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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 17, 1939, Image 44

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Musical Comes to Life
When Mickey Takes Over
‘Babes in Arms,’ at the Palace,
Presents Him in a Constant
Succession of Surprises
By JAY CARMODY.
It was a bright day for the film musical when Metro-Goldwyn
Mayer decided the cure for its pernicious anemia was a Mickey Rooney
transfusion. As a result, the movie form which has been lying at death’s
door bursts forth with volcanic vitality in “Babes in Arms,” new attrac
tion at the Palace. It may not be art, in fact no one pretends that It
is, but the people who know they like Mickey must think of him here
oikii no mi. mnitci uiuig Cl •
universal genius the screen has yet
unveiled. In “Babes in Arms,” he
acts, he sings, he dances, he plays
piano, pounds a drum, beats a bass
fiddle, directs a kid musical, imi
tates Clark Gable, Lionel Barry
more, Eddie Leonard and President
Roosevelt. In fact he does every
thing but explain the Einstein
theory and write Walter Lippman’s
column.
A better vehicle for demonstrat
ing the versatility of the gnome
like lad could not have been chosen
than this stage hit written by
Richard Rogers and Lorenz Har*.
end rewritten by Jack McGowan
and Kay Van Riper. It goes the
limit in giving a youth of Mickey’s
capabilities his fling, and if the
result leaves him anywhere below
the top in box office standing, the
public demand for the boy has
been grossly miscalculated.
There, are other youngsters, nat
urally, in “Babes in Arms,” a tal
ented slew’ of them headed by
Judy Garland, Betty Jaynes, June
Preisser and Douglas McPhail. All
of them enter into the spirit of the
thing with an irresistible exuber
ance, but for all their skin and
appeal, they make the merest
challenge to the complete dom
inance of M-G-M’s most versatile
juvenile. Were it not for him, and
that succession of surprises which
he donates so emphatically, “Babes
In Arms” would be just another
musical.
* * * *
c,nanges were necessary in me
original to turn the piece into a field
day for Mickey. Among the other
ends they accomplished were to give
It a stronger story structure than it
enjoyed when it was charming the
hearts of New Yorkers with its
bright spirit of youth. The current
tale presents Mickey as the ring
leader of a gang of vaudeville chil
dren, kids bent upon turning their
lovfc for the stage into a means of
rescuing themselves and their has
been parents from the degradation
Of poverty.
Only two of the original tunes,
•Where or When” being the impor
tant one, remain in the film adapta
tion. A scad of new numbers, all in
the ebullient spirit of youth, have
been interpolated. They are the
creations of such talented people as
Nacio Herb Brown, Harold Arlen,
E. Y. Harburg and Arthur Freed.
The list includes everything from a
vigorous march tune to a torch num
ber, the latter designed especially
for Miss Garland.
Mickey’s surprises begin with his
piano playing, which is good even
though it may be faked, proceed
from there to his revelation of talent
as vocalist, bull fiddle beater and
subsequently a dancer. Miss Gar
land and McPhail, the latter a ca
pable baritone, can sing rings around
Mickey, but that is unimportant. It
is unimportant, too, that Miss Preis
ser can dance him to the sidelines
in about a minute of competition.
The thing that counts is that Mickey
is creditable in every one of his
manifestations of versatility.
* * * *
He gets his largest and most ap
preciative laughs, logically enough,
when he drops into his imitations.
Those of Gable and Lionel Barry
more, both of them very convinc
ing things and full of humor, oc
cur in a single sequence, a comic
ally conceived affair in which he
is trying to show how Anthony
would have wooed Cleopatra if he
had had the advantage of watch
ing Gable work. The impersonation
of President Roosevelt’s fireside
chat style is good within the limits
of its timidity, not quite so good,
believe it or not, as Judy's take-off
of Mrs. Roosevelt.
In making “Babes in Arms,”
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer did a quite
happy thing in digging down into
the ruins of vaudeville to rescue
some of those who once were its
proudest artists. A number of old
timers whose faces are familiar have
contributions to make, minor ones
naturally, to the more serious* side
of the story.
