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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 26, 1938, Image 11

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GRACE GR AY HE I ONG
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Sees! Knows! Tells!
Consultation Fee, $1
Psvchic Message Council House
1100 Twelfth Street Northwest
Corner of 12th and “L”
Private parking tor patron cars.
* Telephone: Metropolitan 5234
Make the Dinner a
FAMILY AFFAIR
, * at
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The next time you plan to dine
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Chops and Ocean Fresh Seafood.
Daily and Sunday noon to closing.
OWNED AND OPERATED
BY O'DONNELL’S

Hasen Urges Express Roads,
Scattering of U. S. Buildings
,High-Speed Routes for Through Traffic
Are Proposed for Anacostia and
Rock Creek Valleys.
By JOSEPH S. EDGERTON.
Construction of high-speed through
and bypass highways in the Rock
Creek and Anacostia Valleys, scatter
ing of future Federal building con
struction throughout the local area as
widely as possible and a thorough
going development of the District,
especially in the East Washington sec
tion, under a carefully worked out,
long-range program are proposed by
Melvin C. Hazen. president of the
Board of 'District Commissioners, as a
cure for the National Capital’s pres
ent ‘‘growing pains.”
Thoroughly in accord with plans
proposed for the development of East
Washington, Mr. Hazen believes that
I much can be done through proper
I treatment of East Capitol street, the
Anacostia River Valley and the high
ground to the east to alleviate present
housing, business and traffic conges
tion in Northwest Washington.
Careful planning of every phase of
Washington's future growth is essen
tial if the city is to escape an aggra
vation of its present congestion, re
sulting largely from an unbalanced
growth to the west and north of the
Capitol, the veteran Commissioner
believes.
Wants Highways Now.
■ The type of painstaking, detailed
planning now being carried out for
the East Washington area and for
parkway connections to Baltimore, the
east and the south, utilizing the Ana
costia Parkway as a bypass route,
should be extended to the remainder
of the District and its environs, Mr.
Hazen said.
Although the Commissioner feels
that the details of any future develop
ment of Washington should be based
on thorough study of the needs of the
entire area, he is convinced that, re
gardless of whatever other develop
ment may be undertaken, a major
traffic development of the Rock Creek
and Anacostia Valleys should be car
ried forward as rapidly as passible,
not only for the benefit of local traffic
but also to expedite through traffic.
“There should be double one-way
highways up Rock Creek from K street
at least to the East-West highway,”
j Mr. Haeen said. “We should have
roadways on both sides of the creek
and should eliminate every grade
rrassing down the length of the valley.
Present Road Inadequate.
‘‘Rock Creek Valley presents a
splendid opportunity for a solution of
part of our north-south traffic prob
lem. But it calls for a great deal of
development. The present roadway
is doubled through a part of its length
but its use is limited by bottleneck
stretches of narrow, single roadway.
Even when it is limited to one-way
traffic, this roadway can't handle the
present traffic."
Two uniform-flow, one-way road
ways on opposite banks of Rock Creek
would increase tremendously the
amount of traffic which could be
handled and would prevent the neces
sity of restricting the Rock Creek and
Potomac Parkway to one-way traffic
twice a day. Further improved by the
elimination, of grade crossings, Rock
Creek Valley would in time become a
wonderful through traffic route from
the north to the south of the District,
serving both local and through traffic
at all hours in both directions, Mr.
Hazen believes.
"The topography of the valley is
ideal for this sort of development,”
Mr. Hazen said. “Conditions are per
fect for the elimination of grade cross
ings without destroying the scenic
beauty of the valley or its use for park
as well as highway purposes."
Ideal By-pass Route.
Opportunities in the Anacostia
River Valley are equally good fm*a by
pass development to the east of Wash
ington, in the opinion of the head of
the District government.
“If you wull look at the map,” he
said, pointing out on a large wall map
in his office at the District Building,
‘‘you will see that the Anacostia valley
is in the natural line of traffic flow
from New York, Philadelphia and Bal
timore and is the ideal route for by
passing through traffic from these
points to a Potomac River crossing
below Washington.”
Commissioner Hazen believes that
the Potomac could be bridged to ad
vantage from Shepherds Landing to
the northern end of Alexandria. A
bridge at this point, he said, would
not be longer than the present High
way Bridge and would have the added
advantage of more easy, favorable ap
proaches, without any bottlenecks of
the type found at the Tidal Basin
Bridge at Fourteenth street.
