOTT
in "REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK
FARM."_Also Walt Disney^s Review._
I 1TTI C BOS 9th St. N.W.
LI 1 1 LL Air-Conditioned
“THE WAVE.”
“ELEPHANT BOY.”
DDINPECC in® H st. N.E.
1 IxImLEiijO Double Feature
GARY COOPFR p.nd JEAN ARTHUR In
"MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN."
CEDRIC HARDWICKE i.n "KING SOLO
_ MON'S MINES."___
CCm 8714 Georcla A*e.
jlLU Silver Sprint. Md
IRENF DUNNE and CARY GRANT In
"THE AWFUL TRUTH.” Cont. from 6
_P.M.____
(TAMTAM Bth and C Sts. N.E.
Of All inn Finrst Sound Enuipment
Continuous From S:7<J P.M.
“THE ROAD BACK ”
By ERICK MARIE REMARQUE.
(The Seoue] to "All Quiet on the
Western Front.")
“Daughter of Shanghai,”
With ANNA MAY WONG._
T A If AM A 4th and Butternut Sts.
lAlVUlTIA No Parkin? Troubles
GEORGE BRENT in
“Gold Is Where You Find It.”
RICARDO CORTEZ In
__“CITY GIRL.”_
DADO 7101 Wisconsin Ave.,
BUI\U Bethesda. Md. Wi. 5858.
Continuous <>-11 P.M
JOEL McCREA and FRANCIS DEA
in “WELLS FARGO.”
Ample Free Parkins Space.
Completely Air-Conditioned._
^ HIPPODROME Doub e Feature
JT MARTHA RAYE. "BIG BROADCAST
C/3 OF 1978." FRANK MORGAN. "BEG,
BORROW OR STEAL."
riMCn MT RAINIER. MD.
LA1ULU com. b-ii p.m.
BETTE DAVIS In "JEZEBEL." At
6:45, 9:15._
2 A Dr A nr HY ATT S VILLE. md.
iZ AKLAUfc Double Feature
GLADYS 8WARTHOUT. "ROMANCE
S IN THE DARK.” JOHN BARRY
35 MORE in "BULLDOG DRUMMOND S
w REVENGE.”_
*o RICHMOND * ay^T?mor.
DOROTHY LAMOUR "HER JUNGLE
fl LOVE.”_
• S DCCn ALEXANDRIA- VA.
lVLCiU Today-Tomor.-Thurs.
U CLARK GABLE. MYRNA LOY "TEST
43 PILOT.”
bFree Parkin* Space—snn Cars.
Completely Air-Conditioned.__
" Mil A ROCKVILLE. MD.
IV11LU Cont. 7-11 P.M.
ROBT. MONTGOMERY. "FIRST 100
YEARS." At 7:40. »:40.
Completely Alr-Condttioned.
■I ADI DAD A Upper Marlboro. Md.
RIAKLDUKU Cont. 7-11 P.M.
TYRONE POWER. ALICE FAYE. "IN
OLD CHICAGO." At 7. !): 15,_
ARLINGTON, VA.
mil CAM 1770 Wilson Blvri.
WILoUn Opp. Colonial Viliam
IRENE DUNNE and DOUG FAIRBANKS.
Jr., in "JOY OF LIVING."
ASHTON Clarendon. Vo
DICK FORAN and JUNE TRAVIS In "OVER
THE WALL.”
A
_ .Theaters Ha vine Matlneea
O A| VPPT -321 Wisconsin Ave.
\.rtlaVILIVI Cl, 2315. Mat. 2 P.M.
ALICE FAYE. TYRONE POWER in
IN OLD CHICAGO. " At 2:.'to 4.5(1.
~ . l.i. Cartoon. Newsreel.
So fFNTRAI...4Mnth s»- n.w.
~ s VjQn 1 ArtL Met *811 Opens Ham
"J ?FVtE„DAVIS in "JEZEBEL.” At
a® 11:40, 2:10._4:35. 7:05. 9:30.
= 2 PFNN . fi’’° Pa- Avenue S.E!
