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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 05, 1939, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1939-03-05/ed-1/seq-8/

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Community Center
Department Issues
Quarterly Magazine
Article on Children's
Federal Gallery Is
A Feature
A panorama of the activities of
Community Center Department
young people—drama, music, ath
letics, crafts and club life—is in
cluded in the Community Center
Quarterly, the winter issue of which
was circulated this week end.
One of the highlights in the mag
azine, distributed among the Gov
ernment departments, public schools,
center unit supervisors and hun
dreds of private homes, is an article
on the Children’s Federal Gallery,
established by the District’s Federal
Art Project of the W. P. A. The
article was written by Philip F. Bell,
gallery directoc.
The periodical is printed at the
Abbot Vocational School at Seventh
and O streets N.W., and contributing
editors include department officials,
playground supervisors and young
sters who enjoy the facilities offered
by the department.
The editor of the publication, Mrs.
Cora Wells Thorpe, describes in the
current issue the “Only Gypsy
School in the World.” She learned
of the unusual school, located on the
Danube River at Ozhorod, during a
visit in Prague last summer.
A resume of the work of the vari
ous centers throughout the city is
described in a special section of the
magazine. For the first time, a short
story written by a participant in the
department's writers’ project is in
cluded in the current quarterly. The
story is “Small Town,” by Julia
Hoopes. Other aritcles describe fu
ture projects of the department,
looking to enlargement of present
facilities and installation of new
ones.
Goodwill Industries
School Graduates 9
Nine students from eight States
received certificates in graduation j
exercises of the National Training
School of Goodwill Industries yes
terday afternoon at 1218 New Hamp
shire avenue N.W. Ernest Humphrey
Daniel, president of the Board of
Trustees, presided.
Graduates were Warren M. Banta
of Atlanta, Ga.: Oliver J. Gwin,
Danville, 111.; Robert S. Lijestrand,
Lowell, Mass.; Frazier McNeill,
Memphis, Tenn.; G. W. Gillespie,
Roanoke, Va., who spoke on behalf
of the class; A. J. Hollingsworth,
Norfolk, Va.; Sidney Rumsey, Tulsa,
Okla.; John B. Longo, Birmingham,
Ala., and Roland D. Elderkin, Cleve
land, Ohio.
An address was made by Linton
M. Collins, special assistant to the
Attorney General. Mrs. Bancroft C.
Davis presented certificates and Dr.
E. J. Helms, president of the National
Association of the Industries, gave
the benediction.
Council Will Meet
The Georgetown Neighborhood
Council of the Washington Council
of the Social Agencies will meet at
3:30 pm. Tuesday in the Georgetown
Branch Library, Wisconsin avenue
and R street N.W. The meeting
has been called by Miss Susan R.
Craighill, chairman.
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Victor — Blue Bird — Vocalian
Columbia—Brunswick—Decca.
Charge accounts invited
House Member's Daughter
Played Pro Basket Ball
Betty Jensen Prefers
Sports to Social
Activities
One of the recent additions to the
list of congressional daughters is a
19-year-old who would rather toss
a basket ball than dance and prefers
bowling to pouring tea any day.
She is slim, attractive Betty Jen
sen, daughter of Representative Ben
F. Jensen of Iowa.
For two years a professional bas
ket ball player with a business girls’
team in Des Moines, she looks
strictly feminine and hides, or just
doesn't have, the bulging muscles
reputed to go with girl athletes.
Although she failed to do so her
self, Miss Jensen’s advice to girls
is to limit their basket ball playing
to high school games.
“Professional basket ball is too
rough.” she explained, "and the
schedule is too strenuous. We played
57 games a season, practiced three
hours a day and had two Sunday
games a week. And we were play
ing boys’ rules part of that time.”
Likes All Sports.
Miss Jensen loves sports—all of
them. When she was in high school,
she used to caddy for her father.
Now they play golf together. She
spends her summers fishing, loves
to hunt, roller skates frequently, is
always organizing bowling parties,
though she can't find many takers
among the other congressional
daughters.
Because she thinks women have
a “funny attitude" toward sports,
she'd rather play with men. They
take sports seriously, while girls just
play for the pastime, she explained.
