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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 05, 1940, Image 12

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^Film’s Big Bosses Decide
i’No’ on. War Themes
i:
Decision at Last Looks Quite Final;
So Does Bette Davis’ on Intent
S' To Play Her Tragic Roles
iV By JAY CARMODY.
Tt is neither likely nor desirable that the movies shall go completely
gay for the duration of the war. but a decision has been reached with
reference to ‘.he war the ne. The decision is no.
What makes it likely to be final is that it was uttered by the New
York offices, not by the capricious minds which make up the programs in
Hollywood. The latter are subject to change without notice, but not the
lormer. When New York speaks, it'
:does so with the authority of the
bank account, which obviously is an
authority not to
be cha 11 e nged
unless the chal
lenger would like
to try art for
art's sake for a
while. That is
not probable.
The single ex
ception to the
rule laid down
;for the guidance
of H’wood. ac
cording to Va
riety, is that as
pect of war hav
ing to do with
American pre
Jay Carmody.
paredness for it. On tnat suoject.
• all reasonable latitude will be given
the studios on the theory that pre
paredness needs every possible en
couragement. Lassitude and indif
ference, or worse, on the defense
problem are attitudes the industry
is not merely willing but anxious to
combat.
War in Europe as a film subject is
out for one reason because it has
not proved profitable in spite of the
fact that it has produced such ex
cellent films as "The Mortal Storm”
'and "Waterloo Bridge." These ar
tistic fimis. peopled with some of the
(brightest box-office names in the
(profession, have not enjoyed the
•success their production costs and
fundamental entertainment value
•merited. It is taken as an unmis
takable sign that the public wants
another kind of movie.
* * * *
The decision ordering a blackout
of the war theme does not mean the
movies are going in for pure sweet
ness and lightness of subject. They
have demonstrated a distinct flair
for handling somber drama on the
•personal scale in dozens of recent
‘instances. Moreover, the public has
•demonstrated a willingness to ac
cept these tales of individual tragedy
jas part of the normal arrangement
•of life.
• It dislikes the abnormal derange
!ment of the times too much, how
'ever. to encourage more movies on
’the theme.
I
It is a truism that Bette Davis
has a mind of her own. Through
out her career she has been ex
pressing it to employers, directors,
acting associates and no doubt the
lesser citizens whose lives and hers
have touched in passing.
Miss Davis’ possession of that
kind of mind probably makes vain
the hope that she may some day
play lighter roles than those which
have made her the screen's greatest
figure. Her declaration this week
that she does not want to play
comedy, that she is a dark-hearted
girl who goes for sad roles, prob
ably ought to be taken as final.
Whether they like it or not, those
of her fans who feel she is putting
callouses on their emotions will
have to accept it.
The fact that Katherine Cornell
eould renounce tragedy for a while,
even for a comparatively weak
comedy like “No Time for Comedy,”
is not going to influence Miss Davis.
* * * *
Just how definitely cinema chil
dren today escape being thrown out
on their floppy ears when they
reach the gawky age is another
thing to be seen in the Hardy se
ries. Latest of the films, “Andy
| Hardy Meets a Debutante,'' has four
who went right through the awk
ward age without having crashed
the gates of oblivion.
There's Mickey Rooney, for in
stance, who began his cinema life
at the age of 6; Ann Rutherford. 5;
, Judy Garland. 6. and Cecelia Parker,
P J'lgiVY RIVER
TD,,>‘
,.r. 2
i 1 ——
i Pf5mfflWS»iTt<r.ttl
i k % j { | r| I ■ ll.r ML )
I PjZ^y^AriMaMriLAJL«R«MMUtaaJMMfcjM
RIDE THE NEW STREAMLINER I
! Capacity. 2409 Pastcngers |
World's Finest Excursion Steamer A
i IMOON LIGHTS 1
| A NIGHTLY—Sallini ttm. 8:80 p. m. ft
\ —Except Monday and Tuesday M
J (steamer chartered). Free dancing Vi
J —McWilliams Orch. Air-Condi- W
? tinned Dance Deck. 60c Round. *
Trip. Sundays, Holidays 75c.
MOUNTVERNON
, t 2 ROUND TRIPS DAILY
\ Lv. Wash. 9:80 A.M. A 2 P.M. Ar.
