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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 09, 1940, Image 13

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Garson Kanin an Outpost
Of Freedom of Speech
In a Town Where It Doesn’t Thrive
He Speaks Freely About Anything;
From Pictures to the Weather
By JAY CARMODY.
HOLLYWOOD.
Among the things which do not thrive in this lush tropic clime is
freedom of speech. The right to-call a spade a spade, or a heel a heel,
to keep the thing neuter and masculine only, is limited by scores of forces
to which nine-tenths of the cinema population are susceptible. True
beyond the shadow of a doubt, Joe Jones may be a low-grade whelp, but
no one may say so louder than a whisper on the theory that Joe tomor
row may have the role you have*———--————
been wanting. Or, he may be the
pal of a cameraman who could make
Ann Sheridan _
look like Edna
May Oliver if
Joe only gave
the word. The
capacity of am
bition to make
cowards is one
of the most ex
asperating phe
nomena the vis
itor encounters.
It works on him
to the point of
becoming per
sonal, until he
longs to hear
himself,- if no J»y Carmody.
one else, told just what a skulking
sk- (see, it's got us, too) he is.
And then one meets Garson
Kanin.
So far as we know Kanin is free
speech in this sun-tanned neck of
the woods. He has opinions about
everything, censorship, critics, the
social menace represented by swim
ming pools, the rights of actors, the
position of stockholders, the evils
of money, the value of alcoholic
stimulants in tropical climates, hay
fever cures, the weaknesses of mo
tion pictures and scores of other
subjects. And not only does he
have opinions about these and other
things, but he is willing to spill
them anvwhere on the theory' that
one of the finest things about this I
country is that it is free. It is a
refreshing and admirable thing to
find some one who will say it is a
nice or rotten day, as the case may
be, without adding that it is off the
record.
Before any one can ask again
THEATER PARKING
6 P.M. TO
12 P.M.
CAPITAL GARAGE
1320 N. Y. Ave., Bet. 13th & 14th
EXCESSIVE
DRINKING
DISEASE
The Greenbill Institute is devoted
exclusively to the treatmer*. and
correction of
Chronic Alcoholism
Write or call tor tree booklet tmc.lea
in plain envelopeI. Private interview
arranged. .Vo obligation.
C\reenhill institute
^3145 16th St. N.W.
TELEPHONE DAT OR NIGHT
COLUMBIA 4754
Strictly Private
Controlled. Operated and Supervised
by Licensed Physicians
LOANS
74 years of buying, selling and
lending on diamonds, jewelry, etc.
Liberal Loans at Lowest Possible Rates.
GASH FOR OLD GOLD
(Government License)
E. HEIDENHEIMER
Ettablithed 1866
LOAN OFFICE 1213 H St. N.W.
. 305 Kin* St
Alexandria, va. Washington.
INSTALLED
IMMEDIATELY

NO DOWN
PAYMENT
BUY NOW
AND SAVE
GUARANTEED
S YEARS
Visit Sherwood’s Showrooms:
1723 Connecticut Ave., N. W.
or Phone Decatur 4181
( Open Evenings Until Nine)
rjnTjTll TTTjTj
HKBB
ARBAUGH'S RESTAURANT. 2606 Conn.
Ave. Only at Arbaugh's can you get real
Bar-b-q spareribs and aged charcoal
broiled steaks. Mixed drinks, wine, beer.
SHAR-ZAD, Carlton Hotel. Dancing to
Oeorge Duffy's Orchestra, featuring Claire
Martin. 5 to 7. 10 to 2. Min., $1.50 after
10 p.m.. Bat.. $2.00. ME. 8886,_
BURLINGTON HOTEL Vermont at Thomas
Circle. 4 squares from White House.
Dickens Room Cocktails 5 to 8 p.m.. 25c.
Dinner, 6 to 8 p.m., 85c. 75c and $1.
MADRILLON RESTAURANT. Washington
Building, 15th and New York Ave. The
favorite place to dine, the popular place
to dance.__
THE NIGHTINGALE. Richmond Hgwr., 314
ml. sooth of Alex..' Dancing, 0:.‘i0 to 1
nightly, including Sun. Sweet swing by Bill
Downer’s Orchestra. Temple 4640.
SAY-ADAMS HOUSE—Overlooking White
ouse at 16th and H Sts. Dining in an
atmosphere of charm, dignity and gen
tility. Luncheon. 85c; dinner from $1.25.
Organ music nightly during dinner
GOLD ROOM at WESLEY HALL. 1703 K
St. Entertain here. Best foods: unique
service; like a most fastidious home.
Luncheon. 75c: dinner. $1.50._;_
THE TROIKA, inn Connecticut Ave.