As befits a musical starring Mick
ey, “Babes in Arms” has been given
a costly, but not unduly lavish,
setting. Director Busby Berkeley
showed a fine restraining hand in
this department right up to the
final scene which represents a re
production of the east front of the
Capitol building, the steps of which
make a fine setting for the show’s
finale.
MARRY ME, MY QUEEN—For all I want is half your throne.
Bette Davis and Errol Flynn have some tender, some bitter and
some boisterous moments in their portrayal of the love story
which is "The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex.” The tech
nicolor production now is in its second week at the Earle Theater.
Marx Freres Join Circus
And Are Mad There, Too
Trio’s New Comedy, at the Capitol,
Has Them in That Old Daft Mood;
Gene Ford’s Bright Idea on Stage
By HARRY MhcARTHIR.
If you have a penchant for songs about tatooed ladies, the Capitol
is the place for you this week. Groucho Marx sings one in “At the
Circus,” latest cinematic symphony in double entendre that the Marxes
have slipped past the Hays Office, and George Beatty sings one in “Swell
HoteV,” the stage show Gene Ford has written and produced. Mr. Marx’s
is the better, no doubt because it has Groucho singing it, but both are
daffy enough and one might say*-—
the totooed lady situation is well
covered.
A couple of other songs are sung
amj some other situations are in
hand before “At the Circus” has
run its frenetic course and its, to the
Marx fans, highly agreeable course.
The tale of a once wealthy but
now disinherited lad, in love with
a pretty girl and at the same time
about to lose his circus to the vil
lain to whom he owes $10,000, is
about as conventional as any mo
tion picture plot could be, of course.
But this is of no consequence, for a
plot, no matter how weak through
age and vitamin deficiency it may
be, is just something for the Marx
freres to kick gayly aside.
Harpo, Groucho and Chico, we
are sure, could make something
hilarious out of a scene so common
place, say, as three men boarding a
bus to go home to dinner. Inanity,
utter foolishness, is the secret of it
all. There is that scene where
Chico, guarding the door of the
circus train, refuses admittance to
Groucho, whom he himself has sum
moned, because Groucho doesn’t
have the proper badge. And there
are other moments equally foolish
and equally hilarious.
“At the Circus” is, to be sure
like other Marx Brothers films, just
an hour and a half vaudeville show
on celluloid, with one stellar act, the
members of which leave the stage
only long enough to rest and per
mit the audience to rest up for the
next assault. But, happily, these
mad, delirious Marxes, unlike some
comics, are enough. Marx Brothers
devotees want nothing more in one
film than Groucho’s confident mas
tery of any situation, Harpo’s top
notch pantomiming, Chico’s occa
sional flights into intelligence which
are so happily balanced by his us
ual complete lack of it.
So, incidentally, it probably does
not much matter who the othei
people in “At the Circus” are, un
les you want to know they are Mar
garet Dumont, who is such an able
foil for Groucho; Florence Rice
Eve Arden, Nat Pendleton and Ken
ny Baker, who would still be a bet
ter singer than a cinema leading
man even if he couldn't sing sc
sweetly.
And as a postscript it should be
added that the Marx musical tal
ents are not forgotten this time:
In addition to Groucho’s song (?)
there's a session with Chico at the
piano and one with Harpo on his
harp.
* * * *
This is an ingenious idea Gene
Ford has had for this week’s Capitol
stage show; not a brand-new one
perhaps, but one which has about 11
enough of novelty to make it practi
cally a manifestation of genius ir
the vaudeville business. Mr. Fore:
has given his revue Just enough oi
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing
National — “Farm of Threi
Echoes,” new play with Ethel Bar
rymore; 8:30 pm.
Earle—“The Private Lives o:
Elizabeth and Essex,” with Beth
Davis as the British queen; 10:3<
am., 1:20, 4:15, 7:05 and 10 pm
Stage shows: 12:20, 3:15, 6:10 am
8:05 pm.