1 back in Wash. 1:45 P.M.-6:45 PJft.
A Ap. lti hrs. stopover at Mt. Vernon.
2 85c Round Trip. This includes ad
| A mission to Mt. Vernon grounds. *
l MARSHALL HALL PARK
I ^ FREE ADMISSION TO PARK »
A Leave daily 9:80 A.M. — t P.M. I
j Rides, Amusements. Athletic Field. [
• f Park Restaurant. Free Picnio f
Groves. Adults Round Trip, 55c. //
Children Under 12. 25c. Vi
| KIDDIES’ DAYS—Every Monday V\
l and Friday. Kiddies under 12. y\
A 15o round trip. Children 12 and V
> over and adults, 80c. All rides at V
r Marshall Hall Park half-rate. L
Tickets good on 9:30 a. m. and V
2 p. m. trips only. /j
Special Discounts to Organizations.
\
MADRILLON RESTAURANT. Washington
Building, loth and New York Ave. The
favorite place to dine, the popular place
to dance._
LOG TAVERN INN. Richmond Hgwy. Dine,
dance "under the stars.” Howard Pyle's
music. Dancing rain or moon. No cover.
Virginia fried chicken a specialty
SHOREHAM TERRACE. Connecticut at
Calvert. Dining and dancing Two floor
shows. 9:30 and 11.30 Dinner. $2. m
. eluding cover. Supper co^er. 50c AD. 0700.
MARYLAND CLUB GARDENS, on Marlboro
Pike. Featuring Nadine and her co-ed
band. De Luxe dinner $1.25 Dancing
until ? o'clock. Phone Hillside 0000.
THE NIGHTINGALE. Richmond Hgw.v., 3
Mi. south of Alex Dancing. 9:30 to 1
nightly •rcludir.T Sun. Sweet swing by
Radd RafFd's Orchestra Temple 4340
BAY ADA IS IlOliS.:—Overlooking White
, Bouse at Kith and H Sts. Dining in an
•tm^.pherr of charm, d gnity and een
tilify L’ln-hc'n s.'ic; dinner from $125.
g Crgn mi; .c nightly during d nnei
SaIXBO’V TO'IM. H-mlltor. Hatel. I 1th
• It K C i■! and dinner dancing. 5-0;
•upper riRp'. ->, to Milt Davis' Orchestra.
- tV-i. Mm. Saturday only, SI. DI. 2680.
who was virtually an old lady of 9
when she began.
Significant, that's what it is.
* * * *
Add author’s indorsements of Hol
lywood's new technique for han
dling adaptations of popular fiction:
“When ’All This and Heaven,
Too’ was bought for motion pic
tures I received many dire warn
ings that once my book reached the
screen I might not recognize the
story or the caracters I had written.
So I was prepared for possible dras
tic changes in the transition from
the printed page to the screen. But
the adapting of this material has
been a revelation to me of what
sympathetic handling of a book
can be.
"I feel that in all essentials the
screen version is not only the book
as I wrote it but a projection of the
characters themselves, heightened
by the art of Miss Davis and Mr.
Boyer and an extraordinarily fine
supporting cast.”
It was signed, of course, by Rachel
Field.
Won’t Be Marriage
Whatever happens to Irene Rich
in the course of her newly resumed
screen career, it will not be marriage.
Irene is positive on that score. She
said so herself at Columbia Studios,
where she is appearing in the char
acter role of Brian Aherne's wife in
“It Happened in Paris.”
“I'm through with marriage," said
*he beautiful actress who looks upon
her return to Hollywood as a joyous
experiment after seven years" de
voted almost exclusively to stage and
radio.
“I'm so tickled to wdn these char
acter roles after being labeled for
years as a fashion plate that I'm in
seventh heaven! And I don't want
to spoil it.
“After all, I’ve tried marriage !
three times; why should I ask for
unhappiness? Understand. I'm not
bitter toward marriage as an in
stitution. but for me there will be
no more of it. I’m busy with my !
radio work and, especially now that
I'm again on the screen, I don't want
anything to interfere. Marriage is
one thing that can completely upset
a career.
“Lonesome? No. If any woman is
lonesome in Hollywood it's her own
fault.”
