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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 07, 1940, Image 12

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All Soap Box Racers
To Be Turned in for
Inspection Tomorrow
Each Boy Must Take
Completed Car to Dealer
He Registered With
The 1540 model Soap Box Derby
facers tomorrow will be taken from
the basements, woodshops and ga
rages where they have been con
structed during the summer and
turned in for inspection before the
third Washington coaster race next
Saturday.
According to instructions mailed
to each Derby entrant last week,
each boy is to turn his completed
racer in tomorrow to the Chevrolet
dealer where he registered for the
Derby. Every racer who expects to
compete next Saturday should have
his car turned in by 5:30 pjn. At
the dealer's salesroom, his car will
receive a preliminary inspection and
he will receive his driver's license.
The miniature racers, each of
which is boy-built and has cost no
more than $10, wdll then be trans
ported to the Randle Heights School,
on Thirtieth street S.E., off Penn
sylvania avenue, where the final in
spection will be conducted this week.
Important Radio Program.
Last-minute hints on construction
phases to check will be listed today
by Derby Director Zeb T. Hamilton
in a broadcast over Station WMAL
beginning at 2:06 p.m.
Important information about the
third running of the coaster race
here will be given on the nine
minute special radio program, which
should not be missed by any Derby
entrant.
"According to the postcards re
turned by Derby entrants to head
quarters, the field of racers on Derby
Day, July 13. will be more than 200
boys,” Mr. Hamilton said. "From
the quality of th ecars which tried
out on the Pennsylvania avenue
course last week, I feel that we're
going to have the best Derby yet.
I know the competition will be keen
and the races close.”
The Derby race course this year
will be approximately 1.000 feet long
and will extend from near the in
tersection of Texas and Pennsyl
vania avenues S.E.. downhill in the
direction of the Capitol to Penn
sylvania avenue and Carpenter
street.
Heats of 3 Cars Each.
The new concrete street is 50 feet
wide and is bounded on both sides
by concrete curbstones. Ample space
is provided on both'sides for spec
tators. who will be required to keep
back of a rope barrier placed 4 feet
beyond the curbstones.
The boys will race in elimination
heats of three cars each, with boys
In Class A. between 13 and 15 years
old. racing against each other to
choose a champion, and the 11 and
12 year old boys in Class B also
choosing a champion. The two
class champions then race to de
termine the 1940 champion of Wash
ington. Carl Cerierstrand. jr„ 12.
won the city championship last
year, succeeding Norman Rocca, the
winner in 1939. Last year's Derby
was held on Massachusetts avenue
N. W., beyond Ward Circle, and the
first Washington Derby was held
on New Hampshire avenue N.E.
Most of the streets in the gen
eral vicinity of the Pennsylvania!
avenue course will be available for'
parking spaces for spectators, and
a map showing the location of the
course and the surrounding area
will be published this week in The
Star.
Legion Committees to Be Busy.
American Legion committees were
to go into high gear this week in
preparation for the big day next
Saturday. Woman Legionnaires
from the Jacob Jones Post again
will act as the clerks on Derby Day.
The committee is headed by Edna
Smith, post commander.
The Inspection Committee, w-hich
Is headed by John R. Weitzel. will
begin its work Tuesday of checking
over carefully the more than 200
racers expected to compete. Regis
tration for the Derby and the com
pilation of heats will be handled
by a committee headed by Douglass
O. Reed. Most of the heavy work
next Saturday will be handled by
the Checkers' Committee, of which
William H. Opitz is chairman, and
by the Finish Line Committee,
headed by Mack Clarke. Heywood
N. Saunders is chief starter. Miss
Martha Stewart is chairman of
the First-Aid Committee.
The entrants will report to the
course at 9:30 a.m. Saturday and
be issued all-steel Derby helmets
and racing jerseys by the Quarter
master's Committee, headed by
Charles Kohen. Announcers for
the day will include Bill Hargrave,
Thomas J. Collahan. P. J. Fitzgib
bons and Joseph R. Moore.
(Watch The Star for Derby News.)
Visit to the Cliff House
A San Francisco rMusfr
SAN FRANCISCO. July 6.—Known
around the world is the big, white
Cliff House, located at the extreme
western end of San Francisco, at
the entrance to the Golden Gate.
Kings, lords, dukes, statesmen and
Presidents have dined and wined
there, within sight and sound of the
barking seals on Seal Rocks, just
off shore.
The history of the Cliff House goes
back to 1858, when the first building
was erected with lumber salvaged
from a ship which foundered just
a few hundred feet from the cliff.