Palace—“Babes in Arms,” Micke;
Rooney goes musical: 10:30 am.
12:40, 2:55, 5:10, 7:25 and 9:40 pm
Keith’s—“Allegheny Uprising,” ex
citement in pre-Revolution history
11:15 am., 1, 2:45, 4:30, 6:15, 8:0!
and 9:50 p.m.
Capitol—“At the Circus,” Mar
madness under the big-top: 11 am
1:45, 4:35, 7:20 and 10:10 p.m. Stagi
shows: 12:45, 3:35, 6:20 and 9:li
pm.
Columbia—“Hollywood Cavalcade,
cinema’s history of itself: 11:15 a.m
1:20, 3:25, 5:30, 7:35 and 9:40 p.m.
Metropolitan—“Mr. Smith Goes h
Washington,” Frank Capra looks a
the local scene: 11:25 a.m., 1:55,4:25
6:50 and 9:35 pm.
*
i
continuity and cohesiveness, staging
it all in one set, the lobby of this
"Swell Hotel.” And just as soon as
the people involved have the Ford
script rolling glibly from theii
tongues this should be a bright
affair.
Guests who turn up in the lobbj
include such people as Don Zelaya
the Five Jewels and Rita and Ed
Oehmans. For bellhops there are the
20 Rhythm Rockets, who leave ofl
their bellhopping on occasion foi
some neat precision dancing; the
desk clerk is George Beattie, whc
leaves off his desk-clerking for a
comedy moment, and the telephone
operator is Kay Mayfield, who alsc
sings.
Best of the performances staged
in the lobby of Mr. Ford’s hostelry is
Mr. Zelaya’s, both when he is at the
piano and when he is lecturing about
jitterbugs. The Jewels, who juggle
Indian clubs like mad, and the
Oehmans, who dance, have theii
moments, too.
Movies’ History
Prettily Told
“Hollywood Cavalcade," the story
of how the movies grew up to their
present stature from poverty and
contempt, returned yesterday to the
screen of Loew’s Columbia.
One of the more interesting of the
historical subjects which have fas
cinated the cinema lately, this one
has the added virtues of being told
in handsome technicolor and of be
ing ornamented with many an ex
cerpt from the custard pie and other
comedies which charmed an earlier
generation of moviegoers. It also
has Alice Paye, Don Ameche and
many of Darryl Zanuck’s other tal
ented players, all of them engaged
in the telling of an incidental story
which is not notably dramatic.
J. C.
Strife On the Allegheny
Flares Anew at Keith’s
Tale of Colonial Travail Misses
It’s Promise of Excitement
Despite Frenzy of Gunfire
Tnoae rootin’, tootin, snootin’ sons-o -guns who were tavern society
back In the days when coonskin caps and killing Indians were the fashion,
emerge once more in “Allegheny Uprising,” which opened at Keith’s yes
terday. Their reappearance on the screen is an extremly noisy affair,
centering around Claire Trevor and John Wayne. Unfortunately it is not
much more than a constant tattoo of horses hoofs, counterpolnted with
gunfire by the buckskin brigade.’
Comedy occasionally rears its wel
come face in the form of a frontier
funny man, but not often enough to
save the drama from being a hunk
of horse opera.
For its contribution to the course
in American history which the
movies have been teaching lately,
R-K-O selected the story of the pio
neers of western Pennsylvania whose
life was a constant double-header
with the Indians and the British.
The Indians and British, as every
one knows, were not formally allied
against the hardy farmers but the
effect was precisely the same as if
they had been. Between the fero
city of the former and the inapti
tude of the latter, life for the fron
tiersmen was a constant turmoil.
All the Allegheny people wanted
to do was carve the wilderness into
a land capable of supporting a col
ony of freedom lovers, a place where
they could grow their crops and
drink their rum in peace. The stub
born British could not get it through
their heads that there was no hope
for such a thing so long as craven,
cunning traders were allowed to slip
munitions and instruments of war
to the savages. Naturally, there
fore, the simple, idealistic, peace
loving people simply had to revolt
against that kind of situation under
the leadership of laconic James
8mlth (Wayne) who led one of the
most non-sanguinary revolts in
American history.