AMUSEMENTS.
. ** on'y ’’“"“l and l>“teJ !"
4%^a »“wUh‘P: av«>uis
* ** * »* heitt ;;;Pt * **»ot
*1 f0t8° h-lSlips meet hcrS
f On Stage
| Romance & Rhythm" tnHav
with such stellar Entertainers ■ VUCIJ
j NICK .BUSTER.LUCILLE #MURTAH
j LUCAS WEST PAGE SISTERS
! CBICK GAGNON Warner Bros. Cool
COMING JULY 12 “AH THIS, AMD HEAVEN TOO”
■-—. " .aMMa—^Mtaa
THE CLOUDS GATHER—And Margaret Sullavan and Jimmy
Stewart seem to be looking toioard “The Mortal Storm," in that
film story of Nazidom's beginnings, at the Columbia for a second
week downtown.
Rita Reports
With the reporting of Rita Hay
worth, the entire cast of Ben Hecht's
production, "Before I Die,” is now
assembled at Columbia Studios.
Miss Hayworth came to the picture
directly from her role opposite
Brian Aherne in "It Happened in
Paris.”
“Before I Die,” which is a tenta
tive title, is an original story taken
from Hecht's collection, "1001 After
noons in Chicago.” The author is
directing it and sharing production
credits with Douglas Fairbanks, jr.,
who is also star of the picture.
In addition to Fairbanks and Miss
Hayworth, the film features Thomas
Mitchell and John Qualen, the
"Muley” of "The Grapes of Wrath.”
"Before I Die,” which is being
filmed with the same attention to
detail that has made Hecht one of
America's most important story
tellers, is an Aladdinesque love story
set in New York's seamy night-life
haunts.
Filmed in a particularly low key
by Lee Garmes, the 'man who
photograpned Hecht's other produc
tions, “Before I Die” utilizes no
sets more than 8 feet in height and
in other ways employs devices which
further the impression of intimacy
| and the feeling of a large city
I closing in on Jihe characters.
Henry Fonda played more than
I 150 parts during his stock career.
He played all sizes and ages and
sometimes essayed as many as three
1 characters in the same play.
Weedy Finds
The World an
Odd Place
Linda Darnell’s
Pet Rooster Has
An Adventure
By the Associated Press.
HOLLYWOOD.
This is a record of Weedy’s single
adventure.
Weedy is a 2-year-old White Leg
horn rooster, owned and fed and
pampered by Linda Darnell of the
movies, lucky fellow Weedy was
born down Dallas way an undistin
guished Texas chicaen until he was
dyed purple at a tender age and
presented to Linda on Easter.
Weedy, unlike most of his fellow
gifts, who die either from too much
attention or of mortification upon
discovering they have been dipped
in some hideous pastel coloring, grew
up to be big and strong and proud.
And lost, of course, his purple hue.
Weedy sleeps in a special bed, eats
at the Darnell dining table and en
joys the same food Linda eats. The
other day Linda took Weedy with
her to riding academy to get him
out in the air, but she did not put
him on a horse. He is not that
i precocious.
She was waiting for her horse
when she saw Weedy had discovered
a flock of chickens. Leghorns, like
himself, too. Weedy had never seen
any other chickens since reaching
adulthood. So, she says, he actually
registered surprise. But not for
long
Then, like any other male, Weedy
began strutting. Two years of mon
archisms had not left him unaware
of his charms—nor of those of the
hens he was trying to impress.
There was a commotion then and
Linda saw another White Leghorn
rooster—larger, out clearly not such
AMUSEMENTS.
The Holiday Spirit
Still Prevails at
WITH ITS MORE THAN
50 FEATURES EVERY DAY
1 PM. TO MIDNITE
Swimming: Is From
.9:30 to 11:30 P.M.
Dnnrimr SfjirtQ of 0
SH—
Where and When
Current Theater Attraction*
and Time'of Showing
Palace—“New Moon,” with Jean
ette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy:
11:55 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:10 and 9:35
p.m. ' •
Earle—“Untamed,” a man and a
woman fight for the right to love:
11 a.m„ 1:40, 4:25, 7:20 and 10:05
pm. Stage shows: 12:40, 3:25, 6:20
and 9:05 p.m.
