OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 15, 1940, Image 15

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1940-04-15/ed-1/seq-15/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-15

if Established SO Years Ago 1
want it In a harry? Want It with*
ant rad taacT Confidential loans on
Diamonds. Watches. Jewelry. Guns.
Cameras. Musical Instruments, etc.,
at Lowest Rates Possible.
HORNING’S
Opposite Washington Airport
_ Ample Porklne Space
Take any bus from llth A Pa. Are.
Tsaoi Hast id
Large Storage Sale
Household Goods of
Every Description, Per
MoiiTiaiD' •°“l Effect*’ EtC*
At Public Auction
AT SLOAN’S
715 13th St.
WEDNESDAY
April 17th, 1940
At 10 A.M.
tt Order el the Colonial Storage Co.,
the Union Storage Co. and Others.
Terms: cash
O. C. Rloan A Co.. Inc . Aucts. t
Established 1891 j
Murray and Barden
Debate Wage Act
In Radio Forum
Members of Congress
Defend and Oppose
Proposed Changes
Senator Murray of Montana and
Representative Barden of North
Carolina, both Democrats, gave a
preview in a radio forum last night
of the fight to take place in Con
gress this week over proposed
amendments to the Wage-Hour Act.
In the American Forum of the
Air, broadcast over a Nation-wide
hookup and heard locally over Sta
tion WOL, Representative Barden
argued for his amendment that
would exempt higher salaried white
collar employes and agriculture
processing workers from the law,
while Senator Murray declared that
Congress would be “legislating pov
erty” in providing such exemptions.
Mr. Barden contended that the
administrator of the law “has been
doing more legislating by admin
istrative rulings than Congress did.”
He explained that his amendment
would clear up “ambiguity" in the
| act that permitted this situation.
S In his attack on such amend
Fixed-Payment Parcel System
Gains Approval at Station
The thrifty practice of giving a
Union Station red cap a tip on the
"third at Bowie” In lieu of a pe
cuniary tip will work no longer.
Nor will the equally frugal custom
of parting with a dime after a
porter has strained to the breaking
point carrying a load of luggaf s that
might make an elephant blanch.
These procedures were outlawed
at 12:01 a.m. today as a new system
of reimbursing the terminal toters
made its bow, the rates being 10
cents straight per bag or parcel.
Simultaneously, tipping lost its
ments, Senator Murray said that “if
we vote to exempt workers from the
just minimum wage provisions of
the act, we will be legislating pov
erty.” He then said:
“We will be adding to the relief
burdens of communities everywhere.
We will be legislating crime and
destitution for millions of helpless
citizens. Those who advocate such
a course are fostering discontent,
radicalism and economic ruin for
our country.”
Taking part in the panel discus
sion were Representatives Patrick,
Democrat, of Alabama: Coffee,
Democrat, of Nebraska, and Cox,
Democrat, of Georgia, and Miss
Josephine Roche, president of the
National Consumers League.
identity, being absorbed by the fixed
payment plan. Twelve hours later,
a period long enough to determine
which way the the winds of senti
ment were blowing, the scheme
seemed destined to remain.
If the traveling public disliked
the change it concealed it well. For
up to noon not a single official
complaint had been registered with
Stationmaster W. H. Marks.
Neither was there any confusion
or claims of “holdup.” The public
had been forewarned through the
press and the medium of printed
notices displayed on trains for a
week or more in advance.
The approval of the red caps had
been expressed at a meeting last
week. Whether they still feel that
way was a matter of conjecture. All
interviewed were noncommittal, ex
cept one.
As it works now, the porters at
tach pink identification slips to each
piece of baggage, turning the stubs
over to the passengef. When the
bags have been taken to the proper
destination, the porter collects the
stubs, together with 10 cents for
each article handled.
- The one Red Cap who felt free
to discuss the change wanted it em
phasized that the dime-per-bag rate
was the minimum—"but there’s no
law against giving us more.”
