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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 09, 1940, Image 7

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Chemists Describe
■ Coal Tar Perfumes,
Corn Cob Lumber
, Synthetic Scents Made
By New Process, Two
Scientists Report
By THOMAS R. HENRY,
Star Staff Correspondent.
CINCINNATI, Ohio, April 9.—Fra
grances of dew-wet gardens and
flaunting perfumes of old romance
are being synthesized out of an ex
tract of coal in more tantalizing
varieties than ever before.
A new method of building delicate
odors out of common chemicals was
reported to the American Chemical
Society here today by Dr. O. N. Jit
^ kow and Dr. Marston T. Bogard of
* Columbia University. The synthetic
perfumes they have produced, they
said, range from those of most of
the old-fashioned garden flowers to
the elusive, fleeting odors of fresh
fruits which hitherto have escaped
the chemist.
While the perfumes of roses and
violets may have been good enough
for Helen of Troy or Cleopatra,
they reported, the present-day belle
Jn the vastly more complex whirl of
modern life needs a greater variety.
How Aldehyde Is Produced.
The new laboratory method re
ported makes use of the so-called
Diels and Alder reaction, which
closely duplicates some of the reac
tions which go on in living plants.
They heat Under pressure a coal tar
product, trimethyl-butadiene, similar
to that from which the Germans
make ersatz rubber, together with a
common commercial chemical. The
result is an aldehyde, a chemical
Structure similar to the alcohols.
It so happens, they reported, that
this aldehyde is closely related to
the chemieal building blocks from
which vitamin A is constructed and
also to those from which chemists j
have been able to duplicate the
•fragrance of violets. In this case,
however, it serves only as a point of
departure from which come a con
fusing variety of odors—some of
Which duplicate actual fragrances of
* nature and others that may be new
to the world. This aldehyde is then
subjected to various chemical
processes. A typical example cited
in the report was the treatment with
acetone. The result has a distinct
odor of cedarwood. When this is
lightly diluted the odor changes into
the fragrance of violets.
Synthetic Lumber Shown.
Synthetic lumber harder than
granite and four times as strong as
iron, pound for pound, were demon
strated to the chemists today by
Dr. O. R. Sweeney of Iowa State
College These were made, he said,
out of cornstalks and cobs and other
agricultural waste, today the great
est source of raw material in the
world.
Dr. Sweeney’s samples ranged
from woods denser than the heaviest
teakwood to others lighter than
cork.
These products have been de
veloped over the past decade in
various laboratories throughout the
country, Prof. Sweeney said. Iowa
‘ chemists have taken the lead be
cause of the importance of the corn
waste problem to farmers there.
The synthetic woods, Dr. Sweeney
Insisted, offer no field for large
scale industries, but many of them
can be manufactured profitably by
small plants in agricultural districts,
which would afford part-time work
to the farmers and attract some
workers from overcrowded cities.
They are representative, he said,
of the sort of thing that must be
developed if American civilization is
to be saved from toppling from the
weight of its own centralization.
Milk Used to Make Paint.
Use of waste milk and sugars
from agriculture to make paints
and varnishes was described by
three Department of Agriculture
chemists, J. T. Stearn, B. Makower
and P. H. Groggins ol Washington.
pAMcEfo*
V
AND HIS AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA
A Star of WJSV-Columbia Broadcasting System
WILL BE AT
; Vlkl
HCH'O
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• ] AMUSEMENT PARK
BALLROOM
RENDERING SWEET AND SPICY
MUSIC OF THE KIND YOU LIKE
ROUTE K0 STREET CARS DIRECT TO THE PARK
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R« D. C. CONDUCTORS SELL SPECIAL 2Sc ROUND.
TRIP TICKETS.
AUTO ROUTE VIA CONDUIT ROAD. OR STRAIGHT OUT
MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE. NO CHARGE FOR
FARKING AT ANY TIME.
KANSAS CITY.—THE LARGER RAT DINED ON POWDERED
GRASS—Dr. W. R. Graham (right) and two co-workers, Dr.
C. F. Schnable and Dr. G. O. Kohler, chemists, today will report
to the American Chemical Society’s convention in Cincinnati on
experiments they’ve conducted to indicate powerful vitamin
content of powdered grass. The larger rat, at left, same age
as other, was given the same food, but powdered grass was
substituted in the larger one’s diet for a series of vitamins in
the smaller one’s diet. The chemists and their assistants, one
of whom, Charles Eggler, is at left, also have used the powdered
grass in their own diet. —A. P. Wirephoto.