* * * *
Neil Swanson’s heroic biography
of the redoubtable Smith, “The First
Rebel," has provided the basis of the
screen narrative directed by William
Setter. The film version places its
stress upon the fact that between
the Indians and the English, the
latter supposed to be friendly but
actually nothing of the kind, the
settlers had time for nothing but
war.
That, of course, makes for action
but there is very little variety in it.
The single exception to the rule of
all battles shall look alike is a single
hand-to-hand encounter between
the settlers and the Indians. In
that one, the whites, with Tarzan
like agility and cleverness, overcome
the superior redskin forces by the
expedient of dropping down upon
them from the trees, an approach
peculiarly designed to upset an In
dian’s poise.
A leaf taken from the book of
John Ford, one of Hollywood’s best
history teachers, helps to enhance
the value of another violent flare of
gunplay. It is the use of fog to con
ceal the approach of the frontier
force to Fort Pitt, a very pretty bit
of photography.
The romance which fights for a
place in the story of “Allegheny Up
rising" becomes one of its comedy
elements whether or not it was in
tended that way, and one suspects it
was not. It is an affair between Miss
Trevor and Wayne. Being a hoy
denish sort of person, with more
than a touch of, the tigress, Miss
Trevor is constantly trying to divert
Wayne from his Indian-English
wars long enough to recognize that
she is mad about him. Wayne can
not be bothered, but the audience
is not so fortunate for Miss Trevor I
seems much more miscast than when
she is being the tough moll of a
gangster, her usual role.
' Comedy on the robust side is pro
vided by a group of frontier fighters,
and drinkers, played by such fellows
as Wilfrid Lawson, Moroni Olson,
Eddie Quillan and John F. Hamil
ton. They are stock characters, but
not quite so stock as the low-life
villain played by (that’s right) Brian
Donlevy.
"Allegheny Uprising,” on the
whole, is better fare for the kiddies
than for the average adult. J. C.
Another From Dumas
Emphasizing his plan to bring to
the screen a number of the great
est stories in literature, Edward
Small will shortly place in produc
tion the Alexandre Dumas classic,
"The Corsican Brothers.” This
story, the central characters of
which are a pair of Siamese twins,
was written by Dumas in 1845 and
has since proved to be one of his
most widely read contributions to
literature.
The production of “The Corsican
Brothers” is the third of Dumas’
books to be brought to the screen
by Edward Small. Th* other two
are “The Count of Monte Cristo”
and “The Man in the Iron Mask,”
both of which have been highly suc
cessful.
Newsreels Cover
War on the Seas
Pictures of the sinking of the
British steamer Mandalay and res
cue of the officers and crew are to
be seen in the Paramount newsreel
at the Earle and Metropolitan Thea
ters starting today.
These are the first actual uncen
sored pictures vividly portraying the
almost dally tragedies of U-boat
sinkings and make an exceptional
wartime story.
Also shown are pictures of the
rescue of the passengers and crew
of the S. S. Yorkshire, as the sea
warfare is intensified.
Paramount newsreel has the ex
clusive story as told on the screen
by Darrell Brady, young American
adventurer.
i -
Mt. Vernon Students
Stage Three Plays
Students of Mount Vernon Semi
nary will stage their first drama
program of this season tomorrow
night, presenting three short plays
at the school’s little theater at 8:30
o’clock. The plays, “The Tenth
Word.” “The Purple Doorknob” and
“Suppressed Desires,” are being di
rected by Miss Edith M. Mack.
Among the students taking part
in this initial program are Mary
McAllister, Nadenia Hutton, Sue
Anderson, Nancy Ryder, Barbara
Baker, Esther Coburn, Margo Spar
go, Sue Sherrill, Betty Porsting,
Mary Pearl Erhard and Ann Laird.
_AMUSEMENTS.
