OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 13, 1939, Image 34

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1939-01-13/ed-1/seq-34/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for B-12

New Picture Takes Cooper
Back to Cowhand Past
‘Cowboy and the Lady,’ at Palace,,
Only Mildly Diverting Comedy
Romance, Despite Stars
By JAY CARMODY.
As a playwright, S. N. Behrman says nothing, or practically nothing,
more beautifully than any other American dramatist. His prose makes,
such pleasant sound that every one forgets how much better it would be
if it made more dramatic sense. That, to be sure, is a nasty thing to be
thinking but when Mr. Berhman does not write with the proper inspira
tion for an actor like Gary Cooper, he is doing wrong by one of the
screen's finest talents. And that ls«
the way Mr. Behrman wrote in "The
Cowboy and the Lady” which opened
yesterday at Loew's Palace.
The lanky, laconic genius on the
pay roll of Samuel Goldwyn, assisted
by Merle Oberon and some compe
tent subordinates, manage to make
the comedy romance mildly divert
ing. But, as everyone knows, "mildly
diverting” constitutes a critical
cliche which should not have to be
applied to a Cooper film bearing the
hallmark of Samuel Goldwyn as
producer. It may be unreasonable,
but one expects more.
The picture takes Mr. Cooper back
to the old cowhand groove from
which he was snatched to stardom.
He is a stalwart son of the range, a
chap who has learned the facts of
life so thoroughly that its fancy side
does not appeal to him. He is so
obviously a fellow of simplicity, sin
certitv, decency and sex appeal that
when the society girl spots him. she
has to lie away her background to
get his attention. Because he likes
women who have the characteristics
of work horses, the kind that will
carry their share of the load, she
tries to be like that. Miss Oberon's
effort to live up to that ideal has
its various humorous and poignant
moments. None of them, however,
are too, too emotionally moving.
The tenser moments of the film, as
well as those embraeing some of its
more delightful off-hand comedy are
those which are left to the talents of
Mr. Cooper. The talent that makes
him the envy of such a splendid
actor as Charles Laughton bobs up
frequently in the action of "The
Cowbodv and the Lady.” He does
a fine job of being a Mr. Deeds in
sombrero and chaps in a passage in
which he is playing house, a bit of
pantomime that covers such things
as making love to his wife, pointing
out to her the beauties of nature in
Montana, and ending up, finally with
a party for his fellow cowhands, all
of whom are thoroughly convinced
V
that he Is cracked. It is a whimsical
touch that gives one a warm feeling
toward the picture for a brief space.
Another good sequence is that in
which Mr. Cooper, having been
tricked into kissing the girl and
never suspecting the treachery and
coquetry, goes back to propose mar
riage. Because the logic of a kiss
does not strike her quite the same
way, Mr. Cooper picks her up and
tosses her in the swimming pool.
No other actor could be quite so ofT
hand when presented with the same
opportunity.
H. C. Potter’s direction in scenes
like this has about it an expert
ness which is missing at other
I points along the route. It does
■ things that it should not upon oc
| casions to the comedy talents of
such people as Patsy Kelly (she’s
! a sylph now), Walter Brennan and
1 various other of the capable people
who earned Goldwyn dollars on
! which to diet.
"The Cowboy and the Lady” is
given the usual glossy Goldwyn pro
duction.
. Most of the background, which
is a bit startling for a picture with
such a title, is the rich girl's rich
home in Palm Beach. It probably is a
reflection of Mr. Berhman's (what’s
he doing here again?) penchant for
drawing rooms. He, of course, never
could be a fellow who would feel
at home on the range.
The few cowboy country shots
which do creep into the picture
are very handsome things, and
there are some reasonably exciting
excerpts from rodeo performances,
i which also increase the sagebrush
i savor of the film.
"The Cowboy and the Lady” is
vividly supplemented by a techni
color style show which ought to
be a very captivating thing for
women and very instructive for
j men who have been wondering what
women are going to look like next.
____________________ 1
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing
National—"Set to Music,” Bea
Lillie in a new musical comedy by
Noel Coward: 8:30 p.m.
