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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 15, 1940, Image 19

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1940-03-15/ed-1/seq-19/

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FORDSA
ENGINE HEADS K
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Antiques and valuable pieces of
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provided. Be sure to get complete
coverage.
“See the United States First"
Allies Reported Ready
To Finance New U.l
Explosives Plants
Already Contemplate
Purchases in Excess
Of $100,000,000 »
By the Associated Press.
Heavy allied orders for explosives
appeared likely today to produce an
expansion of American powder
manufacturing facilities comparable
to that now taking place In the
aircraft industry.
Great Britain and France, al
ready contemplating purchases in
excess of $100,000,000, were repre
sented by munitions authorities as
ready to finance new factories as
they did in 1914-17, before the
United States entered the World
War.
The first evidence of this was the
disclosure yesterday of a $1,427,000
Franco-British advance to the Atlas
Powder Co. of Wilmington, Del., to
increase facilities for manufacture
of TNT, the explosive used in artil
lery shells.
The concern was said to have con
tracted already for doubling the
capacity of its plants in Missouri.
Larger Deals Delayed.
Uncertainties over the course of
the European conflict and taxation
difficulties with the Treasury have
delayed much larger deals, it was
said.
Negotiations have been in pro
gress for months for a $25,000,000
powder plant financed by France to
turn out an initial $25,000,000 order.
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of imported
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GREY IMPORTED TWEEDS
GREEN IMPORTED TWEEDS
BROWN IMPORTED TWEEDS
There's something obout on imported English Tweed thot
distinguishes a suit of clothes—the rugged weave, the
bright patterns—the built-in weor. You'll like these new
2-pants suits. New, approved 1940 business and sports
models. All sizes.
HERZOG'S • THE STORE FOR MEN- ^
MALLORY HATS
1
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Mallery Velshire finish (looks and feels soft as finest
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natural edge provide the all-important Spring look.
Hi* Distinctive faster Gift!
A Mallory Easter Gift Certifi
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initials, in a gay littla
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MANHATTAN SHIRTS • ARROW SHIRTS • MALLORY HATS
INTERWOVEN HOSE • CLERMONT CLOTHES • NUNN-BUSH SHOES
i • ,
Other negotiations, with a third
Arm, for a similar amount have
hung fire for weeks.
Manufacture of powder on this
side of the Atlantic offers an ad
vantage in that its weight for ship
ment is only about a twelfth of its
component raw materials. There is
a somewhat similar advantage in
transporting completed shells or
high explosives such as TNT, am
monium nitrate and picric.
Arms experts estimated that
British-French reserves were more
than ample for the current "seige”
stage of the war, but might be
drained rapidly in major offensives
requiring expenditure of ammuni
tion at a World War consumption
rate.
Output Has Dwindled.
In two decades of peace, American
munitions output has dwindled to a
small fraction of the World War
peak, when the United States was
turning out as much powder and
shells as the British and French
combined and supplied much of
their needs. Both War and Navy
Departments are anxious for some
expansion of existing facilities as a
national defense precaution.
At present only two Government
and two private plants are equipped
for powder production on a sizable
scale Factories for the manufacture
of high explosives are not much
more numerous. Should the coun
try enter any war. War Department
plans call for immediate construc
tion of many munitions plants to
remedy these deficiencies.
Congress has voted initial funds
toward purchase of special muni
tions to cost $33,500,000, without
which Maj. Gen. Charles M. Wesson,
chief of Army Ordnance, testified
the United States would be crippled
in an emergency. '
Injuries to pedestrians last year
in the District from March, when
pedestrian control regulations were
placed into effect, to December,
showed a decrease of 11$ from the
total pedestrian injuries during a
similar period in 193$.
Capitol'Attache'—Wanderer With a Cause
Pete Henderson, Whose First Job on Hill Was Raking Leaves,
Has Come Long Way by Circuitous Jumps
By PRESTON GROVER.
It’s a long leap from the banks
of the River Clyde in Scotland to
the swivel chair of the congressional
gymnasium office, especially if a fel
low makes most of the Important
ports of call along the way.
But Pete Henderson made it—
after a fashion.
Not that Pete isn’t a vast success.
He is. But he doesn’t like swivel
chairs. They always tip him back
too far. Then Pete’s got a pretty
bad disease for a Swivel chair
worker.
“The wanderin’ foot, you might
call it,” says Pete, eyeing a vivid
print of the Queen Mary on the wall.
She was built near his home town.
'Raked Leaves at CapiteL
Nobody knows the title of Pete’s
Job. The high-falutin’ way would
be to call him the physical attache
to members of Congress. A plain
everyday title would be "gym at
tendant.” He’s really neither—and
both. He simply attends to Con
gressmen’s locker room wants, helps
them exercise and keeps them from
overdoing it.
Back in 1921 it meant not a tink
er's dam to Pete Henderson when
Representative Jim Mead from Buf
falo got up and addressed Congress
for one minute on health. But out
of that speech, through slow and
painful processes, grew the present
gymnasium in the basement of the
new House Office Building.
Pete didn’t show up in Washing
ton until 1933, a victim of the de
pression. Pete's California Repre
sentative got him a 10-day job rak
ing Capitol leaves. Then the main
tenance department sicked him on
the plumbing.
Invents a Game.
By that time the gym had sim
mered down to a five-man gang of
volley ball players. One of them
PETE HENDERSON.
spied Pete and made him equipment1
keeper-upper. Soon he was playing
volley ball with them; his reputa
tion was made for life when he In
vented the congressional game of
"paddle ball.” It’s the easy way to
play handball on Capitol Hill.
