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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 24, 1940, Image 15

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Old Style Start in Blue Grass Presages Same System for Kentucky Derby
- ' A - ■ - ■ -----
Fear of Door Sticking
Militates Against
Bahr Gate Use
Bimmie and Roman Alone
May Race in Warmup
Of May 4 Classic
By the Associated Press.
LEXINGTON, Ky. April 24.—The
moot question whether the new
Bahr electric starting gate would be
used in the Kentucky Derby was be
lieved by some horsemen today to
have been answered by these de
velopments:
1. Announcement by Hal Price
Headley, president of Keeneland
Association, that the field in the
Blue Grass Stakes, a Derby prep,
would be started tomorrow from the
new Bahr gate, but that the doors
would be left open and the old bell
starting signal method used. (The
bell signal is used in the Derby.)
2. Disclosure that William Hurley,
trainer of Bimelech, Derby winter
book favorite and a likely starter in
the Blue Grass, had asked Keene
land authorities to use the old
method of starting.
Col. Winn Is tndecided.
Col. Matt J. Winn, generalissimo
at Churchill Downs, said in Louis
ville he had not decided whether
the new Bahr gate would be used
in the Derby.
It was understood that several
horsemen had objected to its use in
the May 4 classic.
Headley explained the electric fea
ture of the new gate would not be
used in the $5,000 added Blue Grass,
closing day feature at Keeneland,
as he wanted to avoid the possibility
of a horse being left at the post by
failure of a door to open.
The new gate has been used in
all races at Keeneland and there
have been no mishaps.
Meantime it was indicated the
Blue Grass might develop in an
unscheduled "match” race between
two prime Derby candidates—Col.
E. R. Bradley’s unbeaten Bimelech
and Joseph E. Widener's Roman,
which last week vanquished two
Derby eligibles.
Only Two Certain Starters.
“Big Bim” and Roman appeared
to be the only certain starters in
the Keeneland fixture with Bashful
Duck, another Bradley-B, a third
possibility.
In event of a two-horse battle
the winner would get a net ot
$5,325 and the loser a net of $1,665.
Col. Winn said in a statement
yesterday he had been studying
the new gate and "if the people
who make the Bahr gate can find
some way to make all front gates
open simultaneously or not at all,
and there is a man from their com
pany here now who assures me
they have a way to do that, then
we may use the new gate.”
He added an old-style Bahr 14
stali gate, ‘‘such as has been used
here on previous occasions, is being
shipped here to hold in reserve.”
Dodgers, 8; Bees, 3
Boston. AB. H.O. A. Brook'n. AB. H. O. A.
Blstl.Sb . 6 0 0 1 Gilbert.cf 4230
Loane.cf 5 14 1 Co'rart,2b 5 111
Has'etlb 4 2 8 0 Vosmik.lf 4 2 4 0
West.rf 4 12 0 La g to,3b 5 110
Cu'n'lo.3b 4 112 Camilli.lb 4 17 0
Boss.If 4 2 2 0 C'bine.rf 2 0 10
Miller.ss 4 2 2 5 Franks.c 4 4 8 0
Lopez.c _ 4 O 5 0 Reese ss 3 12 3
St'vich.p inoi Carl'tn.p 4 0 0 2
Err son d 1 0 o 1
"Rowell p 1 loo
Javery,p .0 0 0 o
tScarsell 1 0 o o
Totals 38 10 24 11 Totals 35 12"27~6
"Batted for Errickson In seventh,
tBatted lor Javery in ninth.
Boston _ 300 000 000—3
Brooklyn - 050 003 300x—8
Runs—Loane. Hassett, West. Gilbert
<-'■ Camilli, Cuilenbme. Franks (2). Reese
<21, Errors—Lavagetto. Reese. Lopez. Mil
ler. Runs batted in—West (3'. Gilbert
<4 >. Franks <3t, Reese. Two-base hits—
LoRite. Camilli. Franks. Home runs—West,
Franks, Gilbert i2>. Stolen base—Miller
Left oh bases—Boston. 8: Brooklyn, 8
First base on balls—Off Strincevich. 3: oft
Errickson. 1; off Jarvey. 1. Struck out—
By Errickson. I: by Carleton. 0: by Javery,
3. Hits—Off Strincevich. 3 in It, in
nings; off Errickson, 7 in 42j innings: off
Javery. 2 in 2 innings Wild pitch—
Javery. Losing pitcher—Strincevich. Um
pires—Messrs. Goetz. Reardon and Pinelll.