Dinner or supper, $1.50; Sat.. $2. Danc
ing 7 to 8. Continental Revues twice
nightly and Sundays. No cover. Luncheon,
75c on Bat, only; dancing._
MARYLAND CLUB GARDENS on Marlboro
flke. Featuring Nadine and her co-ed
band. De luxe dinner, $1.25. Dancing
until 2 o'clock. Phone Hillside 0600._
LOUNGE RIVIERA. Hotel 2100 16th St.
Dining, dancing to Pete Macias’ Orchestra,
featuring Adele Van, 10 'til 2. Noraln. or
Tover except Sat, eve., $1.50 min, CO. 7200.
ffrOREHAM BLUE ROOM, Connecticut at
Caivert. Dining and daneing. Two floor
Sts*
i
who is this Kanin, he is the rather
sharp-faced, pint-sized director who
in three years has made three pic
tures which have a marvelous affin
ity for 10-best lists. "A Man to
Remember,” “The Great Man Votes’*
and "Bachelor Mother,” all highly
human documents, are Kanin’s three
contributions to the art of the cine
ma, the enjoyment of the masses
and the satisfaction of a determina
tion to make good entertainment.
Nice work, what?
The "Kanin touch” has not be
come a critical cliche yet, but it is
inevitable. It is a constant thing,
a feeling for life that Kanin could
not keep out of his pictures, and
when critics get around to defining
it they are bound to let their imag
inations soar to the standard de
scriptive platitude.
* * * *
The “Kanin touch” is quite safe
in Kanin’s hands. It is his theory
that any one making entertainment
for the masses should keep in touch
with the masses. It is his further
theory that too many people in the
movies insulate themselves from the
masses with swimming pools, huge
bank accounts, too many serwgnts,
and fences with too few gates. It is
all right to have such things, Kanin
feels. He is going to have them him
self. But he has no intention of
letting them “get” him as he thinks
they do so many cinema geniuses
whose fear of losing the symbols of
success fits them for failure.
"Fine,” you say to Kanin, “granted
you won't change, that, you will keep
your feet on the ground. What about
your friends, the people? They will
see a change in you, whether or no.
You will be a fellow with a swim
ming pool and they will be fellows
without swimming pools. They will
stick to their kind and you will have
to go to yours.”
“No,” says Kanin. “Ill find a
technique for keeping In touch if
I have to.”
You believe him.
He is believable even when he
starts criticizing critics.
"Too many of them want to be
funny,” he says. “Their yearning to
be clever, to write wittily, tricks
them into forgetting Just what their
jobs are. I don’t care how savagely
they say a picture is bad. that’s their
real business, but I hate to have
them imply its failure is the result
of insincerity on our part. That note
creeps into too many reviews. I’ve
been here three years now. I have
sat in on a number of picture making
sessions. Never once have I heard a
producer, writer, director, actor, or
what have you say ‘Let’s make the
worst picture ever made.’ Some re
views are written as if that were the
case.”
Another thing Kanin thinks critics
could do, if they had the idea of
public service instead of personal
approbation, is to perform a highly
valuable censorship function both to
the public and the motion picture
industry.
“If they told their readers to stay
away from a picture that was dirty
or smutty, they would keep away
those who did not want to see such
films. True, they would bring in
those who did prefer such pictures.
They will come anyhow, of course,
but keeping away the decent, clean
minded would make the production
of any save intelligent films im
possible.”
No prude is Kanin with reference
to screen material. He thinks the
screen should be as large as life it
self. in the handling of delicate
material, he insists merely that it
be done with good taste.
"You can’t tell me,” he insists,
"that directors like Gregory La Cava,
Leo McCarey, Frank Capra, John
Ford and a few others need to be
subject to the same quality of cen
sorship as those who make low grade,
low cost pictures. They are men of
good taste and can be trusted to
show it in their work.’
The vehement, outspoken Kanin,
who was graduated from George
Abbott productions, has his definite
opinions on the matter of directors
and their jobs. He still has them
even though R-K-O turned him over
its knee a year ago and gave him a
spanking. Physically, he is a handy
size for that, but only physically.
He feels a director should have
complete freedom in choosing the
material he will work with. He did
not like the material of “Ann of
Windy Poplars,” not because it was
not a good piece of screem drama,
but rather because it was not his
type. Now that it is virtually fin
ished, with another director, he has
nothing but praise for it. He has
not a bit of rancor that he was sus
pended for his refusal to make it.
“Should actors and actresses have
the same right of story selections?"
seemed like a good question at that
point, which was after luncheon
coffee.
“No,” said Kanin. “Directors and
writers know stories. Actors don’t.