In ’35 the new House Office Build
ing was going up, so the gym gang
and the Capitol physician, Dr.
George Calver, joined forces and
wangled a part of the basement for
a physiotherapy room. Aided and
abetted by Pete, Representative
Mead and his daily dozeners worked
up dues to buy equipment.
Now they’ve got 110 active mem
berg, each of whom subscribes to Dr.
Calver’s health rule No. 3, tacked
on the gym wall:
Drink plentifully (of water).”
Easy Tempered, Bat—
Thirty-nine, blue-eyed, tall and a
bit slooped, Pete’s had more ups and
downs than a circus acrobat. Born
in Scotland, he took to the sea—an
adventure that gave him his wan
derin’ foot. But he really wanted
to come to America, so he learned
the automobile trade and worked in
Paterson, N. J.; Buffalo. Detroit,
Cleveland, Chicago and Santa Fe,
N. Mex. When the World War
broke out he joined the American
Army and fought in Prance.
Pete’s the most easy-tempered
kind of fellow you’ll ever meet. Only
one thing burns him up—people who
think members of Congress are liv
ing the life of Roman bathers when
they try to take care of their health.
A magazine printed a picture of
a member of Congress in one of
Pete’s bathtubs and captioned it
"Asleep in the Deep.” That was
just too much.
"These men pay for all their own
equipment. Every last piece of it is
their personal property. Some of it
is second hand because we can’t af
ford first-class stuff. These aren't
Roman baths, they’re places where a
member can relax right and keep
himself fit. Of all the deaths tills
year, not a member of the gymna
sium has passed away. Why—”
End to Itching.
Pete would go on forever defend
ing his charges if you’d let him.
All you have to do, really, to prove
what he’s saying is sneak down to
the gym any day. You’d be sur
prised how many members of Con
gress take their health seriously and
obey Dr. Calver’s rule No. 3 about
drinking water.
Pete took his first vacation last
year. He and his wife went to
Nye Hits Dependence
On Foreign Trade
And War Traffic
Flow of Human Blood
Must Not Bo Linked to
U 5. in Any Y/ay, He Soys
Br the Asaoeutcd Preu.
NEW YORK. March 15.—Sepator
Gerald P. Nye, Republican, of North
Dakota, declared last night that
“experience tells us that we ought
to discourage war trade as we would
discourage those grounds which
breed disease.”
In an address prepared for the
15th annual banquet of the drug,
chemical and allied trades section
of the New York Board of Trade,
he said the “record of fact” estab
lished as “cause No. 1 for our entry
into Europe’s (World) War our
American appetite for the profit
that was available from other peo
ple’s wars.”
“This is a sad day indeed if we
make ourselves in any degree de
pendent upon and rejoicing over the
availability of the kind of foreign
trade that is dependent upon a flow
of human blood in Europe's eternal
disease called war,” Senator Nye
went on.
"It is a sad day, too. if this kind
of foreign trade is counted essen
tial to our American economy and is
counted the only way in which we
can hope to be prosperous. • • •
“It follows that we should develop
an American economy that Is in no
degree dependent upon war trade.
• * * "I do not argue for abandon
ment of foreign trade. I urge only
Scotland to visit his old home. They
had a thrilling ride on a “marked”
vessel through the war zone.
“ Twas good lor my wanderin’
toot," says Pete. "It don’t itch any
more."
abandonment of dependence upon
foreign trade.”
Speaking of reciprocal traded
agreements, Senator Nye said the
farmer was "of necessity the goat
* * * because after all, those other
nations with whom we trade have
for the most part only agricultural
products. Thus is the American
farmer afforded a foreign compe
tition that denies him, in effeet, hie
own American market.”
Virginia Lamb Crop
Will Be Smaller
By thaAuoclated Pres*.
RICHMOND, Va., March 15.—
Prospects for the early spring lamh
crop in Virginia are not as favor
able as last year, Henry M. Taylor,
Federal-State agricultural statisti
cian, reported.
He said that the number of lambs
to be marketed this season would be
somewhat smaller and shipments
later than a year ago.
"On March 1,” he reported, “57
per cent of the ewes had lambed
compared with 53 per cent a year
ago, but the number of lambs living
per 100 ewes was only 118 compared
with 124 last year.”
Death- losses were high among
ewes which lambed during the ex
treme cold weather in January.
TRAVEL.
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Radical New Program of Large-Volume Production
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1940 Kelvinators at Lowest Prices in History!
DON'T GUESS ibout refrigerator
values this year. Go to your Kelvin
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at the Name! Look at the Price!
You save $30 to $60, compared with
last year’s prices, on big, new 1940
Kelvmators.
Look At the Size! Big 6 and 8 cubic
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Look At the Name! It’s Kelvinator—
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Look At the Price! The lowest in Kel
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Imagine it—these are not out-of-date,
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Here’s why Kelvinator can offer you
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FIRST, we found a more efficient way to
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THIRD, because of greatly increased
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Come down and see these beauties.
They’re gleaming white, welded-steel
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Your Kelvinator dealer invites you to
come in today and see 1940’s outstand
ing refrigerator values.
KELVINATOR DIVISION
Nash-Kelvinator Corp., Detroit, Mich;
«T0 HELP YOU PICK the best re
frigencor for your money, your
Kelvinator dealer will gladly give
you a free copy of "The 1940 Re
frigerator Guide.” It contains com
plete, authoritative information re
garding 1940 refrigerator values;
SAVE *30 TO *60 ON BIG 1940 SIX CUBIC FOOT KELVINATORS
WANT GBIATBt BIAIITTT Model
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^BIG 6'A CU. FT^
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