Time—2:15.
SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE.
Savannah, 4; Jacksonville. 3 (11 In
nings'.
Augusta. 3: Spartanburg, 2.
Columbia. 7: Macon. 5.
(Only games.)
PIEDMONT LEAGUE.
Richmond. 10: Durham. 3.
Norfolk. 4: Winston-Salem. 1.
Rocky Mount. 4; Asheville. 2.
(Only games.)
I
Kitries' Cocker Spdniel Is Tops
At Richmond as Other D. C.
Area Dogs Gain Honors
By R. R. TAYNTON.
8tar Stall Correspondent.
RICHMOND, Va„ April 24 —John
ny Kimes came to the Virginia
Kennel Club dog show yesterday,
saw and conquered. His parti-color
cocker, American type, Ch. the Great
Pilot of Wirehaven, entered for spe
cials only in the largest class of
cocker spaniels ever to be shown at
this fixture, topped as fine a lot of
American cockers as has been seen
in these parts for many years. He
was then pitted against the cream
of the English variety, Mrs. M.
Hartley Dodge’s imported Giralda
Colourful of Ware, handled by the
maestro of Morris and Essex, Mac
Halley, and the much-touted import
bowed to the little dog from Silver
Spring.
Vinton Breese, the popular all
’rounder who made the decision,
said the Pilot scored because he is
beautifully balanced, in most won
derful coat and condition and, above
all, moved and showed with such
merry grace that he was irresistible.
Local Dogs Score.
It was a big day for dogs from
the Capital area. Marguerite Jones,
also from Silver Spring, took the
miniature schnauzer puppy, Minquas
Bimelech, along for the ride. She
was overjoyed when he came out
of the puppy class with a blue
ribbon, defeating a very nice young
ster. Her gratification when he
came out of the winners’ class with
the purple needed to be witnessed
to be believed.
Frank A. Habicht made another
outstanding win for the Washington
area when his Ch. Russell’s Choice’s
Double took best of breed over a
I large entry, including several cham
' pions. His kennel mate, Russell's
Myra's Quarter, was second in the
American-bred dog class and Rus
sell’s Princess Tiny Tot was third
in the American-bred bitch class.
Those benighted people who think
that everything about the dog show
life is fun and joy, and who envy
the professional handlers who ap
parently make very good livings out
of just playing with the dogs, might
get a different slant on the situa
tion if they could have accompanied
some of the handlers on the drive
from Norfolk to Richmond.
• A Dog Show Life.
The trek from Norfolk started at
10:30. It was preceded by the
loading of from 8 to 20 crates of
dogs for each handler. Each crate
had to be carried by hand down a
long and wobbly iron ladder. The
run was supposed to be made in
time to get the dogs exercised, fed,
watered and settled for the night so
they woud be fresh for the morn
ing's showing. Two of the handlers
encountered blowouts on the trip.
One ran out of gas. At least five
trucks missed the turning at Peters
burg. Two of them drove 25 miles
out of the way and three did not
discover their mistake until they
were almost at the North Carolina
line. But all handlers and their dogs
were present and accounted for at
the mosque in Richmond by 5 o'clock
in the morning. Dogs were duly fed,
watered and exercised. Judging
started promptly at 10 a.m.
The summaries:
Sporting Broods.
Chesapeake Bay retriever—W. T. Waugh.
Jr.'s Native Shore.
Drake aolden retriever—M. 8. Crosby a
Ottprshaw Speculation.
Cocker spaniel—John B. Klmes’ cocker
spaniel Ch the Great Pilot of Wirehaven.
English springer spaniel—Mr. and Mrs
Paul Quay's Ch. Showman of Shotten.
. Tor Breeds.
Dhihuahua—Mrs. H P. Donnell's Phoenix
Chico Brussell Griffin, Mrs. H. C. Steer s
Collette of Catawba.
Pekingese—Mrs Richard A Quigley's
Rememham Deri of Orchard Hill
Miniature pinscher—Mrs. W. A. Atkins'
Minnie Mouse of Hilgervllle
Pomeranian—Mrs. Albert L. Palmer’s
Jollywee Moneybox.
XI Manchester terrier—Frank A.