Palace—"The Cowboy and the
Lady,” romantic comedy with Merle
Oberon and Gary Cooper: 12:05.
2:30, 4:50, 7:15 and 9:40 p.m.
Keith's—"Son of Frankenstein.”
In which the monster returns with
more scary doings: 11:35 am., 1:35,
3:35. 5:35, 7:35 and 9:35 p.m.
F.arle—"Say it in French,” new
romance in the comic mood: 11 a m.,
1:45. 4:30, 7:15 and 10:05 p.m. Stage
6hows: 12:45, 3:30, 6:20 and 9:05 p.m.
Capitol—"Artists and Models
Abroad,” Jack Benny's new adven
ture: 11 am., 1:40, 4:25, 7:10 and
9:55 p.m. Stage shows: 12:55, 3:40, !
6:25 and 9:05 p.m.
Metropolitan—“Smashing the Spy
Ring," the story of just that: 11:40
am., 1:40, 3:45, 5:50, 7:50 and:
9:55 p.m.
Columbia—“Out West With the
Hardys," latest tale of the doings of
the popular family: 11:25 am., 1:30,
3:35. 5:40, 7:40 and 9:45 p.m.
Little—“The Edge of the World,”
drama of a doomed people: 11 a m
1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:45 and 9:55 p.m.
Belasro—“Grand Illusion,” telling
Indictment of warfare: 4:15, 6:05, 8
and 9:50 p.m.
GOLF & TABLE
TENNIS CENTER
Coif Letson* Practice Net*
Virginia Mapes—Professional
3330 14th St. Adams 9732
Theater parking
6 P.M. TO gt
1 A.M.
CAPITAL GARAGE AS
gcj Oh. 31
SEA FOOD RESTAURANT
TOMS COVE OYSTERS
SERVED ANY STYLE
Serving Only Fresh Sea Faods.
^dinner poncing—
_____ DANCING.
Canellis Dance Studios
724 11th St. N.W. District 1673
Private Instruction in Ballroom Dancing
Dailv 10 to 10. at Reasonable Rates
Beginners Given Mr. Canellis'
Personal Attention
Group Instruction and Dancing
Tuesday and Friday Evenings. 30c and 7.3c
New Class for Beginners Starts Friday_
Enroll Now—Class or Private
Ballroom and Stage
ADUI.TS-CHILDREN
JACK ROLLINS STUDIOS
Kill Conn. Ave. DEc. .7770 •
Leroy H. Thayer
Fox Trot—Tango—Waltx—Rumba
Learn to lead well, follow easily. De
velop poise, balance and confidence In a
few lessons. Call for a guest lesson and
dance analysis—without obligation. Studios
open daily until 10 P.M.
1215 Connecticut Ave. MET. 4121
DANCE WELL
and Enjoy
Parties
The confident dancer
enjoys himself more
because of his case
while dancing. Call
Ethel M. Fistcre for
a guest lesson. Open
10 to 10.
FISTERE
1223 Conn. Ave. District 2460
Frankenstein
Monster Is
Off Again
Keith’s New Film
Has Plenty of
Scary Doings
By HARRY MacARTHUR.
If you are possessed with a yen
to have the daylights scared out of
you. R-K-O Keith’s is the place to
satisfy it. ‘Son of Frankenstein”
packs a goodly supply of chills and
more than once last night brought
frightened little squeals of half
embarrassed terror from inhabitants
of the mezzanine. It does not seem
to be quite the demon as was the
“Frankenstein” of a few years back
that inspired it. but “Son of Fran
kenstein” still is a scary enough item
to appease all, this appetite for
horror that movie audiences have
shown this season.
‘‘Son of Frankenstein” is. strange
as it may seem, the story of the son
of the Baron Frankenstein who
created the monster. From America
come the son, his wife and their
small son to move into the Franken
stein castle they have inherited.
Exploring his laboratory the baron
discovers he has inherited also the
little playmate his father made up
out of some spare parts, a strange,
bewhiskered creature having kept
the monster in a cave in a state of
suspended animation ever since it
was hit by lighting a few years back.