New York Philharmonic
_ . ORCHE8TRA
John Barbirolli. Conductor
November 22, 8:30 con«Huuon
Program: Brahms 8ymphor.r No. 4 Wein
«r*e,r' 'under the Spreading Chestnut
Tree ; Works by Elgar and Berlioz.
Only concert in Washington this season.
Tickets from 75c to *2.50 now on sale at
Symphony Box Office In Homer I. Kitt
8tore. 1330 G Street. National 7332. C. C.
Cappel. Manager.
*
LAST 2 DAYS
CLOSES SAT., NOV. 18th!
WORLDS Vl< GREATEST
MUSICAL \\^ REVUE ON ICE
Adm, 85c. *1.10, *1.65. *2.20. inel. tax
Special Matinee Saturday, Not. 18th.
65c, 85c. *1.10, (1.65. inel. tax.
Riverside Stadium
26th & D N.W. KihgSSo
_AMUSEMENTS._
Tonight at 8:30
Nut Mat. Tomor. at 3::t0
l™£t BARRYMORE
kTARM 6f THREE ECHOES"
uttn i
DEAN JAGGER McKAY MORRIS
85e—12.15. Mat.,, 85c—>3.30
BEG. NEXT MON. EVE.
t Wad. * Sat
The Playwrights’ Company preaenta
’kmisM -
Errs. SI.10 te *2.75. Mata. 55e ta *3.30
rh
TRANS-LUX^:;
U-BOAT SINKINGS; WEST *
GERMAN FRONTS; ANNAPOLIS;
, D. DUCK; FOOTBALL
A* GAMES.
SflfCTfD SHORT SUBJECTS
THEATER PARKING
6 P.M. TO
12 P.M.
CAPITAL GARAGE AS
• DICKEN'S ROOM
f "QUARTER HOUR"
Cocktails OCM
5 to 6 P.M...
* BURLINGTON HOTEL
Vermont Are. at Tbomaa Cireia
4 DINING —DANCING M
//ig ENTERTAINMENT i|
SHOREHflmi
^ CALmT ^
t SPECIAL—
I FOR HOGATE’S
IWe gerve only the freshest
and choicest of the dally
catch . . . Then, there's the
added HOGATE touch that
makes the difference between
Sea Food and Horate's Sea
Food. Try us today!
Luncheons from 50c
Dinners from 85c
Wines, Beverages
Mixed Drinks
SEA 9 FOOD
Unrestricted Perking
9th b Maine Ave. S.W.
Phone RE. .3013
lor Party Reservations
4
a
DANCING.
FOXTROT WALTZ
TO DAhTfcL
<JACK ROLLINS^>
\xSTUDIOS/^
TANGO RHUMBA
PHIL HAYDEN
| For Proper
| DANCE
i INSTRUCTION
Deicriptive Catalogue Upon
j Requett
6 Dupont Circle
DUpont 3431
AMUSEMENTS.AMUSEMENTS.
"Efcabethi EsseT Ca Aba Ba $m Tadg it Anbassad*
nowi
fER “
wm Motor
VmJMt
alt to over
ncellence!"
B. BtR, Pat
r best.”
Camody, Star
nding Thea
he decade.”
.Hum.
I
:
COMIMG THURSDAY TlMWfcsgiving Day PAUL MUNI i 'llE ARE NOT ALONE”
‘ FRANK CAPRA'S1 y\
“MR. SMITH GOES TO I
WASHINGTON”
; A Columbia Picture Co-Starring
Jean Janies ||
; ■=»■■■*-» ARTHUR
) _
A i V ■ s m. ^ A J ^ ■ v A ■ ^ ^B
! *•••• - -... ■- * ’....... • >
- COMING THURSDAY- JAMES CA6NEY A PRISCItli UNE ■ “ROARING IWENTtt*
l fa
nuu 11 X o. Ain L OEilTifill A |
^ | L»] ^
TODAY-This Way to the
Big Fun and Music Show!