Habicht s Ch. Russell’s Choice's Double.
Terrier Breeds.
Airedale Terrier—Margaret A. Bemlsh’s
Beaudclm Beau Toujours.
Bedlinaton .terrier—Col. P. V. G.
Mitchell's Ch. Tarragona of Rowanoaks
Border terrier—Anna C. Ewing's Gillian.
Bull terrier—Mrs John A Branch's Ch.
Kowhal Ladv In White
_ Cairn terrier—Mr. and Mrs. Charles F
Dowe s Fast S.eo of Carvsfort
-Fox terrier—Mr and Mrs. W. Holden
White s Desert Deputy.
Irish terrier—Glen Antrim Kennels’
Kelvin Irene of Glen Antrim.
Kerry blue terrier—William L. Day's Ch.
Prince Blue Steel of the Chevn
Manchester terrier—Janet Mack's Gren
adier Annette.
Miniature sehnauzer—Norcrest Kennels’
Ch. Wolf Anfiser.
Welsh terrier—Halcyon Kennels’ Ch.
Aman Sequence of Halcyon.
W. D. C. A. Tourney Scores
SINGLES.
CLASS A.
J Burger-345 F D Watson __ 339
H. Hilliard-308 G. Hall_330
O. Hlser_330
CLASS B.
L Warbis-325 D. Hurd_317
M. Mendelson.. 342 C. Litz_331
CLASS C.
H F Gallagher 358 T. Collins_307
R. Bell-336 W. Stetnbach __ 325
j- Burns- 337 J. Vogts_326
W. Thomas_339
CLASS D.
R- Bell. Jr._ 284 R. R Gray_290
A W. Mann- 320 R. Hendley_327
N. Genhart_319 E. Stack_ 313
E. Anderson-310 C. Stack_1 337
CLASS E.
J R. Chafin-317 C>. Fockler _"S3
W. S. Clegg- 335 P. M. Taylor __ 313
Jl P. Guy- 288 O. McGorljck -- 320
M. Feldstein_2i?l
DOUBLES.
CLASS A.
Robert'n 101 135 112 Jarman 102 122 134
Hayre 89 115 134 Krauss 112 111127
(686) 190 250 240 (708) 214 233 261
CLASS C.
Collins 125 145 158 Vogts _ 06 98 92
Koozee 136 117 102 Hughes 110 117 117
(783) "61 262 266 (630) 206 215 200
Goldb'e 100 07 104 Sullivan 104 98 120
Geary 136 130 115 Milbrook 104 120 101
(682)236 227 219 (656) 208 2(8 230
Welmer 115 102 105 Stelnb'h 107 98 132
Jenkins 98 166 133 Dove 102 135 115
(709) 213 258 238 (680) 200 "33 "47
Laue 95 117 120 Thomp'n 83 129 101
Arendes 104 95 83 Marvell 97 104 95
(614) 199 212 203 (609) 180 233 196
CLASS D.
Flynn 118 95 02 McFarl'd 87 118 103
Bell 125 117 112 Ander'n 126 111 92
(059) 243 212 204 (637) 213 229 105
Watson 120 05 80 Hendley 91 98 121
Seger . 109 106 112 Burns 05 106 106
(631) 220 201 201 (617) 186 "04 "27
Ross 112 94 121 Radtke 100 112 109
Troup 91104 114 Girton 121113 101
(636) 203 108 235 (656) 221 225 210
CLASS E.
Winkler 113 90 92 Clegg 110 103 82
Cruickk 86 116 135 Chafln 111104 100
(632) 199 200 227 (610) 221 207 182
CLASS B.
Royal Tavern. A. A W. Hot Shoppes.
Daly 135 124 132 Boteler 104 111 98
Kee 116 105 110 Harry 114 08 109
Heltman 110 122 124 Gurnee 110123 113
Imirie lit) 04 100 Stanton 99 120 137
McCame 117 100 125 Talbert 141167 140
(1733) 588 554 501 (1793) 568 628 597
Bv PAUL J. MILLER.
Edward Lasker and A. E. Santasiere
drew the last game contested in the
Marshall Chess Club championship
for 1940, thus definitely making
Internationalist Reuben Fine winner
of the title.