They do not look at them the same
way. The sole reservation I make
on the subject is that I would not
insist upon a player doing something
he could not like. He could not do
his best under the circumstances.
If I could not sell him on the merit
of the story, and his general
ignorance of story value, I wouldn’t
have him in a picture. But I’d work
on him before letting him go.”
Mr. Kanin had to go then; some
thing about “They Knew What They
Wanted,” which the screen suddenly
has become liberal enough to make
as Sidney Howard wrote it originally.
It was made once before, but so com
pletely changed from the story of a
triangle involving an old man, his
young wife, and a young man that
they could not even use the title
without blushing.
Now the' real story, honest but
blushless, will be told by Kanin with
Charles Laughton and Carole Lom
bard in the major roles.
Impressive little guy, no matter
what he is talking about, in words
or in celluloid.
Zorina on Stage
Samuel Goldwyn has loaned Zor
ina, who is under long-term contract
to him, to Irving Berlin and Buddy
DeSylva for the starring role in
their forthcoming Broadway musical
comedy, "Louisiana Purchase."
IT S THE LITTLE THINGS THAT COUNT—It is in “Dr. Cyclops,” at any rate, the principal little
things being Janice Logan and Thomas Coley, who seem to feel very small indeed before the
superior intelligence of Albert Dekker. Mr. Dekker is the mad scientist who reduces people to
one-sixth their normal size in the film, which opens Friday at the Capitol.
Letter From Lynn Fontanne
Really Was Not From Her
It Was Attempted Sabotage of Lunts
And ‘There Shall Be No Night/
But It Didn’t Work
By HARRY MacARTHUR.
There is an old and familiar definition of news, but if George
Bernard Shaw, who is both a man and a vegetarian, were caught gnawing
his way through a pack of Russian wolfhounds it would be no news at all
compared to the phenomonen of an actress asking a reviewer for un
favorable comment. So this letter, ostensiDly from Lynn Fontanne, was
something of a shock, a severe shock, in the harsh, glaring light of the
other noon. <•
Please do not review “There Shall
Be No Night” when it comes to
Washington, requested the letter, or,
if this is not possible, please review
it unfavorably. The letter was im
mediately put aside, on the far cor
ner of the desk, in the hope that
if we didn’t look at it it would go
away. Four hours later it had not
gone away. In fact, it still said the
very same thing.
It Intimated there were certain
reasons why the Lunts did not want
to continue in the new Robert E.
Sherwood drama and there almost
was a half-way note of authenticity j
about it. Finally we realized that it !
would have been noised about had
Miss Fontanne suddenly gone ber
serk with the flaming wim-wams
and was sublimating the passion of
the insanity by writing poison pen
letters about herself.
A discreet and incoherent tele
gram asked her, “Is this letter from
you really from you, or is it sabo
tage?' The reply was on hand the
next morning. “You have receivM
no letter from me. Do tell me what
it was all about,” it said. And before
long the Playwright*’ Co. wa*
getting Interested via telephone
from New York. Seems the situa
tion had been as startling tb Alfred
Lunt in Boston as it had been to
us in Washington. Mr. Lunt was,
one might say, excited. But "sabo
tage” was the best word we could
think of to inspire immediate action.
That, of course, is what the whole
thing was. Somewhere, evidently,
there is some one who dislikes Lynn
Fontanne, strange as that might
seem to any citizen of normal im
pulses. But now it is a matter be
tween the Lunts, the Post Office De
partment, the writer of the letter
and his soul. Gradually we are re
covering from the shock, getting
back what we laughingly call our
right mind, and we want to hear no
more about the whole plot.
Just to keep this column on a high
plane we give you now two bulletins
from respected institutions of learn
ing, which have arrived via the
Warner Bros, publicity department.
“The life history of Ann Sheri
dan,” says the first, “will go into the
archives of Southern Methodist Uni
versity’s McCord Museum of the
Theater.” S. M. U., it seems, has
asked Miss Sheridan for “an official
life story, complete with photos, de
picting her childhood, school days
and subsequent rise to stardom.” It
is to serve as “a permanent record
of the unique career of one of North
Texas’ most illustrious film stars.”
Phooey, Harvard, you ungallant
Yankees.
The other bulletin comes from
Princeton. The In and Out Club,
literary society there, it says, "has
The Local Dance Scene
New Number on Week’s Program
By Washington Ballet
Dorothy Radde Emery is the local composer represented this week
on the Washington National Ballet’s third "Fridays at Nine” program
of the season, Friday night at 9 o’clock, of course, at the Wardman Park
Theater. The new dance is “Salem Witches,” with choreography by Lisa
Gardiner, director of the ballet group. With the New England of 1690
as the locale, the composer and choreographer say their treatment of the
work is something entirely new in*-——
the field of dance drama. The en
tire ballet company will take part
in "Salem Witches,” with Alice
Louise Hunter and Fillis Cole danc
ing leading roles.