MARX
BROTHERS
the anus
iKiirJiipP
■■■■RIM Comedy by Gene Ford
and George Beatty
with
GEORGE BEATTY
SENOR DON ZELAYA
ftlta t El DEHMAN*Katkrya
MAYFIELD* Fhra Janitor Jaarals
20 Rhythm Rockett •
Extra .... MORGAN BAER 1
! at guilt t induct or
■pn mammmmmm
pnM if v ■ 1 ■ 1
V 1 1 t n 1
H0«
ALICE FAYE • OCR AMECME
•HOLLYWOOD CAVALCADE’
> l
ACADEMY °f perlrb WsT*91”
E. Lawrence Phillips' Theatre Beautiful
Continuous From 5:30 P.M.
GINGER ROGERS and DAVID NIVEN In
“BACHELOR MOTHER.”
Also
MARY CARLISLE and BETTY GRABLE in
“Sweetheart of Sigma Chi.”
ATT AG 3331 O SI. N.E. AtL 8300
AILAJ Matinee at 1 P.M.
Double Feature Program.
ANN SHERIDAN. “DEAD END ’ KIDS in
“ANGELS WASH THEIR FACES.” Also
on the Same Program. LEE TRACY in
“SPELLBINDER,”_
CAROLINA mh * N «■AT& 8 *
"NEWS IS MADE AT NIGHT" and "EXILE
EXPRESS."
non P Penna. Are. at 21st St.
UAvLL Home of MlrTonhonic Sound
JACKIE COOPER. BETTY FIELD. "WHAT
A LIFE." News. Cartoon.
CONGRESS 8931 m'h0" A,e 8E
“THE STAR MAKER." with BING CROSBY.
NED SPARKS.
DUMBARTON 1343 WteCBn,,n ATft
"THE WOMEN" with NORMA SHEARER
and JOAN CRAWFORD." News. Time ol
shows. 6:30 and 6:50: doors open 6
_p.m._____
FAIRLAWN ANACOSTIA- D c
"HIDDEN POWER." with JACK HOLT
and DICKIE MOORE._Shorts. _
rDPCMDCI T Fm Parkins. Adults. 25<
UKCXnDLLI Air. Cond. Shows, 7 A f*
ANN SHERIDAN and R. CARLSON in
"WINTER CARNIVAL.'’
i inn 32,7 m s*- n.w.
“Sk^vr Double Feature.
"ROSE MARIE" and "6.(100 ENEMIES."
with WALTER PIDOEON.__
IITTI V 608 9th St. N.W.
LI 1 1IX Bet. F and G.
LESLIE HOWARD
in “PYGMALION.”
I YD IP GAITHERSBURG. MJ.
“IIUL Double Feature
0*0. O BRIEN In “FIGHTING GRINOO.”
ROBT. YOUNO in “MIRACLES FOR
SALE.”_
PRINCESS 1119 Ma*inee’^ P.M*" 8600
VIRGINIA BRUCE and WALTER PIDOEON
In "STRONGER THAN DESIRE " Also
on the Same Prosrram. FAY WRAY in
"NAVY SECRETS."
QTANTON 6th and C Sts. N.E.
OlAlllUIl Finest Sound Equipment
_Continuous From 5:30 P.M.
WALLACE BEERY and JACKIE COOPER In
“THE CHAMP.”
“Wanted by Scotland Yard,”
With JAMES STEPHEN80N. BETTY
LYNNE. LESLIE PERRIN8.
3
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Theatre Having Mailneca.
AMBASSADOR kT
_ Mat. 1 P.M.
BETTE DAVIS. ERROL FLYNN in
THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZA
BETH AND ESSEX.” At 1:10, 3:15
5:20 7:25. 9:35. Ncwsreei.
RFVFR! v 15tl> * e n.e.
» !■ M L1 3300. Mat. 1 P.M.
Parking Sokee Available to Patrons.
RICHARD GREENE RICHARD DIX
in "HERE I AM A STRANGER.” Af
1:45. 3:40. 5:35, 7:35, 9:35.