You do not have to be told that the
young Frenkenstein brings the
monster back to life and that it
gets loose, causing numerous com
plications, including frightening us
nigh unto a tantrum a couple of
times.
Basil Rathbone as Frankenstein,
Boris Karloff as the monster, Bela
Lugosi as the hairy fright the
monster obeys and Lionel Atwill as
ihe police inspector of the village
compose a cast well equipped to send
chills up (or down) anybody's spine.
They do here, all right. Mr. Rath
bone and Mr. Atwill especially play
all of this for all it is worth, and
maybe more. And just looking at
Mr. Karloff or Mr. Lugosi, or both, is
enough to send you into the scream
ing meamies. Jpsephine Hutchison
is on hand, too, but she does not
scare anybody, being an exceedingly
attractive note in the middle of this
business. And young Donnie Duna
gan is fine as the lad who innocently
plays with the "giant" who comes
strolling into his nursery.
The point wherein “Son of Frank
enstein” seems to fall down a bit
is its lack of action. There Is
suspense aplenty, all right, but some
times it seems to have been gained)
at the expense of movement. Di
rector Rowland V. Lee (who proved,
incidentally, / in "Love From a
Stranger” that he could whip sus
pense around) has done a fine job
of building it here, but with a touch
of that slow, plodding English man
ner at such things. It just gets tire
some sometimes, or maybe it fs
downright nerve racking to have a
suspenseful moment stretched out
until it pings an E above high C.
Complaints or no complaints, how
ever, “Son of Frankenstein” is guar
anteed to scare you.
Right Remedy
KANSAS CITY OF). —Sheriff
James L. Williams wants to keep
his county jail prisoners’ minds off
card games and gossip.
He asked for books today for the
jail library—travel books.
0
Now a Mark Twain Hero
MICKEY ROONEY
Slings a crooked pole over his shoulder and sneaks out to the old
V™9*01?-, H*is I1,01? enoaged in re-creating for the screen
Mark Twain s Huckleberry Finn,” in the M-G-M film version
of the famed sequel to ‘‘Tom Sawyer.”
Royal Title Means Nothing
To an Assistant Director
, HOLLYWOOD.
In her native Sarawak, Princess Baba need not lift a finger. Sur
rounded by luxury and servants, her slightest wish is a command.
In Hollywood, however, the princess not only can but does do a great
deal for herself—during working hours. When the sun sinks behind the
Hollywood hills she again ascends to the position she has known all her
life. The film colony, having always looked with awe upon titled per
sonages, entertains in regal style for<
Princess Baba.
Such treatment would be accorded
her 24 hours a day if it weren't for i
the fact that she's ambitious for a
screen career. That places her in a
different category during working
hours. Of course, she still is treated
with the greatest respect. But as- j
sistant directors are a pretty hard
boiled lot who are paid to see that
studio rules and regulations are car- !
ried #ut. And even a princess can’t
make them waver.
Consequently, now that she is
working with W. .C. Fields, Edgar
Bergen and Charlie McCarthy in
| Universal's “You Can't Cheat an
Honest Man,” Princess Baba must
adhere to the same rules as other !
actresses.
If she has a 9 o'clock call, she must
arise at 6 in order to dress, have
breakfast and drive to tlye studio
I from her Santa Monica home by
17:30. S
Immediate upon arriving at the
studio, she reports to the makeup
department where she punches a
| time clock. About 45 minutes are
required to make her up. Then she
spends another 45 minutes having
her hair dressed. Again she punches
a time clock so the studio has an ac
curate record of the time she spends
getting ready for work. There's an
other time clock on the set which
she must punch when she arrives
| and departs so there will be a record
_AMUSEMENTS.
i►—-— -1—
of how long she was actually on the
set.
"I knew exactly what I would have
to do before I signed the contract
for this picture,” the princess de
clares. “And it doesn't bother me
a bit. I want a screen career more
than anything else and I am per
fectly willing to work as hard or as
long as necessary to have It.