The program also will include a
group of character dances—among
them Russian, Italian, Hungarian
and other national and folk dances.
Two numbers being repeated by re
quest—the Strauss “Valse a la Win
terhalter” and the ballet, "The
Merry Wives of Windsor”—will com
plete the "Fridays at Nine” pro
gram. “Fridays at Nine,” incident
ally becomes “Fridays and Satur
days at Nine” once more, the en
tire group of dances being repeated
this Saturday night.
Among the artists to be featured,
in addition to Miss Hunter, Miss
Cole and Miss Gardiner (who will
dance Sibelius’ “Valse Triste”), will
be Mary Day, Dawn Tagi and Jack
Baker.
* * * *
Evelyn de la Tour, the noted
dancer who followed rigorous train
ing in the classic ballet with a
lively interest in modern work and
syncopated rhythms, will give a re
cital and lecture at the Wardman
Park Theater next Sunday after
noon at 4 o'clock. The program has
been arranged under the auspices
of the Dance Workshop, 1519 Wis
consin avenue.
Miss de la Tour, an internationally
known dancer and former head of
the ballet department of the Ruth
St. Denis School of Dancing in New
York, will describe and demonstrate
the technique of the modem bal
let, interpretive Jazz and tap and
rhythmic dance for body building.
_ H. M.
_ DANCING.
DARCE LESSONS
Cott Very Little
at ARTHUR MURRAY'S
*ach dance lesson costs
but a few cents mor^— i
but what a satisfaction
in the final resultl Un
der conscientious experts
fewer lessons are re
ouired to become a food
dancer, call for half
hour prlrate trial lesson.
ARTHUR MURRAY'1
1101 Conn. Art.
announced that Its researches reveal
that the typical Princeton under
graduate was nothing more or less
than an absolute prototype, with a
crew haircut, of Errol Flynn, two
flsted, stout-jawed movie idol.”
If any Princetonians are listening,
please remember before sending
around seconds that we are merely
quoting. We are not saying a word.
We are wondering, though, if a crew
haircut on Errol wouldn’t make
things tough for Llli Damita if their
home life is as tempestuous as re
ported.
m w w m
Other things. ... A postcard from
Director Frank Lloyd, now in Wil
liamsburg, Va„ on location, says:
"Today I used this ancient tavern as
a set for ‘Tree of Liberty.’ Wish you
could be here to see it.” . . . Late
bulletin anent the time and place
Harry James started his career. The
publicity department at the Opitol,
where the James orchestra opens
Friday, first thought it was a Salva
tion Army Band in Beaumont, Tex.
But now it goes back farther and
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing
National—Dark'.
Capitol—“Young Tom Edison.”
portrayed by Mickey Rooney: 11
a.m., 1:45, 4:30. 7:15 and 10 p.m
Stage shows: 12:45, 3:30, 6:15 and
9 p.m.
Earle—“It All Came True,” Ann
Sheridan in the Louis Bromfield
story: 11 a.m., 1:40, 4:25, 7:10 and
9:55 p.m. Stage shows: 12:45, 3:30,
6:15 and 9 p.m.
Keith’s—“Pinocchio,” the new full
length Disney: 11:35 am., 1:35, 3:40,
5:40, 7:45 and 9:50 pm. "March of
Time”: 11:15 a.m., 1:15, 3:20, 5:20,
7:25 and 9:30 pm.
Palace—“Grapes of Wrath,” hon
est and dramatic film version of the
novel: 10:35 a.m., 1:25, 4:10, 6:55
and 9:40 pm.
Little—"The Human Beast," with
Jean Gabin and Simone Simon’
11 am., 12:50, 2:30, 4:20, 6:05, 7:50
and 9:40 pm.
Belasco — "Louise,” with Grace'
Moore singing the leading role:
4:20, 6:10, 7:50 and 9:30 p.m.
Metropolitan—“Virginia City,” Er
rol Flynn rides again: 11:30 am., 2,
4:35 , 7:05 and 9:40 pm.
Columbia — “Northwest Passage,”
Spencer Tracy vs. the Indians: 11:15
am., 1:50, 4:25, 7 and 9:40 pm.
Open-Air—“East Side of Heaven,”
with Bing Crosby: 8:05 and 10:25
pm.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts, con
tinuous from 10 am.
finds he was playing drums with
the Christy Brothers Circus at the
age of 4 . . . “Foreign Cor
respondent” is the title Walter Wan
ger has given his film inspired by
Vincent Sheean’s “Personal History.”