PAI VFRT 2324 WUeontin Ave.
WO. 2345. Mat. 1 P.M.
Parking Snaee Available to Patrona
ZORINA in “ON YOUR TOES.” At
1:25. 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:35.
CENTRAL 428 MEtth*l4i.N W
Opens 10 A.M.
GINGER ROGERS In “FIFTH AVE
NUE GIRL." At 10. 12:50. 3:45.
6:40. 9:35. WILLIAM BOYD in
"LAW OF THE PAMPAS.” At 11:40.
2:30. 5:25, 8:20. Also Short Subject.
YFNNFTW Kenned*. Near 4th N.W.
HE.nnE.UI BA. 6600. Mat. 1 P.M.
Parking Snaee Available to Patrons.
ZORINA in ON YOUR TOES." At
1125. 3:30. 5:30. 7:30. 9:35._
PFNN 650 Pa. Avenne S.E.
rc.nn li. 2179. Mat. 1 p.m.
LEW AYRES. SLIM SUMMERVILLE
in “ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN
FRONT” At 1, 3:10. 5:20, 7:30,
9:35. Also Short Subjects.
CUrDIHAAI Ga Ave. A Sheridan
OnE.HlUAn BA. 2400. Mat. 1 P.M.
FRED MacMURRAY MADELEINE
CARROLL in "HONEYMOON IN
BALI ' At 1. 3:10. 5:20. 7:30. 9:40.
Also March of Time.
CII VCD Ga. Ave. A Colesvtlle Pike
•MLVE.H SHep. 5500. Mat. 1 P.M.
Parking Space Available to Patrons.
GINGER ROGERS in FIFTH AVE
NUE GIRL.” At 1:50, 3:45, 6 40.
7:40. 9:35, Short Subject.
TTVni I 141)1 St. A Park Sd. N.W.
11VULI Col 1800 Mat 1 P.M
LEW AYRES. SLIM SUMMERVILLE
In "ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN
FRONT.” At 1:05. 3:15. 5:20. 7:30.
9:40. Also Newsreel.
UPTOWN Conn Ave. A Newark.
UrlUWn Wo. 5400. Hat. 1 P.M.
Parking Snaee Available to Patrons.
FRED MacMURRAY. MADELEINE
CARROLL In "HONEYMOON IN
BALI." At 1:05. 3:10. 5:20. 7:25.
9:35. March of Time.
Aucucti nsTim die, rcuvnnaovci
APOLLO 624liH lam*
LANA TURNER in ‘DANCING CO- *
ED.” At 0:15 8, 9:50. Short.
AVALON 8612
LANA TURNER In “DANCING CO
ED.” At 0. 7:45. 9:35. Short._
AVE. GRAND 648 Ef ^fe8*
WALLACE BEERY. CHESTER MOR
RIS in "THUNDER AFLOAT." At 6.
7:50. 9:40, Short Subject.
COLONY 4938 ge.saoo.mw‘
BORIS KARLOFF In "MAN THEY
COULD NOT HANG." At 6:40. 8:15.
8:50. Also Short Subject.
HOME 123aVC8SiV,*‘
JUDY GARLAND. FRANK MORGAN
in “WIZARD OF OZ." At 6. 8, P:50.
SAVOY 3030c&tb4&""
TEX RITTER In "DOWN WYOMING
TRAIL." At 6:50, 8:25 10:05.
CCOft 8244 Ga Aw., Silver Sprint,
utvv Md. Shen. 2510. Park. Space
OLIVER HARDY. HARRY LANODON
in "ZENOBIA." At 5:45. 8:30. BORI8
KARLOFF in "MYSTERY OP MR.
WONG." At 7:16. 10:05.
TA1TAMA 4th and Bntternat Sta
lAMJIVLA Ga 4S12. Parklnt Space
JOEL McCREA. BRENDA MARSHALL
in “ESPIONAGE AGENT." At 6:15,
8, 8:50. Alio Short Subject.
YORK Ga Ave. A Qnebcc PL N.W.
