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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 11, 1940, Image 8

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,-Steinway Pianos—i
AO NEW STEINWAY PIANOS contain two apodal features,
both patented by Staiaway k Son* aad not available in any
othtr piaao. Staiaway Toaa aad Responsiveness ia aapranaa 1
THE ACCELERATED ACTION
THE DIAPHRAGMATIC SOUNDING BOARD
Theta Exclusive Features Are Incorporated |a Both
Grands and
Steinway Vertical Models
(See Illustrations Above)
NEW PRICED
STEINWAY AS LOW
PIANOS wa AS
1 AQ/ of Price of Any New Stainway Piano will bo
X U /0 accepted as an initial payment.
The Balance may he extended over a period of several
years. Used Pianos taken in trade at fair values.
A Memorial Gift
To Your CHURCH AT EASTER
With its truly wonderful and almost Infinite variety of tone
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Equipped With Reverberation Control
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oae map be gradu
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• Pits ia space 4x4
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OP MUSICAL EN*
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DROOP’S • 1300 G
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LINCOLN’S INVENTION—United States Commissioner of Patents Conway P. Coe (left) Is shown
yesterday explaining the operation of a model of a device patented by Abraham Lincoln, to M. L.
Wilson, director of the Extension Service, Department of Agriculture, who is president of the Lin
coln Group here. > —Star Staff Photo.
Lincoln's Parents
Were Not Poor,
Cleric Thinks
Bt the Auocieted Preu.
CHESTER, N. J„ Feb. 10.—Popu
lar fancy likes to depict Abe Lin
coln as the offspring of poverty
stricken parents.
The Rev. George T. Lemmon, pas
tor of the Chester Federated Church
and owner of one of the world's
largest collection of Lincolniana,
prefers to think he wasn’t.
To back up his belief, the clergy
man-hobbyist produced today docu
ments found after a year's search
which purported to show that the
Civil War President's father, Thom
as Lincoln, paid $96 60 for his wed
ding outfit and still had $125 left in
a drawing account.
“The fact that Thomas Lincoln
was dolled up for the occasion in
dicates that his wife-to-be was
dressed accordingly, and therefore,
she was no pauper either,” the Rev.
Mr. Lemmon asserted.
He expressed opinion that the
young Lincoln was “a fair sample of
the pioneers.” who had to endure
more than the average number of
hardships and fight for everything
he achieved.
“But the belief that his parents
were poverty-stricken is . untrue,”
the clergyman asserted.
“In those days no poor man could
afford such expensive clothing, not
even'for his wedding.”
He said he located copies of an
account book of a store in Hodgen
vllle, Ky„ where the elder Lincoln
was buying agent* showing that he
$ald $88 for "the cloth and -Trim
mings” and $8.60 for hit wedding
hat.
Facsimiles of those entries and
another showing that Thomas Lin
coln had $125 left in the drawing
account after acquiring his trous
seau are in the possession of Judge
Otis H. Mather, Hodgenvllle banker,
the Rev. Mr. Lemmon said.
The Lemmon collection, which has
been bequeathed to Drew University
at Madison, N. J„ includes 800 books
and more than 10,000 mounted and
5.000 unmounted items of Lincoln
likenesses, speeches, plays, menus,
dedication and unveiling programs,
jokes, editorial and oratorical ref
erences to the President.
The owner has extended his in
terest in Lincolnlana to determin
ing the extent to which Mr. Lin
coln’s name is commercialized
through such media as trade-marks,
corporate names, hotel and insur
ance advertising and radio pro
grams.
To Aid Foreign Students
Universities and colleges of Japan
will sponsor a young men’s cultural
association which will extend neces
sary help to foreign students study
ing there.
Lincoln's 'Boat-Lifting' Device
Is Shown at Patent Office
Expansible Air Chambers Were Supposed
To Help Craft Over Shoals
Patent No. 6489 Is just another de
vice registered by the United States
Patent Office. Like thousands of
others, the contraption never
amounted to anything. The inventor
sought to lift, so to speak, a boat
by its own bootstraps.
Probably the only earthly good the
invention has served Is to Illus
trate another little known but warm
ly human side of Abraham Lincoln,
who, like millions of others, dreamed
futilely of making a fortune on a
patent.
The model that the then Repre
sentative from 'Illinois filed with the
Patent Office In 1849 was taken from
its glass showcase yesterday while
United States Patent Commissioner
| Conway P. Coe explained its opera
i tion to M. L. Wilson, president of the
Lincoln group here.
Queer-Looking Device.
The model is r. miniature wooden
boat about a feet long. Lincoln's
j queer-looking device on the sides
was supposed to provide additional
buoyancy for a boat in shallow water,
thus permitting the vessel to navi
gate safely over«dangerous shoals.
Die device consisted of two ex
pansible chambers running length
wise on either side of the boat.