Capitol—“Safari,” Madeleine Car
roll finds Doug Fairbanks in a
jungle: 11 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 and
9:55 pm. Stage shows: 12:50, 3:35,
6:20 and 9 p.m.
Columbia—“The Mortal Storm.”
Nazidom bursts over Germany: 12,
2:25, 4:50, 7:15 and 9:35 p.m.
Metropolitan—“The Ghost Break
ers,” the Hope-Goddard team again:
11:20 am, 1:25, 3:30, 5:35, 7:40 and
9:45 pm.
Keith's—“My Favorite Wife,”
Irene Dunne is Cary Grant’s: 11:35,
a.m., 1:35, 3:40, 5:40, 7:45 and 9:50
p.m. March of Time: 11:45 a.m.,
1:15, 3:20. 5:20, 7:25 and 9:30 pm.
Little—“Storm in a Teacup." gay
a beauty as her Weedy—showing
several kinds of indignation and pre
paring to do something about this
ursurper.
He charged Weedy. Weedy fled
in terror to the arms oi his mistress,
disheveled, disneartened and fright
ened by the things in this big world
he was just discovering
Linda took Weedy home.
Weedy has been acting very un
happy lately.
AMUSEMENTS.
f~ ^“KEITH'S™
ALWAYS COMFORTABLY COOLED
thru Sunday, July 7th
IRENE CART
g DunnE GRBm
mv Favorite Wife
RANDOLPH SCOTT • GAIL PATRICR
TOM BROWN S
SCHOOL DAYS
1 SIR CEDRIC HARDWICKE
FREDDIE BARTHOLOMEW
JOSEPHINE HUTCHINSON
Va\ LI ITT 1 Mi
TRANS-LUX
AMERICA RESPONDS:
INDUSTRY MOBILIZES!
. PLANES IN MASS PRO- ,__
f+ DICTION i BOSTON. ETC. |ar<^
Lillie SHORT SUBJECTS |ZS =
British ’farce about the pup without
a license: 11 a m., 1:10, 3:20, 5:30,
7:40 and 9.50 p.m.
In the Country.
Cross Roads — "A Woman's a
Fool,” comedy attempts to prove It:
8:40 p.m.
Roadside—“Black Sheep,” mellow
melodrama, at 8:40 p.m.
AMUSEMENTS.
AMUSEMENTS.
CROSS ROADS
Bailor's Cross Roads. Va.
Through July 13
1ZETTA JEWEL, Jr., in
“A WOMAN’S A FOOL”
Curtain at * 40
All Beats at Box Office, Afte
k thriving '°uCrWroun<i °* ,\nl
fLl Wanting backgro ^ ,«g
!«»»aK* m,u*" )“"8U'
WteWroM*“'
!>V^- jrl
“Mr. KAUFMAN & Mr! BROvInv
(Sam Jack) -A * (Art) jA
# rfZti/AMSE££fON lnn\T"' *>1“ ‘.'"Vt1"'."? *
—————. -— 1 I
oBuster havers Olive George
Tiny stars of stage Or screen
Ed FORD & Whitey
‘Dog gone Ritsy
WELDON BARR
L LYNN ALLISON
t Song Gems
md New routines, rousing as a 4th of July
Celebration .... by the
RHYTHM ROCKETS
"today",""^M
Janies Margaret
STEWART • SULLAVAN 1
' f|*yer „CTU,t m#
The Mortal Storm I
THEIR REUNION
HAS WON THE
TOWN’S ACCLAIM
They're Glorious
Together Again!
MacDCNAID
idy
in the thrilling romantic musical love story of
the handsome pirate and the untamed beauty
ntui moon
with
MARY BOUND • GEORGE ZUCCO • N. B. WARNER • GRANT MITCIELl
!o sod on tho Mutieol OporoHo "NEW MOON"
I..t Lynu by OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN 2nd, FRANK MANOR
and LAURENCE SCHWAB. ** t, SIGMUND ROMBERG
Seroon Hoy by JACQUES BEVAL and ROBERT ARTROI
froduetd and Dirttltd by ROSiRT Z. IIONARD
A METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURE
THRILLING THOUSANDS Q A I IAF
AT LOEW’S COOL in L H V k

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