BASIL RATHBONE in "ADVENTURES
OF SHERLOCK HOLMES.” At 6:15.
8. 9:50. Short.
NEWTON “s^sSr
‘FIFTH AVENUE GIRL,*
GINGER ROGERS. JAMES ELLISON.
Matinee at 1 P M.
JESSE THEATER lwJ»a*N,Sta*
Double Feature.
“The Witness Vanishes,**
EDMUND LOWE. WENDIK BARRIE.
“MUTINY ON THE
BLACKHAWK,”
RICHARD ARLEN. ANDY DEVINE.
SYLVAN l- «■
“IN NAME ONLY,”
CAROLE LOMBARD. CARY GRANT. .
PALM THEATER OK\rT \
Double Feature.
“DANCING CO-ED,”
LANA TURNER. RICHARD CARLSON
“WAY DOWN SOUTH,”'.
BOBBY BREEN. SALLY BLANE.
BETHESDA 7,%JB3rftd*m
WI. 2650 or Brad. 336. Free Parking
_ Cont. 6-11.
MICKEY ROONEY. "HUCKLEBERRY
FINN."
TOMOR.—BIO TIME VAUDEVILLE
ON STAGE. At 3:30. 6:40. 9:30
JORDAN and GRACE. Comedy Jug
gler!. BERNIK and WALKER with
LOUISE SLATE, Broadway's Favorite
Comedians, and the VERSATILE RE
VUE, 5 Dancing Stars. Plus Bit
Ena Double Feature. ROY ROGERS lr
Era "ARIZONA KID." CHAS. RUGGLES
Si* In "NIGHT WORK.”
3 hippodrome; Doub e Feature.
TYRONE POWER. "JE8SE JAMES"
>4 WAYNE MORRIS In "MEN ARE
r.l SUCH FOOLS."___
n A Men Mt. Rainier. Md.
LAMtU GR. 2346
At 6:40, 9:10.
SPENCER TRACY. "STANLEY ANT
LIVINGSTONE." _
anna ran HYATT8VILLE. MD.
*4- AKIAUL Hyatts 285
© At 6:05. 7:40. 9:30._
GINGER ROGERS. "FIFTH AVKNU1
s GIRL."__
© MU A ROCKVILLE, MD
•fl miLU Roekv. 191
T5 _ At 7:10. 9:25.
Jr BETTE DAVIS, "THE OLD MAID ’
.h MARLBORO v™r£Zn7? 'u
A Continuous. 7-11.
“ ON OUR STAGE:
POLLY JENKINS AND
HER PLOWBOYS.
Featured In Gene Autry pictures, am
formerly with National Barn Dance li
Chicago. Act features 20 musical In
struments.
At 7:15. 9:25.
On Screen. BOB BURNS In
“Our Leading Citizen.”
ARLINGTON. VA. rh oTn“»
WILSON JSA
FRED MacMURRAY and MADELEINE CAR
ROLL in "HONEYMOON IN BALI.”
ACUTON 3166 Wllaon Bird.
Aon I UN Phone Oi. 1139
BOB BAKER In "DESPERATE TRAILS.’
BUCKINGHAM “ttJE&TSi*0'
BINO CROSBY in "THE STAR MAKER.’
FALLS CHURCR VA. ,.*»*
STATE N&SES£G LEI
ANNA NEAOLE in I “STRAIGHT
“NURSE EDITH I SHOOTERS" and
CAVELL." "MR. WONO LN
I CHINATOWN."
ALEXANDRIA. VA.
REED BE fiETO.
JAMES STEWART and JEAN ARTHUR li
^MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON.'
RICHMOND Pho«Ir*Alex.n sis.
"PRIDE OP THE BLUE GRASS."
HISEK-dcTHESDA
“Betheada’a Neweat and Moat Beautiful
’ BARBARA^aWycK1 ADOLPH M$HJOtJ
“GOLDEN BOY,”
With Wn. Holden. At 6:50 and #:J0 p.m,
f i

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