The information arrives on a bright
sheet of paper indicative of the fact
that some of the boys in Hollywood
do know what is fitting today in
connection with the word “foreign."
. .. Just can't seem to get out of the
habit of writing about “Gone With
the Wind.” We can't see why we feel
it should interest you but the top
price for the triple-premiere to be
held in London this month will be
12 shillings, which is about $2.25.
Jean Muir Assigned
‘Lone Wolf’ Lead
Jean Muir has checked in at Co
lumbia Pictures to share the excit
ing adventures of Warren William
in “The Lone Wolf Meets a Lady."
Miss Muir play3 the leading femi
nine role of Joan Bradley, young
millionaire’s fiancee whose romance
is climaxed by the Lone Wolf’s solu
tion to a series of baffling crimes.
Produced by Ralph Cohn and with
i Sidney Salkow as director, the pic
! ture's supporting cast Includes Eric
Blore, Thurston Hall, Victor Jory,
| Fred Kelsey. Warren Hull, Roger
jfryor. Robert Emmett Keane. Wil
liam Forrest and Bruce Bennett.
AMUSEMENTS.
r ROONEY
<at hit very best) ... as
. “Young
TOM SON”
fsj §*l«ttr * fl'frfi liMrtt*
• OR itkhl:i+l pcA60H
VILMA and BUDDY
EBSEN
- MARJORIE GAINSWOTH
) ou II talk about it
lor years!
JOHN STEINBECK'S
“The GRAPES
OF WRATH”
Kmtj FmmU • JaatBanMO
taka tarra4iaa*CkarH« (rafnla
Cmumq “REBECCA”
v:- the men who mode
''Gone With the H ind’*^J
um.m
SPENCER TRACY
NORTHWEST PASSAGE"
_in Technicolor _ j
MILLIONS OF
READERS
of the famous novel
await Laurence Olivier,
hero of “Wuthering
Heights”, as romantic
Max do Winter in .. .
“Rebecca"
FRIDAY TVc PALACE
After They’ve Gone Away,
Hollywood Wants Them
Ann Miller and Betty Grable Find #
They Are in Demand Following
Return to Broadway
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD.
"Isn’t this screwy?’’ says Ann Miller as she leaves the sound stage
at R-K-O Radio, where she had been tested lor a picture titled, "Have
It Your Own Way.” “They had me under contract here two years ago,
but didn’t take up my option. I was fed up and went back to Broadway.”
Now Ann Is back in Los Angeles, the star of George White’s "Scandals,"
and every studio is begging for the privilege of putting her under con
tract. The same thing happened
witn Betty arable, who was
around here tor years without get
ting any place_ _
—until she went
to New York and
got a top part in
“Du Barry Was
a Lady.” Then
all the studios
here suddenly
discovered how
much they
needed her.
Betty comes
back soon to
star lor Twen
tieth Century
Fox. Yes. Holly
wood is certainly
a bit on the Sh«ll»h Graham,
screwy side.
It Errol Flynn wants to sell that
10 acres he owns near the Mulhol
land highway, he can make—so
I’m told by a local real estate agent
—a profit of >50,000. The recently
built highway has sent the value
of property In that neighborhood
skyward. But I doubt whether
Mrs. Flynn will allow a sale—for
sentimental reasons. There Is a
garden on the place, the flowers of
which were planted by Llll’s own
fair hands—and which goes by the
romantic title, "Love’s Garflen!”
* * * *
Robert Preston was telephoning
on the set to a jeweler and ordering
a ring, “for the swellest, sweetest,
nicest girl in the world.”
"For Dorothy Lamour?” I asked
him.
“No, for my 90-year-old grand
mother,” he giggled. Do you think
he was fooling? . . . George Brent
has suddenly discovered that Olivia
AMUSEMENTS.
I NEW added attraction
"mflRCM OF TMI!"
DEANNA DURBIN
in "ITS A DATE"
Constitution Hull, Ibis Etc., 8:30 I*. M.
World-Famous Pianist
HOROWITZ
la Frrwa la Recital—**.20, *2.211.
Mr,. Dane,’,. 1*00 G. Dree*’,. N A. list
Bax Office at Hall Open, 2 F. M.
Tomorrow, 8:38 P.M. Constitution Hall
NATIONAL SYMPHONY
HANS KINDLES, Conductor
FINAL MIDWEEK CONCERT
Soloist.
MILLARD TAYLOR, Violinist
Works by Bach. Morart. Chausson.
Roussel and Warner.
SEATS. BOc to $2.50 at Symphony Bo*
Office, Kltt's, 1330 G St. NA. 7332.