“This would seem to me to be the
most practical immediate solution of
the by-pass problem,” Mr. Hazen
said. “Development of this route, in
conjunction with the plan of the
National Capital Park and Planning
Commission and the State of Mary
land for a parkway to Baltimore,
should greatly improve local traffic
conditions. It would serve the double
function of a new, beautiful approach
to Washington from the North and
Northeast and of an easy, natural by
pass for heavy through traffic which
now must pass through the city,
adding to the already heavy local
traffic congestion.”
Asks Scattered Buildings.
Mr. Hazen also voiced approval of
a suggested scattering of new Federal
buildings as widely as possible through
the city as a means of preventing
further localized traffic congestion.
The National Capital Park and Plan
ning Commission has proposed the use
of East Capitol street sites for future
public and semi-public buildings. This
is in line with the original plans of
Maj. Pierre Charles I/Enfant for the
development of Washington from
nuclei formed by the squares and
circles. Under the L'Enfant plan,
public buildings would have been
located around the squares and circles,
which are the meeting points for the
avenue systems, and the city would
have grown around these centers, re
sulting in a balanced growth of the
whole metropolitan area.
Mr. Hazen, however, believes that de
velopment should be spread even
farther than any of the plans so far
proposed. He feels that the high ridge,
which forms Washington's eastern and
southeastern skyline and which forms
the route of Alabama avenue provides
a worth-while area for both public and
semi-public use and for residential
purposes.
“This ridge along Alabama avenue
is one of the most beautiful in the
District of Columbia.” Mr. Hazen ex
plained. “I am surprised that it has
not been more extensively developed in
the paSt„ it certainly should be In
cluded in any future plans for Wash
ington. especially that section north
east of the intersection of Pennsylvania
Mid Alabama avenues across from the
Port Davis Park and clow to the Fort
Dupont Park afta.”
Outlines Possible Use.
A great deal of this long ridge is
suitable for the development of better
class residential areas; most of it for
homes in the $10,000 to $15,000 class
or even higher in some sections, in
Mr. Hazen's opinion.
He admitted that it is too far from
the center of the city to be considered
for sites for buildings for the executive
departments of the Federal Govern
ment or for agencies, which function
in close co-operation with the execu
tive departments or with Congress or
the President. It is suitable, however,
for future independent establishments
such as the Bureau of Standards, the
Highway Experimental Laboratory of
the Bureau of Public Roads now being
constructed on the Mount Vernon
Boulevard at Gravelly Point, or the
Bureau of Mines Laboratory at the
University of Maryland, he said.
Commissioner Hasen feels that Fed
eral departments could go even further
than they have In the way of estab
lishing staggered hours to ease the
local traffic problem, but said he has
made no definite recommendations to
this effect.
Urges $25,000,Mg.
As a result of a recent visit he made
to New York with District Traffic
Director William A. Van Duzer and
Capt H. C. Whitehurst, director of
District highways, Mr. Hazen has put
forward the suggestion that Washing
ton could “spend profitably” at least
$25,000,000 on a new highway safety
program.
He expressed himself as greatly Im
pressed with the modem system of
safety bypass and elevated highways
already built or under construction In
the vicinity of New York. He said
that he had traveled more than 50
miles along one of these parkways
without seeing a single grade crossing.
"We are lagging far behind in neces
sary improvements of this character,”
Mr Hazen said. “It is going to be
very difficult for Washington to catch
up, but we should make the effort and
should formulate necessary plans for
a thorough development of the whole.
local area with an eye to future trends
and needs. I think it would be profit
able to spend at least $25,000,000 on
needed projects of this type.”
Mr. Hasen Is planning to discuss
with his fellow Commissioners and
local civic leaders the possibility of
asking Congress for legislation to
authorize a local bond Issue to finance
a major highway program for the
District.
STAGE DEMONSTRATION
LOS ANGELES, June 25 In ft
demonstration sponsored by 25 local
organizations, approximately a thou
sand persons, Including several of
prominence, staged a mass picketing
demonstration in front of the German
consulate here today.
Included among the pickets were
Superior Judge Robert Walker Kenny,
LAST WEEK
to ENROLL for
"Berlitz Summer Courtet"
in Froneh, Spanish, German . . . and
sa»e. POSITIVELY no enrollment for
those Special Courses shall be ac
cepted alter JULY J. Clntstt ft fn 9.
The Berllts School of Lancuaoes
II IA Connecticut Are. NA1. OttO
David V. Gill, State president of the
Young Democratic Club, end Film
Screen Writer Frank Scully.
"Hitler persecutes the Catholics In
Germany, and murders Catholics and
Jews!" and "Stop bombardment of
Spanish towns!" read some of the
banners.
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