“As far as I am concerned, I’d just
as soon forget I am a princess and
be regarded only as an actress. How
ever, I have discovered that it's not
easy to shake a title in Hollywood.
People here are too title conscious.
Perhaps though if I am good enough
in You Can't Cheat an Honest Man’
to establish myself somewhat as an
actress, I can make people think of
me only professionally.”
According to advance reports emi
nating from the studio, it's very pos
sible that the Princess may see her
histrionic achievements overshadow
her family inheritance.
_AMUSEMENTS.
DAILY . . .
I mm u
L | p.n.
la o p.n.
W A P J .L Jill fM* •«> IP J I p.n.
I 1 1*11111 F Np Skatinr
m l | IjL^Ur wai ah. *
A GRAND SHOW FOR YOU
on tcroon
-oull ujr it’s the gayest
laugh-loaded romantic riot
you have ever teen.
SAY H tn
FRENCH
A Paramount Picture with
Ray Milland
Olympe Bradna
Mary Carlisle Irene Hervey
•n iti(*
Modem Dixie-Land Music
BOB
CROSBY
l HIS
, Orchestra
fraturinc
MARION MANN
All AMERICAN SWING FOUR
THE DOB CATS
also
BOB WILLIAMS
l RED DUST
TROY & LYNN
\txposiNG MiancuTffmiiiiR^^B^^
hjJBl 1 I ! I j J
a Columbia Drama with
MIPH KUMW • FAt WOT
S|^WSttm-::;::
IH t 1 ■■ |VI||||| LI ■ ■ 1 ' H&&
_■unnmu»niM,fc
Greta Garbo Wants a Change
In Title of ‘Ninotchka’
Says She Can’t Pronounce It Herself;
Friday the 13th Brings Stars*
Superstitions to Fore
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD.
Wallace Beery has Invented a new lipstick holder for his wife—to
keep the salve from getting “gooey.” (A patent has been applied for.)
. . . Greta Garbo wants to change the title of “Ninotchka.” her next
picture. She says that even she can’t pronounce it properly . . . Tom
Brown is acting as cupid for the estranged Betty Grable and Jackie
Coogan. He hopes to have them*!
living together before the end of I
the month . . . Norma Shearer has
received hun
dreds of un
friendly letters
condemning her
for receiving the
money left by
the late Irving
Thalberg. Can
she help being
rich? And I
wonder how
many of those
who d e m‘a n d
she give the
money to char
ity would do
likewise if they
were in Norma's
flhellah OrilM.
position. It is always easy to give
some one else’s money away . . .
Most pathetic sight in Hollywood:
Reginald Gardiner, with one hand
in a sling, and carrying a torch
for Hedy Lamarr with the other.
Black Friday has come to Holly
wood—Friday. the 13th. And if
you don't think ttie stars are more
superstitious than you or I, here
are Just a few of theSllogical ac
tions indulged in by movieland’s
great . . . Jeanette MacDonald
never sees a piece of string on the
set without picking it up . . .
Spencer Tracy believes that re
turning for forgotten objects brings
bad luck . . . Eleanor Powell does
not mind walking under ladders,
but will slay the person who whis
tles a single note in her dressing
room . . . Frank Morgan refuses to
say the last line of a radio play
while rehearsing. He saves it for
the actual show. (This is an old
stage superstition ! . . . Carole Lom
bard’s current good-luck charm is
a round, smooth pebble given her by
Clark Gable . . . Bette Davis re
fuses to part with any coin that is
nicked or bent . , . Priscilla Lane
thinks it is bad luck to step in
chewing gum (so do I—for my
shoes.! . . . Irene Dunne will not
have a picture on the wall of her
dressing room . . . and Douglas Cor
rigan refuses to go anywhere with
out his "good luck" leather jacket.
* * * *
I David Niven. Donald Crisp and
Basil Rathbone have formed a
I League for the Protection of Olivia
i De Havilland From Unfriendly
Males. She told them about How
! ard Hughes and they said it was
i okay to go out with him. Mr.