They mix lactic acid with various
resins, the production of which was
more than 60,000,000 pounds last
year. The lactic acid, in turn, is
produced by the fermentation of
different sugars with bacteria. Glu
cose sugar from cornstarch, tactcse
from milk whey and sugar cane
molasses all are used in the process.
The supply of these agricultural ma
terials. they said, now is practically
unlimited.
The process, they said, seems to
hold so much promise for the utili
zation of agricultural waste that a
patent has been taken out on it in
the name of Secretary Wallace and
dedicated to the free use of the
American people. It will not be sur
prising, they said, if lactic acid be
comes one of the most important
organic chemicals of the future.
At the same time the chemists
ALL GLASSES
Complete with Examination
$7.50 no
I HIGHER
Why Pay More?
Thit Include•
• EYE EXAMINATION BY
MEDICAL DOCTOR (Oculist)
• Sinsle or Doable Vision Lenses.
Kryptok Bifocals Included
e Tour choice of oonalar styled soid
Hlled frames or rimless moantinss.
e Case and cleaner.
2-Year Free Service
were warned by Dr. Henry A. Gard
ner of the National Paint, Varnish
and Lacquer Association of Wash
ington that American chemists must
find some substitute, preferably na
tive grown, for tung oil, used as a
basis for paints, the major part of
European Unity Plan
More than 300 years ago the plan
of a United States of Europe was
outlined by the Duce de Sully, then
secetary to King Henry IV of
France, according to a French
historian.
PEARSON & CRAIN
Jewelers • 13th and G Streets N,W.
NOTICE!
All Nationally Advertised
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EXCEPTED!
• |
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APRIL 24TH
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PHI k U • l:JTH k«STS
■MBMMUJIWILEXS • ESTABLISHED 1 9
which comes from China. The trade
has been curtailed by the Japanese
war.
Tung trees, he said, are being
raised successfully in the Gulf
States but are not a dependable
source because of the danger of
frost damage. One substitute, he
said, is oiticia oil from a tree in
Northwestern Brazil. In the past
three years American imports have
risen to 19,000,000 tons.
An important development, he
stressed, is * the production of a
paint material from castor oil. This
can be produced in the United
States, but It is not considered as
good as tung oil.
Medicine and Candy
Made From Apple Milk
CINCINNATI, Ohio, April 9 OP).—
Apple milk is going to make both
medicine and candy and grapefruit
will appear in women’s clothes as
part of beautiful dyes instead of
stains.
These are discoveries of new
chemical processes reported to the
American Chemical Society here
today.
The apple milk was reported by
P. C. Vilbrandt and R. D. Sieg of
the Virginia Polytechnic Institute,
Blacksburg, Va. Whole apples are
ground to pulp. The pulp is mixed
with skim milk and a new food is
the result. Cost of the mixture, in
cluding labor and packaging, will
be about 1 cent a pound.
Flavored, the apple milk makes
good candy. For medicine it con
tains the ingredients of apple al
ready widely used for infant
diarrhea.
The grapefruit contribution to
colors comes from a new Florida in
dustry to make oil out of grapefruit
seeds. This was reported by A. J.
Nolte and H. W. Von Loesecke of
the United States Citrus Fruit Sta
tion, Winterhaven, Fla.
With the bitter taste removed
chemically the grapefruit oil makes
salad dressing and is used in the
textile industry to fix colors so they
do not fade.
President's Budget
Cut $50,289,851,
Tabulation Shows
Saving May Be Wiped
Out if Proposed W. P. A.
Fund Is Boosted
By the Associated Press.
Congress has slashed the Presi
dent’s budget estimates by $50,
289,851 In debating 14 appropriation
bills, a tabulation showed today, but
this saving may be wiped out if it
increases the proposed $985,000,000
W. P. A. fund.
The relief bill is the biggest ap
propriation measure still requiring
both House and Senate action, al
though the Senate has yet to con
sider six departmental bills.
A statement by Acting Chairman
Cannon that the House Appropria
tions Committe had done an “effi
cient” Job this session was chal
lenged in the House yesterday by
Representative Rich, Republican, of
Pennsylvania.
Declaring the committee had ap
proved appropriations for the next
fiscal year $1,000,000,000 in excess of
the estimated income, Mr. Rich
shouted:
“You’ll never get economy until
you chase the money changers out
of the White House.”
Jackson Voices Plea
For Retention of
New Deal 'Spirit'
Problems Still Remain,
He Declares in Talk
To Yale Students
By the Associated Press.