Canadian Premier
To See Roosevelt
While Visiting in U. S.
Mackenzie KiPig
At Virginia Beach
For Vacation
President Roosevelt is arranging to
see Prime Minister Mackenzie King
while the latter is in this country
on vacation, the White House said
today.
No time has been set for the con
ference, White House Secretary
Stephen T. Early said. He explained
that the Canadian Legation here
had asked if Mr. Roosevelt would
see the Canadian Prime Minister
sometime before he returns to
Ottawa and had been told that Mr.
Roosevelt would be glad to receive
him.
Mr. Mackenzie King arrived in
Virginia Beach, Va„ last night for
a three-week vacation.
There was no announcement of
what subjects he might wish to dis
cuss with President Roosevelt, but
it was considered likely that Green
land might come up for discussion.
Mr. Roosevelt has dismissed as pre
mature any speculation about .ap
plication of the Monroe Doctrine to
Greenland, a possession of Denmark,
but has started action looking to
ward possible Red Cross relief for
the Inhabitants of Greenland if the
German occupation of Denmark
should cut ofT regular supply boats.
It also is possible that the meeting
of Mr. Roosevelt and the Canadian
Prime Minister might be made the
occasion for completing an agree
ment on the St. Lawrence River
Great Lakes seaway and power
project for which negotiations were
renewed last winter.
Mr. Mackenzie King was quoted
before leaving Ottawa, however, as
saying that he was not coming to
the United States "with a view or
intention” of discussing the St. Law
rence project.
for LATEST NEWS
The Night Final Star,
containing the latest news
of the day during these
dramatic times, is de
livered every evening
throughout the city and
suburbs between 6 P.M.
and 7 P.M.
Telephone National 5000
for immediate delivery.
s* ' -r*\ 1 • ' ■ ■ 'wza
’EXPLODED AGAIN
wben former extra-priced gas buyers^
' voted by a big majority that
\VA< K : !’k (/• r '/ ;/.• Sy / ' </Uy:
\ ;-v\ rbfc ' >? f>'v >:> » v>
ouTr*ir^
P ****£*»**!! >43
:' . X •>
"NII BUIE SUNOCO CMS VS
iWHATWEWAN MOST!
PfeitlN A GASOLINE", \,
A- ■' / '-‘r i/'Zjk'AV. %»N
V ANTI-KNOCK
▼ POWER
/ MILEAGE
/ PICKUP
V ALL AROUND
PERFORMANCE /
l
I
^ f i:isn
-V %
W °
W IN A RECENT REPRESENTATIVE CROSS
SECTION SURVEY AT SUNOCO STATIONS
BY ANOTHER UNBIASED AUTHORITY
lust recently a new survey was made at Sunoco Stations
by another independent and unbiased research authority
—to obtain opinions of a representative cross section
of motorists buying gas at those stations. Many had
previously been exclusive or occasional users of
premium* priced gasolines. When asked, "What do you
want most in a gasoline?" the qualities they considered
most important were Anti-Knock, Power, Mileage, Pickup
end All-around Performance. When asked, "Does
Nu-Bhxe Sunoco fill the bill?" on each of these qualities
they wanted, the former buyers of extra-priced
gasolines voted—by a big majority—that Nu-Blue
Sunoco does give us what we want most in a gasoline.
for best results use Nu-Blue Sunoco Ml strength.
Don’t dilute It with other gasolines.
Action Urged to Help Aides
At Veterans' Hospitals
George M. McNulty, national com
mander of the National Association
of Regulars, today asked for an
immediate hearing on the Sabath
bill which eliminates the compul
sory payment of quarters, subsist
ence and laundry costs by attend
ants of veterans' hospitals.
Criticizing the Veterans’ Adminis
tration, Comdr. McNulty declared:
"This practice of the Veterans* Ad
ministration in deducting the coi*fc
from the meager pay of these em
ployes has resulted in a group of
workers among the lowest paid H
the Government serevlce.