' Hughes, by the way, lias readied the
j point where he sends Olivia one
i dozen roses every other day. . . .
i The head man in Annabella's life is
Gene Markey, and not Tyrone
; Power, with whom she must appear
on publicity occasions, as per the
| Instructions of her studio. . . . Rob
ert Taylor has been informed by
Metro that the latter will pay for all
suits damaged during his current j
AMUSEMENTS ’ - *

trip to New York. So,'fans, get
busy. ,
Which reminds me of strange
autograph requests sometimes re
ceived by the stars. Bette Davis
was recently asked to sign her name
on two turtles, now swimming hap
pily somewhere in North Dakota.
Olivia De Havilland was asked to
autograph a large silk pillow case
by a wife who wrote that her hus
band suffered from insomnia, and
_AMUSEMENTS._
He woe a lonesome
..and a long.way from homel
She was a sophisticated
. . . looking hr some FUH1
Em
SIC • tH« Parade ef
leawty' Ivckarettet
frem »Ke U S. A
Mritti Mademeitelleft <
fr«m tkt Ini dt la
. >
BLONDES, BRUNETTES
AND *pCHH4//
Loaded with laughter . . .
tingling with tunes...
gal-orious gags!
fwMACK BENNY
Wms^Mom
m^ABMD
BOt/NO-Charley GRAPEWfN
¥ u«.7 < Fr'tz FELu-Joyce COMPTON and
.The YACHT CLUB BOYS_
S STAGE
lUND^UP lOStPHINiJjO
S"1^HUSTON »1
IE I-S|", I
, | ImHm t latiy WHALEM A4ifi« Acts I
it tvtr-popular ayafuls kA
WALE CapHohDANCERSw'
in Legs .. * Hawaiian L antasy"
.“Color Rhapsody* ^^W^F
■WIGHT SHOW «Js,ATTTS,,,DU*srC0MN,y„s?!
TODAY! GOOD NEWS!
The howling Hardys
are BACK again...!
EXQy^u 18
25c TO. 5:30 P.M.
40c NIGHTS
she was sure the proximity of
Olivia's name would cure him! . , .
Sight of the week. Cecil B. De
Mille directing “Union Pacific’’ while
lying flat on a stretcher, with two
internes and two nurses (pretty) in
attendance. Nearby are a wheel
chair and a couple of crutches. Out
side is a de luxe ambulance. Is this
a supercolossal De Mille production?
Robert Montgomery was hanned
a script by a producer. “Well?”
queried the latter after Bob had
turned the last page, "What do you
think of it?” “Do you really want
me to tell you?” asked the actor.
“Sure,” said the executive. “All
right,” replied Bob. “Any one con
nected with this picture—even re
motely—should be taken out and
shot.” And he handed back the
script.
(Copyright. 1939. by tbg North American
Nowaptper Alliance. Inc.)N
_AMUSEMENTS.
Caaatltallaa Hall. Naxt Tata. Era , »:**
RICHARD KATHRYN
CROOKS £ MEtSU
Ttaar—Matraaalltaa Optra—Caatralt*
la Jaiat Baaltal—fl.U, It.to. la*, tax.
Mr*. Paraar'a. ISOO O IDr«»p«> SA. tIM
Caaatitatlaa Hall, laa. Aft.. Jaa M
MENUHIN
WDrl4>FftRiDRa VI•llnlat—In ImHiI
tl.gfl. »t.to, Mra. Ppr—r’», IXiWG
BEAK ALEXANDER
KERENSKY
Print MinUter it Rmila. 1«I7
THURS.. JAN. 19 HStTalsorM.
Will Hitler Go to War?
** Democracy and Soviet Russia Alter
the Munich Puct."
Was the Russian Revolution a Jewish
Conspiracy?
new. Edmund A. Walsh, 1. J,
will preside.