C. C. Cappel. Manager.
TRANS-LUX Hill IK- R *
FRENCH FOREIGN LEGION OFF I
FOR WAR PENNA. FLOODS I
. ALGERIA : BERMUDA . -1
DISNEY I
la SHORT SUBJECTS 1^ = 1
^ Apr. 13
Will Open at 1 PM.
FOR THE SEASON
OVER SIOO.OOO.O*
EXPENDED FOR NEW
FEATURES, INCLUDING
“FLYING SCOOTER,”
THE LAST WORD IN
THRILL RIDES
PAUL KAIN AND HIS
ORCHESTRA AT THE
BALLROOM 9 TO 12
ON WEEK NIGHTS ONLY
De Havilland is the one girl in his
life, and is bombarding her with
flowers. They start work this week
in the picture “Episode,” which, of
course, is pure co-incidence . , .
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., has ac
cepted no picture assignments since
he finished "Safari” about two
months ago. He wanted to be
absolutely free to devote himself to
his wife, who is expecting a baby
toward the end of this month.
* * * *
Monday on the Cecil B. De Mllle
set is known as “blue Monday.” It’s
the day of De Mille's weekly broad
cast, and he is inclined to be jittery.
When actors are slow on Monday,
De Mille’s sarcasms are more pointed
than usual. I heard him recently
castigate an actor who blew up: "Do
you realize that youi stupidity is
costing Paramount $300 a minute?”
Of course, this only made the lad
more nervous—and Paramount lost
a lot more. In an effort to soothe
De Mille’s ruffled feathers, he has
been assigned an extra “yes” man
for Mondays.
(Released bj the North American
_Newapaper Alliance. Inc.)
AMUSEMENTS.
“Masterpiece .,, absorbs you
every minute, if you have
the courage to sit there..
I MacArthur, Evening Star
Jean Gabin-Simone Simsn
ACADEMY °f *?J1.,S"g V?*****’
E. Lawipn-' PMlMi?' T-«■>'»»■ Boautiful
Continuous From S:«W P.M.
“RULERS OF THE SEA.”
Starring DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS. JR
MAROARET LOCKWOOD and WILL
FYFFE.
Also
BORIS KARLOFF In
“THE FATAL HOUR.”
ATI AS 1331 H 8tTN.E. AtlT*300
Matinee 1 F.M.
Double Feature. "HIS GIRL FRIDAY."
with CARY GRANT. ROSALIND RUS
SELL and RALPH BELLAMY. Also
RANCHO GRANDE." with GENE
AUTRY. SMILEY BURNETTE and JUNE
8TORY.
CAROLINA11"1 * N C A™ s e
CHARLES LAUGHTON In "JAMAICA INN."
and JOHNNY DOW'NS in "LAUGH IT
OFF "
CIRCLE renn* A”- « 2"‘ 8t
BURGES" MEREDITH BETTY FIELD In
' OF MICE AND MEN." Cartoon
CONGRESS ''B31 Nirho1’ A” 8 E
• I Aw ■ ? THE PAMPAS " with WILLIAM
BOYD. Popovs Cartoon.
DUMBARTON 1:1,3 wteeo"*‘" A"
SONJA HENIE and RAY MILLAND in
"EVERYTHING HAPPENS AT NIGHT."
Nows and Short SuWects
FAIRLAWN anacostia. d c.
"GRfeEN HELL.” with DOUG. FAIRBANKS.
_ JR. and JOAN BLONDELL.
rDECNRn T ADULTS. 2.5c.
uKEXnoLLl FREE PARKING
DOROTHY LAMOUR. AKIM TAMIROFF In
•■DISPUTED PA8SAGE.'' and BABY
SANDY. HUGH HERBERT in "LITTLE
_ ACCIDENT."_
I inn *7777 M St. N.W. NEW SEATS
lAinj Double Featur
"MEXICAN SPITFIRE." BOB MONT
GOMERY in EARL OF CHICAGO."
_ Dishes to Ladies __
I ITT1 T »th St. N.W.
U1 1 U> Bet. F and G.
EMIL ZOLA'8
“THEHUMAN BEAST.”
LYRIC GAITHERSBURG. MD.
JOEL McCREA. BRENDA MARSHALL In
"ESPIONAGE AGENT.
PDINnrCC H St. N.E. LI. 2800
rninvUJ Matinee at 1 P M.
CHARLES BOYER. JEAN ARTHUP. in
'HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT." Also
on the Same Program. EDWARD ARNOLD
__ inj THE TOAST OF NEW YORK "
CTANTHN 8th and C Sts. N.E.
JIAniUn Finest Sound Equipment
Continuous From 5:30 P.M.