Fine's final score was 14-2. Milton
Hanauer ranked second with 13-3,
with former United States Cham
pion Frank Marshall in third place,
tallying 12-4. David S. Polland
registered 11-5, while Edward Lasker
and Herbert Seidman, youthful
Brooklyn College star, each scored
It was one of the most exciting
club tourneys ever fostered by the
Marshall Chess Club. Fine swung
around the Midwest and Atlantic
seaboard in a special exhibition
itinerary during the tournament,
interrupting his club play to do so.
In 1939, Fine outpointed Samuel
Reshevsky, American champion, to
win the American Chess Federation
title.
When the grand congress for the
1940 United States chess champion
ship gets under way on April 27, in
New York City, keep your eye on
Fine.
Recently Champion Reshevsky ex
hibited in Washington, but ill health
prevented him making a brilliant
showing.
Meanwhile preliminaries continue
In New York with 25 players seeking
to be among the six who will be
Wrestling Results
By the Associated Press.
INDIANAPOLIS—Louis Thesz n*m
S». Louis, defeated Jim McMill'eri 235'
Chicago <2 of Ji falls): Everett'Marl
I .all- 224. La Junta. Colo., defeated
Marvin Jones. 305. Florida (in min
utes): Bill Lee. 289 Alabama, defeated
Don^McMintyre. 224. Kansas (U min
permitted to compete along with 10
acknowledged masters.
QUEENS PAWN.
While. Blank. White. Black.
Rexhevxky. Turover. Rexhevsky, Turover,
Menxarini. Wagman. et al. et al.
Wimxatt. Rousseau. 17 B-Kt.T B-Q3
Knaun. Eaton. ]SKt-K5 KtxK;
F. Bowie Smith. lURxKt P-QR4
1 P-Q4 Kt-KB.'i 20 Kt-BG BxKt
2 P-QB4 P-K.'t 21 RxB BxB
3 Kt-OB3 B-Ktr, 22 RPxB R-Kt
4 P-K.'t Castles 23 R-Bft R-KtO
5 B-Q.'t P-Q4 24 R IB5)XP Q-Kt.'t
0K1-B3 P-B4 25 R-Rli Q-Kt
7 Castles QPxP 26 R-R2 R-Bl
* Bxp P-QR3 27 B-B4 R-KtS
!> Q-K2 P-QKt4 2SP-K13 K-R2
10B-Q3 PXP 20R-R1 R-Ql
11 PxP B-Kt2 30 Q-Q5 QxQ
12P-QR4 PxP 31 PxQ Kt-K5
l.'tKtxP QKt-Q'i 32R-R7 K-Kt3
14 B-KKt6 P-R3 33 R (R71-R4 R-Kt2
15B-R4 B-K2 34B-R6 Resigns
1(5 KR-B1 Kt-Kt3
This game was played recently at the
home of W. K. Wimsatt, sr., during United
States Chess Champion Reshevsky's per
sonal appearance in Washington. Follow
ing the game Reshevsky engaged Turover
in two ranid transit "blltzschfich" games,
the champion winning the second while
Internationalist Turover garnered the first.
The above scoring credited to the courteous
co-operation of Willard H. Mutchler. vet
eran chess columnist.
News From England.
The National Chess Centre opened
in London in spite of the war. No
tice reads: “Wartime hours—2:30 to
9:30 p.m., Monday to Friday; 1 to 6
p.m., Saturday. Large and well
appointed air raid shelter on the
premises.”
Mr. American, how would you like
your chess served under such con
ditions? At any rate, the National
Chess Centre now has 530 members
and each Saturday features light
ning chess (“blitzschach”). To cel
ebrate his 75th birthday anniver
sary, J. Mieses, veteran master, gave
a simultaneous exhibition against 22
players tb win 15 games, draw 5 and
lose 2.
April’s British Chess Magazine
continues to discuss “Evolution of
the Openings,” by one I. Konig, who
gives an analysis of the Queen’s In
dian. American Fred Reinfeld, in
“Practical Chess Endings,” takes for
his theme “A Piece ▼. Pawn."
(April 24, 1840.)
Cherner Motors. I>»ilr N*ws.
Bickell 100 128 117 Hogan 100 113 04
White 122 1111 102 Clark 107 90 86
Lambert 100 115 11R Doyle 98 119 129
Stump 1071131011 Lemerise lol 111 119
Wright 110 123 103 Graff 121117110
(1082) 545 588 547 (1615) 627 550 538
CLASS C.
_ _ Easy Marks. President Valet.