Lincoln thought the chambers could
be pumped full of air when shallow
watgr was reached, forcing the cham
bers down into the water and lifting
the vessel up.
wnetner tne contraption ever was
actually fitted to a boat, or whether
it would work if so fitted, is not
known, but Lincoln managed to get
a patent any way. Mr. Wilson be
lieves Lincoln himself might have
whittled out the model, since he
was quite proficient in handling a
Jackknife. The model, in an excel
lent state of preservation, is well
constructed, but not highly fin
ished.
In Own Handwriting.
Lincoln's original application for
the patent, in his own handwrit
ing, is one of the highly-prised pos
sessions of the Patent Office, which
on April 10 celebrates the 150th
anniversary of President Oeorge
gashlngton's signing of the first
tent act. Mr. Wilson's visit with
Mr. Coe, of course, was prompted
by Lincoln's 131st birthday anni
versary. which is tomorrow.
Historians generally agree that
Lincoln first saw the need for some
kind of a device that would enable
a boat to navigate in shallow water
while engaged as a hand on fiat
I boats, which were a vital part of
the transportation system before the
full development of railroads.
Mr. Wilson, an ardent collector
of Lincoln!*, recalled this saying at- !
tributed to the then 40-year-old
would-be inventor:
“With this invention I could float
a flat boat in a heavy dew."
Dynamite Caps in Coal
NEWARK. N. J„ Feb. 10 </P).—Mrs.
Mary Murphy noted a can in coal
she was about to shovel into the
furnace. An inspection revealed the
van contained 25 dynamite caps.
Police said the caps probably had
been Intended for coal mine blast
ing and had been dropped into the
coal accidentally..
15 Red Cross Workers
Dispatched to Georgia
Fifteen Red Cross disaster workers
today were at work In Albany, Oa.,
to*help succor mors than 250 persons
caught In a tornado which struck
the town early yesterday.
They were dispatched from vari
ous points yesterday upon receipt
of telephone reports of the storm.
Dr. William De Klelne, medical
director of the Red Cross, and mi—
Helen Dunn, Red Cross Nursing
Service assistant director, and three
other workers departed from Wash
ington by train and automobile. Six
nurses were sent from Macon, Oa,
and five other members of the Red
Cross who were In Georgia and Ala
buna were instructed to go to the
scene.
Three workers from Washington
were Miss Charlotte Johnson and
Preston Betts.
Blankets, cots and first aid were
being rushed yesterday from Port
Bennlng, Ga., Army post.
Dewitt C. Smith, who dispatched
the party, said yesterday he had In
structed John Phillips of the Albany
Red Cross Chapter to meet all emer
gency needs.
Wrong Number Again
RENO, Nev., Feb. 10 (Jf).—A Reno
citizen picked up his telephone,
dialed 3131. Hie fire department
quickly responded. Shortly after
ward the station received another
call. “Sorry,” an apologetic voice
said, "I meant to call a taxicab.”
CAMERAS
PROJECTORS
EVERYTHING
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SOMMER'S CAMERA EXCH.
141* X. T. At*. X.W. Op** It**. Till B
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NO DOWN PAYMENT
ONLY $1.25 WEEKLY
on Your Electric Bill
First Postmaster Since Lincoln
To Be Installed at New Salem
Br the Associated Press.
LINCOLN’S NEW SALEM, 111.,
Feb. 10.—A modern airliner and
an old-fashioned stage coach will
"carry the mail” again to New Salem
Monday, celebrating the first postal
service here since Postmaster Abra
ham Lincoln lost his job a century
ago.
The little log post office, where
Lincoln held his first Government
job, will be reopened on the 131st
anniversary of the Civil War Presi
dent’s birth with more ceremony
than this reconstructed village ever
saw.
For three years—from 1833 to
1836—young Lincoln handled the
mail at a little hardwood desk in
the Hlll-McNamar store. Here he
studied lav from borrowed books
and campaigned for the State Leg
islature while delivering letters,
stuffed in his hat, to neighbors.
Postmaster General James A.
Farley will lead the ceremonies
Monday when a fourth-class post
office is opened in the rebuilt log
structure. Gov. Horner and Il
linois’ two Senators, Scott W. Lucas
and James M. Slattery, will partici
pate in the program to be broad
cast from 1:30 to 2 p.m.
The first incoming mail will ar
rive after an eight-hour stagecoach
trip from Springfield. An hour later
a modem mail plane will make
the trip in 10 minutes and drop
another bag of mail.
The new postmaster—the first
since Lincoln lost his job when the
post office was moved to nearby
Petersburg on May 30,1836—is John
W. Gellerman, a Menard County
fanner.
Gellerman, who will be paid ac
cording to postal receipts expected
from the thousands of tourists who
visit New Salem State Park yegrly,
hopes he will make more than the
$25 to 830 a year that Lincoln is
reputed to have received.
The new post office’s cancella
tion stamp will bear the words,
"Lincoln's New Salem” to avoid con*
fusion with a modern New Salem
in Pike County, which sprang up
after the old village tumbled into
decay. The rest of the villagers
moved out one by one not long
after Lincoln left in 1837 to seek
his fortune in Springfield.
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