Reserved Heals, Bile, 81.10. 81.35. 81.35
T. Arthur Smith Bureau, 810 O St.
Choice Seats Available for
STUDENTS' CONCERT
Notional Symphony
Hans Kindler. Candaetar
CONSTITUTION HALL
11 A.M. TOMORROW
Tickets, 'Ibc and r>Oc. on Sale at Hall
Af?er 10 A.M. Saturday
■—»asa65fl
>2 tiu s ii
I V 'irTTlX «| '14 *W *IUMH II
|HliSD^?ASSM^
TRANS-LUX M* >!!«.■*
•NAVY PLANES IN MASS; STRANGE I
CASE OF TOM MOONEY; MOTHER- I
GOOSE GOES HOLLY. i—;-R
>* WOOD.
SHORT SUBJECTS |/j =|
Silver Roladrome
Armory, Silver Spring, Md.
Roller Skating trerg Evening Except
Monday 7:30 to II *0—Mat 1:30 to EMO
Etna. Feliae-Fretectee Park ink
Admission_10c
Skates_35c
Phone Shop. 1506 S. S. 761
Saeelai rataa U akatint aartiea on Tara,
ant WeO.
AMUSEMENTS.
Tonight ot 8:10
Next Mat. Tomer. ot 1:30
EATRICF LILLIE
_ & fteur Vevue by
NOEL COWARD
Remaining grata Available—8Tea. Only
—83.30 (Inelnding Tax)
NEXT WEEK BEG. MON. EVE. AT 8:30
—SEAT SALE NOW—
HELEN HAYES
moCILRIRT MILLIR'S
Victoria Regina
■eata Available—Erex. Only 81.30
TODAY... 'V
is FRIDAY the 13*
what a day to aaa tho I.
ALL NEW and Horrific V
SON of Jt
FRANKENSTEIN''
I"4 Basil rathbonT^
Boiis KARLOFF
Bela LUGOSI
Lionel ATWILL
JOSEPHINE HUTCHINSON
MOTE . . Tomorrow SATURDAY
I Doors Opan at 9:15 A. M.
rwsT mow si 130 a. m. .
DC I AC PH °PP White House
DELAdUU NAtionai 0149
IMPROVE YOURSELF!
Gain POISE—Perfect DICTION.
Train for a CAREER.
WINTER TERM beiini
NEXT WEEK.
Courses, $30—$50—$75
GREET
DRAMATIC ACADEMY
The La Solle—1028 Conn. Ave.
Tel. Me. 2ir»l
MARJORIE LAWRENCE
Leading Soprano of
Metropolitan Opera
Soloist With
NATIONAL SYMPHONY
Hans Kindler. Conductor
CONSTITUTION HALL
Sun., Jan. 15, 4 P.M.
Ticket*. 50c to V.\ Now on sale at box
office. Julius Garflnckel «fc Co. Store..
Na. T31€>.
C. C. Cappel. Mgr.
API HE MV Of Perfect Send Pheteelej
AlAUUni 8th at O 8.E.
K. Lawrence Phillips' Theatre Beautiful
Continuous Prom ft:30 P.M.
“THE LIVES OF A BENGAL
LANCER,”
With GARY COOPER Also
“CONVICTED.”
ATI AC 1331 1 31 N.r.. Atl. 830*
A1 LAj Matinee. 1 P.M.
Double Feature
ROY ROGERS in
“COME ON, RANGERS.”
_and _”FIVE_OF_A_KIND. ”_
CAROLINA 11 *k A*r-C#ndi tinned *'*'
ERROL FLYNN In “FOURS A CROWD.”
and "HUNTED MEN.”_
PIDP1 C Penna. Are. at Slat St.
I.IKLLL Bane of Mirraahanir Sound
LUTSE RAINER. FERNAND ORAVET.
■ THE GREAT WALTZ." News. 7 and
_»_P M.__
PANPDCCC S931 Nlehola Are. 8.E.
lUNllKbOO Air-Conditioned
“IP I WERE KINO.” with RONALD COL
MAN and FRANCES DEE._
IYIIMDADTAN 1343 Wiaconaln Are.
IHJfflDAn I UK Air-Conditioned
BETTY DAVIS and ERROL FLYNN in
_“THE_8I8TER8"_News_and_Comedy.
CAIDI AU/N ANACOST1A. D C.
fAIKLAWn Air-Conditioned
FRED MarMURRAY and RAY MILLAND
in ”MEN_WITH WINGS”_
i inn s—17 m st. ».».