Eliff 113 120 82 Duncan 84 97 102
Lewis 100 110 113 Kuhn 115 107 96
McVay 125 102 105 Warthen 116 105 los
Kiesel 121130 141 DeRosa 121120 109
David'n 130 112 117 Thomas 85 90 1op
(1733) 596 580558 (1564) 521 519 524
CLASS D.
Cartographic. Panthers.
Snbier'i 104 106 108 Marvel 118 108 121
Spann Kll 96 102 Cissel 105 126 99
Weber ini 94 94 Scanlan 108 115 108
Marshall 110 92 134 Smith 111107133
Caspar 94 107 91 Thomp'n 94 109 89
(1638) 516495 527 U6511 536 565 650
CLASS E.
Aerial Survey. Faaier.
Payne 93 101 95 Tice 127 193 111
Waters. 87 102 110 Green 106 106 93
Brooks 97 02 08 Kennedy 118102 112
Rhodes 199 106 124 Bowers 110 104103
Wright 114 114 129 Bonifant 97 124 90
(1501) 500 515 556 (1612) 564 539 509
Terps" Frosh Stick Team
Gains Easy Victory
With the second straight win to its
credit after beating Baltimore City
College. 9 to 3, yesterday at College
Park, the Maryland frosh lacrosse
squad will have time to get in lots
of practice before its next engage
ment with Baltimore Poly on May 3.
Getting five goals in the first
period, the yearlings were fought on
pretty even terms during most of
the rest of the game, and were dis
tinctly outplayed in the second quar
ter when the Baltimoneans got all
their markers.
Bruce Campbell, who shot three
goals, was the key man of both
the Maryland attack and defense.
Fetters and Rabat helped hold up
the defense, which was ragged at
times.
Summary:
Pos Md Frosh. City Col.
G._Forbes _Courtney
P. Berry _De Manss
C.P. _ Fetters_ Pohl
F.D. Keller -Fireman
S.D_Rabai _ Cox
C. Campbell _ Starlings
S.A-Coster _ Guild
FA. _Vandenberg _ Medairy
OH.Grelecki _De Buskey
IH. Pavesich _ Walker
Score by periods:
Maryland _R 0 1 3—9
City __ 0 3 0 0—3
Goals—Campbell. 3: Vandenberg. 2: Gre
lecki. 2; Coster, Stevens, Starlings. Guild,
Mediary
Substitutes—Maryland. Gumnick, Price,
Edwards. Yost, Robinson. Kennedy. Brown,
Reckner. Armstrong. Stevens. Mariner.
City—Chesney. Kiernan. Hook. Chance.
Coblim. Gallon. Kerman. Johnson.
Officials—George Heil and Oscar Nevares
(Maryland).
[STAR]
I WORLD'S LAMEST SELIM I
I SINSLE EDGE BLADE |
u
Halted by Duke, Terp
Netmen Entertain
Virginia Today
Maryland’s tennis team, which
yesterday lost Its first match of the
season to Duke 3V4 to 5V2, after two
previous shutout victories, Was the
underdog again today In meeting
Virginia at College Park,
The Terps did not drop yester
day’s match without a struggle,
Duke being sent three sets in two of
the four singles it won. They broke
even in doubles, Allie Ritzenberg
and Nate Askin, Maryland's South
ern Conference champions, scoring
in two deuced sets over Buffington
and Ager in the feature.
Another double tilt was called a
draw when darkness set in after each
had won a set and the Terps were
leading, 3—1, in the third.
Singles — Buffington (Duke) defeated
Ritzenberg. H—1. 7—5; Ager (Duke) de
feated Askln. 3—3. M—i: Parsons (Duke)
defeated Phillips, H—4, 3—fi, K—0; Bur
kom (M ) defeated Antholne. t!—4. R—7,
f)—7. Hlmadi (Dukei defeated Baugher,
H—4. 3—fl. a—3; Royal (M.) defeated
Wilson. 0—4. R—7. »—7.
Doubles—Ritzenberg and Askln (M.)
defeated Buffington and Ager. 7—fi, 7—R;
Parsons and Anthoine (Duke) defeated
Royal and Burkom. 7—5. 3—7 Phil
lips and Hardy (M.) vs. Himadl and Wil60n
(Duke) called on account of darkness.