NEW HAVEN, Conn, April B.—
Attorney General Jackson, defend
ing the New Deal last night in a dis
cussion at Yale, said the problems
which confronted it still remained
and "for that very fact’** it was im
portant to the Nation that the
"spirit that has characterized the
New Deal” be continued.
He spoke at a session of the Yale
Political Union, an undergraduate
organization of which his son, Wil
liam E. Jackson, is president. The
topic of discussion, also debated by
student members of the union after
the Attorney General's talk, was a
resolution that "the policies of the
New Deal should be upheld at the
polls In 1940.’'
“I do not mean by any means that
the New Deal should be continued
in toto,” Mr. Jackson said. "No one
will contend that the New Deal has
>
Here is a table showing the budget estimates and the increases or
decreases approved so far:
_B*11- Budtest estimate. In cress*. Decrease..
Emergency deficiency . $271399,523 $20,176395
Urgent deficiency .. 60325,000 . 2,783,700
Treasury-Post Office . 1,043,646,512 10345,417
First deficiency . 94,089,843 2354,434
Independent offices .. 1,194,704,473 kfc74,704,473
Agriculture .. 788329,519 s$133,981,694 .
State, Commerce, Justice,
courts . 109,664,010 ... s2,585,010
Navy .. 1,077,479,137 .. hill,699,699
War Department (civil).. 220,081,801 x58391,000 .
Army . 851,473,094 h66,474,000
Interior . 122,057,469 .. h3,479382
Labor, Security . 965.988,642 h55,651,058 ..
Legislative . 25,785,612 82,077,892
District Of Columbia_ 49,609,418 hl332,701
Totals . $247323,752 $298313,603
kfc—Conference report awaiting final action by both Houses,
s—Senate-approved total, awaiting conference action,
h—House-approval total, awaiting Senate action,
x—Senate Appropriations Subcommittee total, awaiting action by full
committee.
WATCHES
DIAMONDS
SILVER PLATE
STERLING
JEWELRY
FLATWARE
NOVELTIES
CLOCKS
Also Fountain Pens, Desk Sets,
Compacts, Pearls, Costume Jewelry,
Men's Jewelry, Cigarette Cases, Fine
Glassware, Gold Knives, Waldemar
Chains, Men's Dress Sets, Emblem
Jewelry, Diamond Watches, Dresser
Clocks, Cameo Brooches, Dresser
Sets, Gold Bracelets, Electrical
Appliances, Religious Jewelry, etc.
Extra Salespeople
—to give service and to permit (as far
as is possible) unhurried gift selections.
NO C. O. D/s—NO CHARGES
NO EXCHANGES—NO REFUNDS
ALL SALES ABSOLUTELY FINAL!
brought a solution to all the coun
try’s Ills."
He added he would not attempt a
“specific" statement Identifying the
policies of the New Deal, inasmuch
as many of its measures necessarily
were designed as experiments, rather
than proposed solutions.
“The country was caught com
pletely intellectually unprepared for
the depression," he said, and it was
necessary to devise machinery for
relief and the solution of many
other problems “in great haste.”
In a brief question period Mr.
Jackson said “I’d give anything it
I knew what the future holds’* when
a student asked him when it would
be possible for the Government to
discontinue its spending program.
How wo«M roo like cook
for oil tko no loss trinkets
that are lying about the
homo. SeEngert wil gay
tko
Highest Cash Prices
for aR year old gold or
silver rings, pins, watchas,
oven dental gold.
mums AMY MEW
^ M PIANO in onr STORE7
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Choose from spinets, grands and uprights, new
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Knabe, Starr, Settergren, WurlitzeT, Kimboll,
Stieff, Lauter, Chickering, Steinway (used) and
many others. Lowest prices in the city. Slightly
used Spinets, $139 to $169; used uprights, $15,
$20, $25. Pianos for rent, $3 monthly. OPEN
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The PI ANO SHOP
MOMS Seventh St, JIT. W.
tm

W Sir!
We Said Two!
301 NEW SPRING
SUITS
Gentlemen . . . with ONE pair of pants this would
be a must on your list of things to do early tomorrow.
With TWO pair of pants you’ll have to get here
NOW, before the store closes, and make your choice
from an array of NEW SPRING merchandise that
shouts quality and value. And remember, sir, you
pay nothing down now—just $6 in May, $6 in June,
$6 in July, and $6.75 in August.
4 OPEN A CHARGE ACCOUNT
MONTHS TO PAY

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