She went to business school just
to play on the team. It was called
the “A. I. B. Typists" and boasted
two all-Americans, Myrtle Fisher
and Elvira Lindgren. Five feet ten
inches tall, though she doesn’t look
it. Betty played forward. Her moth
er couldn’t object, she explained, be
cause she had once coached a basket
ball team herself.
Has to Be Careful.
Her spine was injured in one of
the games and though she played in
a sectional tournament a month
later, she has to be careful. Even
so, she couldn't resist tossing a bas
ket ball the other day when she
visited a Georgetown school. Shoot
Betty Jensen practices putt
ing into a drinking glass.
—Star Staff Photo.
ing from the balcony in high heels,
she made a basket.
“You learn a lot about girls’ per
sonalities when you play basket
ball,” she reflected. "Some girls can
take it good naturedly when you out
point them, but others—well, they’re
not that way.”
A very forthright young lady,
Betty had something to say about
the attitude of congressional daugh
ters on dates.,
“Most of them feel the boys have
to spend a lot of money on them
when they go out,” she declared. "I
think they- should be more con
servative in their tastes. Most of
the boys are working and they can't
afford it.”
Otherwise, she thinks Washington
is lovely, though the public buildings
‘sort of confuse me.”
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PLUMBERS In D. C.,
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Law As
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tajar the eaaafart and
aniiaaited aerrlce ef Ihlt
flneat heatlns plant at the
preaent law prleea! tip to
l 3 Teara to Pap!
\ Free Estimates!
Captains in Drive
For Boys' Club Ask
Citizens to Aid
Lt. Col. Harvey Miller
And P. W. Hammock
Make Appeals
The campaign of the Metropolitan
Police Boys’ Club to raise $75,000
entered its second week today, and
team captains urged Washingto
nians to aid the clubs in providing
recreation facilities for underprivi
leged boys of the Capital.
Lt. Col. Harvey Miller, secretary
of the District Boxing Commission
and leader of Group 10, reminded
that the police "would rather ‘shoot
square’ with the underprivileged boy
today than shoot it out with what
he might be later on.”
Paul W. Hammack, insurance man
and captain of Group '8, declared,
"The most amazing thing is that
the Metropolitan Police Boys’ Clubs
give these youngsters so much for
only $5 a year of citizen contribu
tion.”
Similar reasons for their interest
in the drive were expressed by the
other volunteer team leaders.
Dr. Leon S. Gordon, director of
the clubs’ medical clinic, will be the
principal speaker Tuesday at a "pep"
luncheon of the solicitors to be held
in the Cosmos Club.
Campaign Director L. Gordon
Leech announced gifts of 1100 or
more from:
joe Morrison, L. uorrin Strong,
James A. Councilor, David H. Blair,
The Evening Star Newspaper Cc„
the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea
Co., Theodore W. Noyes, Pioneer
Laundry Corp., Mary E. Stewart,
the Washington Post, E. K. Houser,
Shoreham Hotel, Christian Heurich:
George D. Homing, Inc.; Occidental
Hotel, Super Concrete Corp., Alice
Maury Parmelee, Ray F. Garrity,
John A. Remon, James E. Colli
flower, c. B. Dulcan, sr., and Morris
Cafritz.
Campaign headquarters also an
nounced that Maj. Ernest W. Brown,
supreintendent of police and founder
of the clubs, will speak in behalf
of the drive at 8 p.m. Friday before
the Brookland-Woodridge Business
Association in John Burroughs
School.
A fllm showing activities at the
clubs' camp at Scotland, Md., will
be shown, as well as a motion pic
ture sponsored by the Federal Bu
reau of Investigation dealing with
the prob’em of Juvenile delinquency.
Waller Calls Meeting .
Arthur Waller, chairman of the
U Street Neighborhood Council of
the Washington Council of Social
Agencies, has called a meeting of
that group for 7:30 o'clock Tuesday
night in the Gamet-Patterson Com
munity Center, Tenth and U streets
N.W,
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NO CASH DOWN i
These values on sale at
814-816 F ST. N.W.