“GULLIVER’S TRAVELS”
On Technicolor). Also JEAN HERSHOLT In
Meet Doctor Christian.”
BETHESDA ’"iJEKrS.*"
WL 4(1*0 or Brad. 33d. Free Parkins.
Double Feature.
WALLACE FORD In "ISLE OF DES
TINY " WM. HENRY in "PAROLE
FIXER/' _
HIPPODROME
Double Feature.
NELSON EDDY In "BALALAIKA.”
Alto ^OF MICE AND MEN " _
PAMPTI MT RAINIER. MD.
LAIIILU At 0:15
HEDY . LAMARR. SPENCER TRACY
in "I TAKE THIS WOMAN.”
HYATTSVILLE «£*
Phone*: OB. 0876. Hyatt*. 400.
ALICE FAYE FRED MacMURRAY In
“Little Old New York.’1
At 7, 0:30. Latest News.
_ Tomor.—Shoppers’ Mat. 1 P M._
Mil fl ROCKVILLE. MD.
1111 Lv/ Double Feature.
Today-Tomor.
Joe E. Brown in “Beware
Spooks.” Pat O’Brien in
“Submarine D-l.”
MARLBORO
ASMSSB; h5,a^.^t ln
NEWTON ,mJS*n2rtm
“BLONDIE ON A BUDGET." PENNY
SINGLETON. ARTHUR LAKE. Mat
inee at 1 pm.
JESSE THEATER
“Swiss Family Robinson,”
•raOMAS MITCHELL.. EDNA BEST.
SYLVAN •“
“DISPUTED PASSAGE,”
TAMmOFF LAMOUR «nd AKIM
PALM THEATER DELVJ“T
‘I TAKE THIS WOMAN,’
with SPENCER TRACY. HEDY LA
MARR. Also “Vatican of Plus XU."
FALLS CHURCH, VA. , '?X»
STATE < In "VIGIL
BUrtlnt 8uni "OONZ WITH
TOT WIND. — »to Now on Sol*.
LEE •• bon.”
b
g
I!
od
O*
a?
*5 £
■w *
wk
o
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C/5
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03 o
g3
K
_Theater* Hariri* Matinee*.
AMBASSADOR ;*.» &•£:
Mat. 1 P.M
ANN SHERIDAN JEFFREY LYNN m
"IT ALL CAME TRUE. At l:g»,
o:26. <:25,News.
BEVER1Y 15th * E N E
DETCIU.I LI MOO. Mat. 1 P.M.
Available to Patron*.
EDWARD G. ROBINSON in THE
STORY OF DR. EHRLICH S MAGIC
-SnHSu aA* L35’ 3:3°- S:3«
j .40. ».45._Also Newsreel.
rk I VFDT 2324 Hit. Are. N.W.
1 „ 1 WO. 2345. Mat. I P.M.
£*2*224 Space Available to Patrons,
f U55IBARD. BRIAN A HERNE
in VIGIL IN THE NIGHT " At
Miy^ftSlr5! Vr^ pet8
CENTRAL 4-5MEh4‘uNW'.
Onens in A.M.
FRED MscMURRAY an6 BARBARA
STANWYCK in REMEMBER THE
£ ‘Gtrt A* i <> r -.>>•>, :t 4u «-:t<
£20. ERNEST TRUEX In "LITTLE
OKV*E." At 11:45. 2:35. 5:25 8:18.
KENNEDY K,",n H ■ Near 4th N W.
iYc.mtE.ui RV nW) Mat p
I arbina *DS' A»p „ •, ,ri)n,
ALICE FAYE FRED Ma-MURRAY
in 'UTTLE OLD NEW YORK." At
l'-5 3:30 53' 7::i5 fi 40
PENN ,!M’ r» Atcpoc S.E.
LI 2'*n »at | P.M.
M*E WEST Y,\ C FIELDS in "MY
LITTLE CHICKADEE A- 1 “2 AS.
4.25. 6. 7:50. 0:35. Also Short.
SHERIDAN T.a. Ave. A Sheridan.
onciuuAn Rt ol00 Mal , PM
FRET) ASTAIRE ELEANOR PCIWELL
hi "BROADWAY MELODY OF 1040."
At 1. 3. 5:15. 7:2Q. fl an
Sll VFR r'» Are. * CnlMTllle Pika
nw. . SH*d B',0° m“ > I’M
Parkin* Space Svailahi- to Patron*
EDWARD G ROBINSON In "THE
STORY OF DR EHLRICH’S MAGIC
BUILET" At 1 .1:15. 5:;n. 7:S0.