TYRONE roWER^ttlcfFAYK^n
0 - “IN OLD CHICAGO.”At 2:23 .Y4:4o,
■^05 « •'»•>. P:.J0._Short Subject.
SHERIDAN &•■«»*‘jgpiS'U
° EDDYETTE”l~‘)iaTCD0^"AL°-* KELSON
* WE?T.“m A?^°* JR
_Also Short Subject. ' **
C/3 TlVOf I ,Jt.h st * FarkBd7vw7
06 4ffiIPo^RITLicl,^?^d
W C?So.^EA^2.i%V4N PED VHnil
< UPTOWN ne°v. 5.1£- fey*
U EDinM rE< ,r^DacDON ALD* nelson
S EDI1Y ,n -'GIRL OF THF GOLDEN
*U .wthr_At_2:2_0. 4:45. 7:05. p.30
H T.hii',r,r.s r”a.v,»*L Eve. Performances
. AMBASSADOR J^h cdi. £,£?'•
t/3 hotmi ,.advfn ruHES of robin
OHOOD with ERROL FLYNN cnrf
OLIVIA DE HA'. INLAND. At b? 7*4^
gg 0.4.». Also Newsrecl.
CO APOLLO 6'yf^sNt:~
_ a SHIRLEY TEMPLE "RFRPpca
06 OF sunnybrooi: FARM."R|?E6EfrA
[jJ 5. 0.4.1._Comedy. Newsreel.
5 AVALON '
i* BRUCF P ^0:-TR,Tr,ERY' V&OINIA
< «f^srMr„ re;:
^ AVE. GRAND ,,s,5SA,Si8 Ef
CHARLIE MCCARTHY. ’ EDGAR
„ ?FR-G.?i? ln.«AG2LDWYN FOLLIES.”
3* COLONY JTe«r;?iaA^wT_
jf £ BE_iTF DAVIS in "JEZEBEL.” At
CQ ‘ l»:45u Short Subject.
5 s HOME 1”'?t8S,88N E: *
•50 BET IE DAVIS in “JEZEBEL.** At
tz / 0 t4o.__ Also Cartoon.
it savoy 3o:irin^w~
ii sssss
AT FORTYAt fi:15 8. 9:5(1.
£ YORK *’*■ Avf- and Quebec Place;
*• IUAIV Ra. noo.
"Charlie McCarthy.” edoar
Bergen m -goldwyn follies.”
_ At 5:15. 7:20. 9:25._Newsreel.
NEWTON ",s%fi?VSr=~
“THE FIRST HUNDRED
YEARS.”
ROBERT MONTGOMERY and
rJ-\ VIRGINIA BRUCE.
z* Matinee. 2:00 P.M._
£3 JESSE THEATER ,8tsh„VrETin*
Double Feature.
35 “Law of the Underworld."
*“5 CHESTER MORRIS. ANNE SHIRLEY.
£3 “Flight Into Nowhere,”
EJ JACK HOLT. JACQUELINE WELL8
S SYLVAN
u3 “Thrill of a, Lifetime,"
“ _ ^ohnWSI *nd
PALM THEATER DErVARAYr
‘Girl of the Golden West,’
JEANETTE MacDONALD, NELSON
_ EDDY.
STATE-BETHESDA 'ffiSJK-til
SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTIONS.
AN II-YEAR-OLD FIGHT FILM.
FIRST TIME SHOWN LOCALLY.
JACK DEMPSEY VS.
GENE TUNNEY.
THE FAMOUS “LONG-COUNT" BOUT.
ALSO BY SPECIAL REQUEST—
JOE LOUIS VS.
MAX SCHMELING.
••KNOCK-OUT” FIGHT OF 1938.
GEORGE BRENT in
“Gold Is Where You Find It."
Feature at « S5 and !>:37 F.M.
_Flints at_6:nn and 8:42 P.M._
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
CTiTt NO PARKING I P1J
MAIL WORRIES LXE.
TYRONE POWER I DOROTHY
and ALICE FAYE I LAMOURJB .
chicaqo:° I ”*1nnnhnL"
r

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