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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 21, 1938, Image 36

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SUBURBAN HEIGHTS
—By Gluyas Williams
FRED PERLEV MISSED A GOLF MATCH THE OTHER
MORNING BECAUSE HEARING RAIN FALLING WHEN HE
WORE HE SHUT OFF HIS ALARM AND WENT BACK TO'SLEEP,
DISCOVERING THREE HOURS LATER THAT THE SUN WAS SHINING
AND HIS SPRINKLER STILL GOING FROM THE EVENING BEFORE
b-ll (dopyritK MM. W tw >* |» )
GROWING PAINS
i—. —
—By Phillips
~i— 11
e«onnM, im r,,^ t.'
DO YOU HAVE TO SHOOT THE SUN EVERY FIVE MINUTES TO
CONVINCE YOURSELF THAT YOU'RE IN THE MIDDLE OF CENTRAL
PARK?"
CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
l 2 3™“ r~ 5“ 6™ 7 p j9"Hio 111™
12 n n-—
is i6 i7-rr“-—
19
nns W23-J mb-2r \u
„-<p-p
30 mmM * Wm ~l~""" WM* “
34 35 IWffl&b Lm^81 ““
—WmL^.1
49 50 51 5T”
53 54 55
HORIZONTAL.
, 1. Crush. 20. Waited. 32. Wire 43. T. feel pain.
*• ”• P,«: •* 44. Blood fluid.
.. ocean 23. Neck" piece, M«U"
13. Time. 84. Ensuing. 34' Pter“■•
13. Fabric. 27. Pronoun. 36. Ugly woman. 49. Grain.
14. Swiss canton. 28. Careless. 37. Biver. 50 Ta aBpeas4i
15. Legally 29. Lower. 38. Cosy. ^2. Weight
pledged. 30. Chaldean 39. Poker pool. ft3‘ T# e#|ar
IT. Sundry. city. *0. To Jump. S4‘ companions.
19. To unite. 31. Biblical land. 41. Deceit. 55. Veteh.
VERTICAL.
1. Poke. 11. Sloths. 29. Large. 43. Malt
3. In the past. 16. To plunge. 31. Ethiopian beverages.
3. Instructor. 18. Mercenary. title. 44. Seed
4. To run away. 20. To spar. 32. R„g. container.
5. Cover. 21. Explosive 35. Wrinkled. 45. Song.
6. French sounds. 36. Garden tool. 46. Number.
,rllcle' II. Wading bird. 37. To tell. 47. Jutting rock.
T. Environments. 23. Wicked. 39. S. American 48. Abstract
8. Wife of 25. Ohio city. river. being.
- G«™inl. 26. Cavalry unit. 40. Falsehood. 51. Old
9. Aid skins. 28. Spanish plural 42. Moslem testament
10. To mistake. article. elerie. (abbr.).
(Copyright, 1938.) ,
LETTER-OUT_
J PONTIAC L*tter-Out and Americans erava
2_ . , , _ . . Letter-Out and a sailer spins It.
RAYON 2
2 RELAPSE Letter-Out to have a preference. ^
TABBIED Letter-Out and he was spoiled.
5 KERSHAW | Letter-Out for a street salesman. I ^
Remove one letter from each word and rearrange to apell the word
ealled for In the last column. Print the letter in center Column opposite
the word you have removed it from. If you have “Lettered-Out" correctly
ships dock here.
Answer to Yesterday’s LETTER-OUT.
L«tter-Out \
(S) RESERVE-REVERE (he made a famous ridei.
(T) FLITTER-TRIFLE (it’s of no account).
(I) LUSTIER-RESULT (an answer).
(L) RELAY-YEAR (a measure of time).
(T) STEWED-WEEDS (they are hard to stop).
'Copyright, 1938.)
Bedtime Stories
By THORNTON W. BURGESS.
*Tis little things that often seem
*.rw.c?.rc* worth * passing thought
which in the end mav prove that they
With big results are fraught.
PARMER BROWN S BOY watched
Jimmy Skunk calmly and peace
fully go his way and grinned as he
watched him. He scratched his head
thoughtfully. "I suppose,” said he,
“that that is as perfect an example of
the value of preparedness as there, is.
Jimmy knew that I knew that he was
all ready for trouble if I choose to
make it and that because of that I
wouldn't make it. So he has calmly
gone his way as if he were as much
bigger than I as I am bigger than he.