LIUU Double Featore
MICKEY ROONEY in •'STABLEMATES."
and •'WESTERN JAMBOREE."_
IITTI V 008 Ptb 8t. N.W.
LI I I LL Air-Cunditianed
“The Edge of the World.”
_Also “ADVENTURES OF CHICO "_
DDINPECC in* B st. N.E.
rnintUd Double Feature.
GEOROE RAFT In "SPAWN OF THE
NORTH.” WILL ROGERS in “COUNTY
CHAIRMAN."_
WANTON and c 8ti. N.E.
jIAHIUn Finest Seand Eaalaiaent
Continuous From S:.tO P.M
MARTHA RAYS snd BOB HOPE lit
“GIVE ME A SAILOR.”
• Also
"My Old Kentucky Home.”
ARLINGTON. VA.
WILSON oiTOvtt.
JAMES CAGNEY In "ANGELS WITH
DIRTY FACES."
y^RIN°
FALLS CHURCH. VA^
STATE ”WW° LEE
ROBT. DONAH , ..g™*.*^** .
ln I DLES. ’ and "LAST
‘ THE CITADEL." I EXPRESS. ’
nnnrt Bethe'da. Md. Wl. A8ft8.
DvItU Double Feature—P>-11
JAMES NEWILL In "RENFREW OF
ROYAL MOUNTED." All Native Cast
in "ZAMBOANGA."_
HIPPODROME Double* Feature I
DENNIS O’KEEFE In "VACATION
FROM LOVE.” PAT O'BRIEN ln
U "BAN QUENTIN." Cont. 3-11._
£5 CAMF.0 UT7m$SZ?-m
9 W. BEERY. M. ROONEY ln " ST ABLE
■J MATES." At 8. 7:15. »:3ft.__
>* ARCADE Today. I
r.t CLARK GABLE. MYRNA LOY In
HJ "TOO HOT TO HANDLE." At fl:*5.
Z JR1V_
aDirUMnMn ALEXANDRIA, va.
KlLnmUnU Today-Tomor
M] F. BARTHOLEMEW. JUDY GARLAND
•* ln "LISTEN. DARLING."_
a DECn ALEXANDRIA VA.
w ItLJuU Today-Tomor.
a ERROL FLYNN. GEORGE BRENT In
2 "DAWN PATROL.”
• S Free Parkins Space—800 Cars.
f MILO ROCKVILLE. MD. I
t ROBT. DONAT in
"THE CITADEL.”
_At 7, B:"0.__
MARLBORO **er Mariltora. Md I
FERNAND GRAVET and
MILIZA KORJUS in
“GREAT WALTZ.”
_At 7:05. »:"0. __
STATE-BETHESDA SaUK-fiT
TYRONE POWER and LORETTA YOUNO ln
"SUEZ.”
At 8:40 and 8:14. Added abort*.
I
*3
c .
^ Q
•9
M O
C
»a
"3
K
I
a «
BS
oQ
Be
%)
?I

tJ K
w a.
o
in
AMBASSADOR a:\ft fi®\
Matinee 1 FtM.
LUISE RAINER FERNAND OR A VET
in "THE GREAT WALTZ, At. 1:20.
2:2ft. 5:2ft. ?::;0. 0 2 V News._
AVE. GRAND Lincoln 71 f>0
Mat. 1 P.M.
BELA LUGOSI in 'DRACULA" At
1. 3:35. t»:15. 8:55. BORIS KARL
OFF in "FRANKENSTEIN At 2:15,
4:45. 7:3(t, 10:15. Short Subject.
DCUEDI V 15th * E N.t.
DC.VC.KLI u. 3300 Mat. 1 P.m.
Parkins SDace Available to Patrons.
TOMMY KELLY. ANN GILLIS in
"PECK S BAD BOY WITH CIRCUS."
At 1. 2:45_4 3(1. 6:15. s._9:50._
TAI VFBT 7324 Wisconsin Arc. »
tALVCIU Wo. 2.715. Mat. I P.M.