0:40.^ Also New .tree'
TlVni? nth A Park~ Rd. N.WT
11 IULI r«l. mon. M,t , P M
CAROLE LOMBARD BRIAN A HERNE
in “VIGIL IN THE NIGHT" At
1:“Y S:"* 5-sn. 7:35. p 35 pete
Smith-* “What I* Your I O *" AU
Star Cartoon Show Snt n a m.
UPTOWN c"nn- Are A Newark.
ul 'V"1' WO .rtno Mat 1PM
n C**S»-* Sn,I|,M. • n Pll'iina
FLFAVOR POWFTjT. pr»vr»
iw, "Mp^rntt^r RfT*T/'lTVr ,»
At t :9Q &:•*% ftrso, ? 040
Theater* RaTini Perform a nr et
APOLLO
RONALD COLMAN. IDA LUPINO In
■ THE UQHT THAT FAILED. " At
(I, 7:50, 9:45._Also shorL_
AVALON *•** wonn-inoJ*: m
BURGESS MEREDITH. LON CHANET.
JR In “OF MICE AND MEN." At
5:45. 7^0._PpI5 Alao Short.
AVE GRAND MS
NELSON EDDY. ILONA MASSET In
BALALAIKA." At fl. 7^5.'<. 0:50.
COLONY '4“£>i£r HJf
SPEWCEB -rparv. hedv LAV A*-'
in "I T*KE THIS WOMAN." At «
7:50. 0:45_Al*o Short
HOME
SONJA HEN IE. RAY MIL LAND- th
"EVERYTHING HAPPENS AT
NIGHT.^_ At 6:18, 8. B:45. Short ;
V A l/| IV Jvao 14th SI. ».w.
JAVU1 CO. 4»Hs.
brought Back by Popular Demand.
MERcb OBLRON and LAURENCE
OLIVIER. "WUTHERING HEIGH, b."
At «. 7:50. 0.45. Short.
Cipn H■: 11 G». Are Silver Spring.
■JL.V.VA Shep. "540. Parking Space.
DON AMECHE. ANDREA LEEDS In
• SWANEE RIVER." At 6:15. 7155.
0:50. Also Short Subject. _ _
T A If AM A 4th and Butternnt Stg.
IAIVUITIAge. 4:117 Parking Space
"LONE WOLF STRIKES" At S.
8:50. DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS. JR.
In “OREKN HELL " At 7:15, 10.
YOPlf On. Are. and Quebec Place.
1 OI\ft RA. 4 400. Doom Open *50
MAROARKT BULL AVAN and JAMES
STEWART In "THE SHOP AROUND
THE CORNER " At 5:45. 7:45. 07)0.
Also Newsreel.
ARLINGTON. VA. r«,“Y?5.
VII CAN n- 1730 Wilson Bird.
nlUUIr 1480. Opo. Colonial Village.
ALICE FAYE. "LITTLE OLD NEW YORK ”
ASHTON 8100 Wilson Bird. .
AOrllUn Phon- fix 1130.
CAGNEY. OBRIEN. "FIOHT1NO BBthr
BUCKINGHAM ^ ^
D. W. Griffith's “BIRTH OF A NATION.”
ALEXANDRIA. VA.
pccn FREE PARKING.
HKE.U Phone Alex 3113.
RONALD COLMAN WALTER HU8TON 'In
"THE LIGHT THAT BAILED"
“GONE WITH THE WIND”
Starts Aoril is Reserved seats now onaalf.
RICHMOND Php:„r\..rn4«
JOHN GARFIELD. ANN SHERIDAN. PAT
O BRIEN to “CASTLES ON THE HUD
SON.”__ _
HISER-BETHESDA SELEffiT
At 0 and 8:30 P.M —VICTOR McLAOLEN,
“BIG GUY.”
At 7 and 0:45—WAYNE MORRIS fa
“RETURN OF DR. XT”
AMUSEMENTS.
Coming Friday
4th HIT OF SPRING PARADE
Jean ARTHUR
Fred & Melvyn
MacMURRAY DOUGLAS
in ColumbuM Laugh Hit
“Too Many Husbands"
on Stage — All New Personalities
“New Faces of 1940"
WIT SMALL - JOE JACKSON, I.
ROXYETTtS t OTHERS
aacTDir.M,
METBSPGIITAN
" CMN nuY
Direct bwm EarU Engagrmmt
m DOROTHY BOB
CROSBY UMOUR HOPE
in Paramount'!
“Road to Singapore”
am s*». a
ii%LOUISEJ
•ToniT6-i|
Bing
crosby cmvmfcyiJk
*t AST fJlH.g * \l !| I ,| J1 fTi
siot of V
HlAVtN”
*ius
LATEST NEV

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