There certainly is nothing like being
prepared if you want to avoid trouble.”
Then Farmer Brown’s Bey once
more turned to the henhouse and en*
MOON MULLINS—Plushie Has Had First Hand Information
—By Willard
YOU CLAIMED Wl
MY RELATIVES
WERE STUPID
AMO ALL I SAID WAS
* LOOK AT YOUR
BROTHER 2I06Y"
THEN YOU 60
^J&ET CROSS/T^mt.
YOU KNOW GOOD
AND WELL THAT'S
A SENSITIVE SUBJECT
WITH ME/
i
HA! ME GOT 1—>/ - WELL IVE '
AWAV— NO/ SHE \ IlSfvS^dc3
H^5A[riC0RNEffeiVThS-^m GOING
iri-riTV^ ^
7 t SAY, BUDDY, HAVE A f >///
[ YOU SEEN ANYTHING OF V WHAT ARB 1
A LADY CREATIN'A / YOU TRYING q
v DISTURBANCE AROUND ) TD DO.OFFICER,
Mj _CQArg
TARZAN THE FEARLESS—
—By Edgar Rice Burroughs
L*t s go! Jen commanded impatiently. ‘‘Go?
Where are we going?" Mary asked in surprise.
"To the coast," the man answered; “it's the only
thing to do. Kagundo has probably killed Bob
and your father already. We, at least, can save
ourselves."
"We don’t know that they’ve killed Bob and
lather,” Mary objected; "let’s wait lor Tarzan.
Maybe he's bringing news.” "Tarzan!” snarled
Jeff; “I’ve been trying to tell you he’s our enemy.
I've been in this Jungle lor years. I know a lot ol
things you don't.”
Mary was unconvinced, but now Jeff clutched her
roughly by the arm. "Come on,” he barked; “you
promised to marry me. You made the bargain
yourself. Now, I’m boss, and you’re going to do
as I say.” Mary saw a glint of fury in his eyes,
and she was afraid.
<ks?sssmsssxH&\
Her first impulse was to scream, hoping that
Tarsan would hear and hurry to her. But her
better judgment counseled restraint. If the ape
man should come dashing to her, Jeff might Are
on him. Mary knew she was in Jeff’s power.
Sadly she nodded obedience.
OAKY DOAKS— A Wild Cat or Two?
«
Trademark ittllH
Por U. 8. Patent Office
WHERE IS THIS TREASURE
CHEST, AMY? -^
WELL, OAKY, ITS ABOUT >
A HALF-MILE FROM HERE
^ IN A CAVE
« 19M THr A. P. All R,*ht.
WELL, LET'5 GET OH
^ GOING BUT YOU
CAN'T GO
LIKE
that/
GOSH, THAT S RIGHT—
I MIGHT GET SHOT FOR
A GHOST
BUT WAIT TILL
VOUSEE
THE NEW
OUTFIT I'M
MAKING
FOR
you
GEE, AMY, I CAN'T BEE )( TT S
WHY YOU'RE BEING fO ONLY
30 GOOD TO ME ( THAT I
LOVE
I LOVE TO SEW
YEAH.?
SEW
WHAT?
6-21
DAN DUNN—Secret Operative 48
r1 ■■am ■ ■■ " ■■■■■■!■■■■■ ■!!*■!■ ,
—By Norman Marsh
THAT'S USING YOUR*
HEAD, IRWIN-THE
OFFICER THINKS T
WENT THE OTHER
WAV NOW TO GET
k Back to the hotel >
|YAND SEE
r FALLON-THE COPS PINCHED \
KID SLICK-YOU'VE GOT TO ]
SPRING HIM1 SURE yOU CAN- i_
<yOU'RE THE STATE’S ATTORNEY/™^
iVp-^ AINT YOU? sty?-OH-H >
_ 1/ WHAT A
K IKMTm SOCK THAT
p |p • ^GUV CAVE ME*,
BOSS, THAI WASN'T
MUCH OP A FIRE - - Y JUST THE '
THE ONLY THIN6 BURNED f MATTRESSES?