Five years ago—Mervln (Red)
Dutton signed to succeed Joe
Simpson as manager of New York
Americans hockey club.
Takoma Tigers Toiling
For League Opener
Takoma Tigers are practicing
every day this week in preparation
for their opening Montgomery
County League game of the season
Sunday against Bethesda.
Either Porter or Heft will start
pitching for the Tigers with either
Dowd or Adamson behind the bat.
The probable starting line-up will
find Heurer at first, Plttlglio at sec
ond, Valenza at short, Easton at
third and Maxwell, Meiklejohn and
Wade in the outfield.
Giants, 1; Phils, 0
N Y. AB. H. O. A Phlia. AB. H. O. A.
Rucker.cf 3 (> 2 o Schulte.'.’b 4 0 4 2
Jurges.ss 4 13 2 Martin.cf 3 1 I 0
De'aree.lf 4 12 0 Klein.rf 3 0 2 0
Ott.rf 2 0 o 0 Ar'vit&.lf 4 12 0
Danning.c 4 16 3 Suhr.fb 3 18 0
Younrlb. 4 2 12 0 Warren.c. 3 0 0 1
Vitek.2b 3 0 2 4 May.3b 3 0 0 3
W head.Sb 3 0 12 Sch'ctn.ss 2 O 1 3
Oumbert.d 4 0 0 4 'Mueller 1 0 0 0
_ . , — — -Braaan.ss 0 0 0 1
Totals 31 6 27 14 Hlabc.p 2 10 3
’Benla'in 10 0 0
L. Br wn.pO 0 0 0
Totala 29 "4 27 13
'Batted for Scharetn In eighth.
tBatted for Hlabee In eignth.
New York .... 000 000 100—1
Philadelphia ... 000 000 000—0
Run—Oumbert. Errors—Suhr. Scharetn.
Run batted m—Ott Three-base hit—Mar
tin Sacrifice—Rucker Double plays—
Higbe to Scharetn to 8uhr. Jorges to Witek
to Young. Left on bases— Philadelphia. 4:
New York 12. First base on balls—Off
Higbe,. 8; otf Oumbert. 2. Struck out—
By Higbe. 6: by Brown. 1: by Oumbert. 6.
Hits—Off Higbe, 4 In 8 Innings off Brown.
1 In 1 Inning Wild pitch—Higbe. Losing
•iltcher—Higbe. Umpires—Messrs. Ballan
fant. Campbell and Klem Time—1 :40
Doubles Sweep Gives
A. U. Racketers Win
Over Catawba
Victory in the first three singles
matches and a sweep of the doubles
gave American University’s tennis
team a 6—3 win over Catawba yes
terday at Columbia Country Club as
the Eagles’ record again neared the
.500 mark for the season. They now
have won two and tied one match in
six starts.
The visitors managed to break
even by taking the Nos. 4. 5 and 6
singles matches, although Barty
Reese and Hal Evans carried their
opponents to three sets before bow
ing.
Summaries:
Single*—Fausold (A. U.) defeated Tow
son, fi—1. «—3; Webb (A U.t defea'rd
Moorhead, fl—4. fl—<); Landsman (A. U.)
defeated Holshouser. 7—S, fi—0; Tomlin
son (Catawba) defeated Evans. 1—fi. 7—5.
fi—3: Bridges (Catawba) defeated Orwehr.
fl—3. B—3; Hoke (Catawba) defeated
Reese, fl—1, 3—H. fl—3.
Doubles—Fausold and Landsman (A. TJ )
defeated Towson and Moorhead fi—3,
(1—4; Webb and Gewehr (A. D.) defeated
Tomlinson and Bridges. 0—fl. fi—3. fi—3;
Evans and Reese (A. U.) defeated Hols
houser and Carroll, 1—t). 6—3. 0—4.
Today a year ago—Belalr
Stud’s Johnstown broke Jamaica
track record for mile and 70
yards .running distance in 1:404s,
one-fifth of a second slower than
American record.
Texas Congressman
To Address Cards
Representative E. Ewing Thom
ason of El Paso, Tex,, has accepted
an invitation to speak at Catholic
University’s seventh annual athletic j
dinner, it was announced today.
Principal speaker will be Dr. H. C.
Byrd, president of the University
of Maryland, and toastmaster will
be the United States District At
torney Edward M. Curran.