REGINALD OWEN. LYNNE CARVER
ill "CHRISTMAS CAROL." At i.
2:40, 4:25, ii: 15._8._!l: 15._
rCNTDAI 1-5 Ninth St. N.W.
V-Cl! I KAL Met.2811. Open 11 A M.
"HARD TO GET." with DICK
POWELL. OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND.
At 11. 1:05. 3:1 5 _5:20. 7:30._0:40.
PFNN 050 Pa. Atc. S.F.
rc.1111 Lincoln 7170. Mat. 1 P.M.
"DRUMS.” in Technicolor. with
SABU. RAYMOND MASSEY. At, 1 :25.
3:2(*. 5:20. 7:20. 9:25._Cartoon._
SHERIDAN Steffi.
CONSTANCE BENNETT. VINCENT 4
PRIC E in SERVICE DE LUXE.” At
1. ;i:oft. ft: 15._7:25. 9:20.__
CII Vrp Ga. Are. * Colearllle Pike
JIL.V CIV Shep. ftftOO. Mat. 1 P.M.
Park.ns Space Available to Patrons.
ANNE SHIRLEY in "GIRLS’ SCHOOL”
At J. 2:4.7. 4 TV tt:2(>. 8:10. 10.
Tivni I Mth St. St Park Rd. N.W
11 YULI Co 1800. Mat. I P.M
REGINALD OWEN. LYNNE CARVER
in Charles Dickens "CHRISTMAS
CAROL." At I:5n. .*1:50. 5:50. 7:50.
9:50. Short Sub.ect.
YTDTAU7IU Conn Ave. A Newark
uriuwn Cl. 5100. Mat. 1 P.M.
Parkinsr Spac»- Available to Patron
FREDRIC MARCH. VIRGINIA BRUCE
in ‘THERE GOES MY HEART.” Al*
1:40. .2:40 5:25. 7 :25. 0 25. Dis
ney's "Ferdinand the Bull.”
Theaters Marine Eve. Performances
APOLLO
CONSTANCE BENNETT. VINCENT
PRICE in "SERVICE DF LUXE." At.
fi:I5. 7:50. 0:40 Short.
AVALON Rfi,2Ct?:n7.^NW
ANNE SHIRLEY* in "GIRLS’ SCHOOL.”
At 0:15. 8. 0:55. Short.
COLONY 493\&:^>w-'
ANNE SHIRLEY in "GIRLS' SCHOOL."
At 0:15. 8. 0:45.
HHMF i» c st. n.e. n
nIf ITlCi Atlantic 8188.
• NANCY DREW. DETECTIVE." with
BONITA GRANVILLE At fl 35.
8:15, 9:55. Short Subject.
cAvnv 3o-i° i4th st. n.w.
■3AVUI Col 4908
TOM KEENE in "WHERE THE
TRAIL DIVIDES." At «:50, 8:25.
10:15._
crrn mr Ga. An.,
“"VU Silver Borina. Md.
Shep. 2540 Parkina Spare
■lANE WirKERS in "ALWAYS IN
TROUBLE." At fl:30. 8:20. 10:05.
TAITHMA 4tb and Itatternpt St.,
1AMIIHA Ge 4312. Parkina Spate.
BOB BURNS. IRVIN_8 COBB in
"ARKANSAS TRAVELER.” At fl 15.
8. 9:50. Short Subject.
YORK A”R.n*d. sSr*"*"
BOB BURNS. IRVIN S COBB in
-ARKANSAS TRAVELER.” At 8:15.
8._9:50._Also_8hnrt._
NEWTON
“MEN WITH WINGS,”
FRED MacMURRAY. RAY MILLAND.
Matinee at 1 P.M.
JESSE THEATER
“IF I WERE KING,”
RONALD* COLMAN. FRANCES DEX.
SYLVAN 'rV*wL .
“BROTHER RAT,”
WAYNE MORRIS. PRISCILLA LAN*.
PALM THEATER *%£"•
“SUEZ,”
TYRONE POWER, LORETTA YOUNG.

xml | txt