“As an outcome the morale of the
employes in these facilities has sii4
fered greatly, with a consequent
lessening of the service rendered
the disabled war veterans under
their care.”
Such costs have been deducted
from their pay, he maintained, even
though an employe lived, ate and
had his laundry done at home. ,
*
★ Free Parking Space
l«th and F HU. N.E. *
A*22 Georgia Are. N.W. o
A 8830 Georgia Are. N.W. * '"*
132.11 Good Hope Ed. A
2i1.G«®r**‘»w" Bd Bethetda A
4^^ • Georgia
ASM — _ W F > f . |>\ 814 12th 8t. N.W.
It^F M M V/ A A M f^ft\ 1428-28 Park Ed. N.W.
/AW ^ ■ w/ maw 4B\ 2938-40 14th St. N.W.
Ml—^ ]830 Benning Ed. N.E.
20th
II * E Cor. 17t*> * B 8ti. N.W.
II T V M A ft F\J ^ J J 2744 14th 81. N.W. .
Mil W A ft “ « M ^^B M 1832 Columbia Ed.
II ftj B 1 a • A B H^H I 82.-1.1 Georgia Are. N.W.
LAfl ■ Ml ft W ft W ■■ I 808 G SI. N.W.
Hrittarllle *
, Eome Prices Vary In Md. ’
A
Meat Makes the Meal!
Acme Meati Will Satiety You and Your Puree
I—|MILK FED VEAL)—I
SHOULDER CHOPS ib. |J)‘‘
Rib Chops » 25c Loin Chops "> 35c
Shld. Roast ">• 15c Rraast »• 10c
| CUTLETS »■ 391,
MEATY Pork Chops » 17c
c'«ed Strip Bacon >» 12V2C
CDCCUI V rBAiikia ...
BEEF
227'
31-H.EU ilEtK BEEF
LIVER
it 151*
WHITE STAR
TUNA
No. ifc I ^ C
can M *3
CAMPBELL'S
Soups
GREEN GIANT
PEAS
2-27*
Bonnie Oak Milk 4 25c
Fine Table Salt 2 „;'P7,.5c
Saner Kraut Lc“? 3 20c
Lord Balto Pickles Dj“" r 10c
Fresh Prunes 2 19c
Calif. Peaches H&: ” 2 25c
Meaty Cal. Prunes S lb 5c
Cel. Desserts •nd Puddings ^ pkga. 10c
Corn Flakes Whaat or Rica Puffs pk* Se
Buckwheat “SsSff- ^ 5c
NATURAL UNSWEETENED No 5
Grapefruit Juiee 2 46 oz 1
Really Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
TENDER GREEN
STRING BEANS^ib..lJ>c
Choice Ripe Bananas ,b 5c
Crisp Fresh Celery 2 9c
TENDER RED BEETS -h. 5c
Juicy CaiiL Lemons 2do* 29c
HOME-GROWN
Rhubarb
bunch
RED BLISS
Potatoes
4'49<
SELECTED
GUARANTEED
EGGS
do*. 20*
Crisco
or Spry
3 a 45*
PURE
LARD
3lb‘20c
Kraft’s Cheese Ar vX!" 2149c
Princess Table Oleo 2k19l
Shortening 3 1 39c
Shredded Wheat n. ..«. «« 8c
Maxwell House Coffee 1251
Win-Crest Coffee ' »12c
Coffee 233c
Boscnl Coffee 1 25c
Acme Coffee *3£J' 121c
Miracle Whip Kraft's 32-o*. jar 32C
DOLE'S HAWAIIAN A No.2 QQ.
Pineapple Juice ,,
_ nr nr No. 5 can 23c
Ovon-Frotli Victor
BREAD
16 oz.
loaf
(■old Sool All-Purpoto
FLOUR
1243'
I Prices Effective Until Wednesday Cloelnf, Washington, D. C.. Only

xml | txt