^r. Thonlason greeted the Card
inals upon their arrival in Texas and
the Sun Bowl game and also saw
them play Arizona State to a score
less tie.
A's, 3; Yankees, 0
Phil*. AB. H O A N. York. AB. H. O. A
Miles,cf 4 0 .'i 0 Crosetti,ss 4 113;
Ch man.cf 1 0 0 fl Rolfe.lib 4 1 13
Moses.rf 2 0 4 0 Saikirk.rf 4 0 3 II
McCoy,2b 3 0 2 4 Keller.If.. 4 0 2 0
Johns'n.lf 4 12 0 Dickey.c 3 15 1
Sicbert.lb 4 18 0 Gordon,2b 4 0 4 1
Hayes.c 3 14 2 H'nrjch.cf 3 0 2 0
R-u'ling,3b 2 0 0 4 Da'gr'n.lb 3 1 !t 3
Ba'c'to.ss 3 0 4 2 Hadley.d 2 0 li 2
Dean.p„ 8 10 1 Russo.p o 0 0 (I
Ch'ndrr.p 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 4 27 13 Totals . 31 4 27 15
Philadelphia_ 000 001 002—3
New York _ 000 000 000—0
Runs—Johnson. Rubellng. Brancato. Er
rors—McCoy (21, Crosetti. Runs batted in
Rubellng. Moses. McCoy. Sacrifices—
Rubellng. Hayes. Hadley Double plays—
Dahigren. Crosetti and Dahigren. Lett on
bases—New York. 7: Philadelphia, in.
First base on balls—OB Hadley, 7; off
Dean, 2; oB Russo. 2. Struck out—By
Dean. 3; by Hadley. 3: by Russo. 1 Hits—
Off Hadley. 4 in 8>:, innings; ofl Russo,
o in 11 inning: otl Chandler. 0 in h
inning. Wild pitch—Hadley. Losing pi'cher
—Hadley. Umpires—Messrs Hubbard.
Rommel. Moriarty and Aue. Time—1:57.
Bucs, 3; Cubs, 2
Chicago. AB.H. O A Plfurgh AB. H O. A.
Hack..'.b 3 o ii 1 Han ey.3b 4 n 0 0
Her an.2b 4 2 3 2 Elliott,cf 4 110
Galan.cf .3 0 5 0 V'ghan.ss 4137
Leiber.rf 3 10 1 Rizzo.lf 3 12 0
Dal’dro.lf 4 0 0 0 fGarms 0 0 0 0
Russell.lb 4 2 8 1 V Rob s.rf 4 3 4 0
Todd.c 4 10 2 Fl'cher.lb 3 1 13 0
St'geon.ss 4 0 3 5 fJDavis 0 0 0 0
French,p„ 4 10 0 tP.Waner 110 0
Page.p _ 0 0 0 0 Young.2b 2 12 5
— --Mueller.c 2 0 10
Totals 33 7*25 12 tBrub'ker 10 0 0
Berres.c 0 0 1 O
McF'den.p 2 0 0 2
ttBell 10 0 0
Brown.p_ 0 0 0 0
Totals ai ”0 2714
•One out when winning run was scored.
tBstted for Mueller in eighth.
ItBatted fr.r MacFayden in eighth.
}Ren for Rizzo in ninth.
tlBatted for Fletcher In ninth.
IBatted for Davis In ninth.
Chicago _ 002 000 000—2
Pittsburgh 000 010 002—3
Runs—Hack, Herman. Vaughan. Garms.
Fletcher. Error,;—Vaughan. Young Runs
batted in—Leibcr. Mueller. P Waner <2>.
Two-base hits—Herman. Russell. Three
base hit—Vaughan. Sacrifice—Letber Dou
ble plays—Young to Vaughan to Fletcher.
Todd to Sturgeon. Lelt on bases—Chicago.
8: Pittsburgh. 5 First bas« on balls—Off
MacFayden. 2; oft French. 1. Struck
out—By French. .') by MacFayden. 1: by
Brown. 1. Hits—Off MacFavden. 0 in 8
innings; off French. 8 in 8‘. innings: off
Brown. 1 in 1 inning: off Pace. 1 In 0
inning Hit by pitched ball—Bv French
iRizzoi, by MacFavden ‘Hack! Winning
pitcher—Brown Losing pitcher—French.
Umpires—Messrs. Dunn. Stark and Sears.
Time—2:20.
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