Phiico $00,00
Regular S95_1. 00
Emerson $4 7.08
Regular S44.9S.... | f
Emerson mauau ne
Radio A Phnnorr.ph SOC.95
Regular SS9.95.... AU
Stromberg
Carlson SCI.80
Regular S129.9S... U |
Stromberg Carlson $00.00
/fejB/ar S165.U0
Zenith $10.98
Regular $49.95_ | 9
General Electric SOC.95
Regular $59.95.... CO
RCA Victor SCO.80
Regular $159.50... 00
Philco $00.80
RCA Victor $07.98
Regular $69.95_ £, f
RCA Victor Aa
Radio-Phonograph S91.i
Regular $79.95.... 0 I
Motorola SC 1.98
Regular $154.95... 0 I
General Electric $70.88
Regular S199.9S... * f .
RCA Victor . __ _
Radlo-Phonocraph dn g .00
Regular S117.S0... lfi
Sonora ..A
Ridlo-Phonorraph afcP.Ml
Regular S149J0... 510
These values on sale at
3038 14th ST. N.W.
Crenow $40.98
Regular S109.9S... tV
Stromberf
Carbon $Cli80
Regular S129J0— if I
Grunow $1*0)89
Regular $159.50— Ov
Grunow $07*98
Regular $69.95- m I
Motorola $OE.98
Regular $S9.95- VW
RCA Victor $17.98
Regular $44.95- I I
K»dl«-r*honorr»®h $ E1 ■ 80
Regular $129JO... 9 I
RCA Victor $07,98
Regular 269.95- 4 I
Zenith $01,98
Regular 279.95.... V I
Philco $17*18
Regular 242.95.... I I
General Electric $Ofi.95 I
Regular 259.95.... 4U
Sonora
Radio A Fhonorraph
Regular 214910...
These values on sale at
3107-09 M ST. N.W.
Gruaow S4O.80
Regular S109J0... *#0
Motorola S 71.98
Regular S179.95... | I
Stromberg Carbon SCC.OQ
Regular S16S..L.. 00
General Electric S4C,95
Regular S59.95.... 40
RCA Victor S1C.98
Regular S39.9S.... | 0
General Electric $Ofla98
Regular S99J9S-...
PhUco SAC.85
Regular S114J0...
General Electric
Regular f59.95._
Sonora a ^
Kadlv Mi PhnnA.raah ffc 1180
Regular 2129JS0... V |
Motorola S4C>98
Regular SS9.95.... 05J
RCA Victor C| 7,98
Regular $44.95_ | f
Sonora $00.98
Regular 199.95.... 0“
These values on sale at
2015 14th ST. N.W.
RCA Victor SCQ.80
Re tutor S159.S0 DO f
RCA Victor C| 7,98
Re tutor S44.9S.... If
Philco $10.98
Regular $49.95.... | $
Pbiico $09.00
Regular $230.
General Electric $01 >98
Regular $79.95.... 0 I
General Electric $00,98
Regular $99.95.... Oaf
Grnnow $00.00
Regular $200. OU
Radio * Phonorraoh $C1 a80
Regular $12950... V I
Stromberg
Carbon $E1.80
Regular $12950... V I
Phiico 8CQ.80
Regular $17450... 09
RCA Vietor . SQC.98
Regular $»9.95.... 09
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These values on sale at
IIM N ST. NiE.
RCA Victor SI 0.98
Regular S44.9S....
General Electric SOI >98
Regular V9.95—. 01
Philco
Regular S114.50_
Zenith $07.98
Regular S49.95_ £ f
Stromberg Carbon Sfifi.00
Regular S16S. QD
Motorola S£1.98
Regular S1S4.9S... 0 I
RCA Victor S£0.80
Regular S159J0... 00
Stromberg
*££%»_ ‘SI-80
Philco $40,00
Regular t95. 00
• RCA Victor $17,98
Regular S443S.... | f
General Electric S40>95
Regular SS9.9S.... 40
Sonora
ltll« a fhonorrpph
Regular SI29JO..
MM o n t JMi ss This Great Sale Event —Come Early

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