WERE THE MATTRESSES 1 THERE'S
IN FOUR ROOMS ACROSS ) SOMETHING j
THE HALL / ,_^A PHONEY f

KID HI, SLADE' ^
SLICK ! THEM COUNTRY
COPS COULDN'T
HANG ON TO MEf
WHAT'S THE DOPE >
_
MUTT AND JEFF—Mutt's "Gist" a Natural Born Strategist!
—By Bud Fisher
B/COM6 ON - - it’s
NOT TNG SIZE OF
THE MAN IN THE
FIGHT, IT'S THE \
SIZE OF THE FI6HT 1
GO OH NOW, JEFF; j W|S^ \ I
AFTER HIM.' THE wAS WITH
crowd’s WITH the crowd.'
-VYA! _
ir
JEFF, STOP STOP 'EM? i
THOSE LEFJSijjLOOK AT ME
STOPTHOSE/
********** £2“^
vSTm*Tim«m
60 OH! He's J) OCX A <
ALWAYS f {&000 tD€A!
HtTTIM’ WE.' J J
TM6 M6XTTIME HEj
*tfTS VOO, HfT f-'
BAacy
POP— A Life Filled with One Long Special Occasion
—By J. Millar Watt
I ONLY DRINK CHAMPAGNE
ON EXTRA SPECIAL
OCCASIONS !
WHAT DO YOU /
CALL C-XTRA L
SPE-CIAL -
OCCASIONS ?
WWENI I DRINK.
CUAMPA6N&!
.f-.WrtdM. »»««. >.TV Wj 6‘31 1
tered it. He looked to make sure that
no hen had been foolish enough to
go to sleep where Jimmy could have
caught her, and satisfied of this he
would have gone about his usual morn
ing work of feeding the hens but for
thing. That one thing was the china
nest-egg on the floor.
"Hello 1” exclaimed Parmer Brown’s
Boy when he saw it. "Now how did
that come there? It must be that
Jimmy Skunk pulled it out of one of
those lower nests.”
Now he knew Just which nests had
contained neat ijd and it took tout a
minute to find that none was missing
■in any of the lower nests.
“That’s queer,” he muttered. “That
egg must have come from one of the
upper nests. Jimmy couldn’t have got
up to those. None of the hens could
have kicked it o\jt last night because
they were all on the roosts when I
shut them up. They certainly didn’t
do it this ipomlng because they
wouldn’t have dared leave the roosts
with, Jimmy Skunk here. I'll have to
look into this.”
So he began with the second row of
sseta an*, looked 1b eaota. Tim he
started on the upper row and so he
came to the nest In which Unc’ Billy
Possum was hiding under the hay
and holding his breath. No, Unc’ Billy
had covered himself up pretty well
with the hay, but he had forgotten
one thing. He had forgotten his tail
and it hung just over the edge of the
nest. Of course Farmer Brown’s Boy
saw it. He couldn’t help but see it.
"Ho, ho!” he exclaimed. "Ho, ho!
So there was more than one visitor
here last night. This hen-house seems
to be a very popular place. X see that
tfas first thing for ms to do attar
f
breakfast Is to nail boards over that
hole in the floor. So it is was you.
Unc’ Billy Possum, who kicked that
nest egg out. Pound it a little hard
for your teeth, didn't you? Lost your
temper and kicked it out, didn't you?
That was foolish, Unc’ Billy, very
foolish, indeed. Never lose your tem
per over trifles. Never lose it any
way, but especially never lose it over
such a trifle as a little disappointment.
It doesn't pay. Now I wonder what I
better do with you."
All this time Unc* Billy hadn’t
"1
stand what Fanner Brown’s boy was
saying. Nor could he see what Farmer
Brown's Boy was doing, so he held
his breath and hoped and hoped that
he hadn’t been discovered. And per
haps he wouldn't have been but for
that tell-tale nest-egg on the floor.
That was the cause of all his troubles.
First ,lt had angered Jimmy Skunk, as
you remember, it had fallen on
Jimmy's head. Then it had led Farm
er Brown's Boy to look in all the
nests. It had seemer a trifle, kicking
that on ant of that nost, but see what
the result* were. Truly little thin*
often are not so little as they seem,
tcoprrieht, 1938.)
Twizzler Answer.
The robber missed $13.85. The five ,
coins were a dime, a quarter, a silver
dollar, a $2.50 gold piece and a $10
gold piece. That was 10 yean ago,
remember?
[ German driven will compete la
I this year’s isle at Man motor saeo.
•V

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