One explosion and two fires ac
counted for three different Cliff
Houses which have watched over
the Pacific.
Today the fourth structure stands
on the original site. It is a mecca
for almost every tourist who comes
to San Francisco. A restaurant and
cocktail lounge are in the main
building and adjoining is a large
curio and novelty shop.
On the seaward side of the Cliff
House a wide platform faces the
Seal Rocks, where several hundred
seals and sealions disport. Visitors
rent binoculars for a dime and
watch the big fellows sleeping, sun
ning themselves or swimming about.
2,800 Dog Licenses Sold
Assistant Tax Collector F. B. Lyd
dane announced yesterday that 2.800
dog licenses had beer, sold during
the first week, which ended yester
day. The tags are $2 apiece and
must be obtained by District dog
owners by the end of the month if
their pets are to escape the pound
master. Last year 2b,000 licenses
were taken out.
L
DOWN THE HOME STRETCH—Donald Phillips, 15 (left), and
Richard Hale, 13, are two of the more than 200 boys from Wash
ington and nearby Maryland and Virginia who will be competing
for the Soap Box Derby championship of Washington next
Saturday. In this picture the boys are trying out their home
made racers on the 1940^Derby course on Pennsylvania avenue
S.E., between Alabama and Branch avenues.
—Star Staff Photo.
Atlantic Control Is War Stake
For U. S., Maj. Eliot Holds
Maintenance of British Fleet Necessary
To Offset Axis Power, He Declares
By MAJ. GEORGE FIELDING
ELIOT.
During the past week, we have
had several useful lessons.
We have seen that the British
government sets so high a value
on sea power that it was willing,
even at the risk of turning a former
ally into an enemy, to take the
most drastic measures to prevent
acquisition by Germany of addi
tional ships.
We have seen the tremendous
moral value in war, let alone ma
terial value, of a bold and resolute
policy which is not handicapped
by refusal to take risks.
We have seen to what abject sub
mission a proud and warlike nation
may be reduced by the new "strategy
of terror,” once its organized re
sisting power has been broken and
the lives of its citizens are at the
mercy of a modem technique of
conquest as ruthless as that of Jen
ghiz Khan or Timur, and far more
efficiently equipped and adminis
tered.
We have had laid at rest the
rumors which have been going about
to the effect that Britain now in
tends to sue for peace in her turn.
We have been told that Nazi Ger
many does not recognize the basic
concept of the Monroe Doctrine,
and that Germany sees no reason
why some European nations, and
not others, should have possessions
in the Western Hemisphere.
Warning to Latin America.
We have read in Herr Hitler’s own
newspaper, the Voelkischer Beo
bachter, a warning to our Latin
American neighbors on the "unsat
isfactory” attitude of their press,
with a grim forecast that Germany
will never forget where she found
friendship, and where criticism,
when it comes time to adjust the
future relations of Germany and
Latin America.
We have been brought face to
face with the possibility that, with
the expressed German attitude
toward Latin America what it is,
the French possessions in this
hemisphere, and presumably those
of the Netherlands and Denmark
as well. may. under the control of
German-directed puppet govern
ments in the home states, become
centers of Nazi influence and in
trigue in the New World—to say
nothing of becoming naval and air
bases. And this may be done with
out any change of flag or transfer
of sovereignty: without, that is any
outward violation of the Monroe
Doctrine.
We have seen, from French state
ments. that the Germans never
once abandoned their pressure to
obtain control of the French fleet,
despite their promises and assur
ances that it would not be used
against Great Britain in this war.
Taking those promises at face value,
for what purpose was it intended
that it should be used?
Inescapable Conclusions.
Conning over these lessons, adding
them to what we know of our own
military position, we come to cer
tain inescapable conclusions.
One is that the real stake in
this war is the command of the
maritime communications of the
Atlantic Ocean. That command
rests still in British hands, thanks
to the vigorous action of the Brit
ish government. But it will do so
only as long as the British fleet
continues to exist, as long as it
still has bases adequate to its opera
tion and maintenance, and as long
as Britain is able to maintain that
freedom of action which is In
dispensable to the free employment
of sea power.
But we must also recognize that
command of the Atlantic Ocean is
vital to our own security. We can
exercise that command ourselves
as against the present combined
fleets of the axis: we cannot exer
cise it as against the fleets the axis
will have next year, plus the Brit
ish fleet. We cannot build or ac
quire from any source, in time, the
warships needed for this purpose.
It is, therefore, necessary for us to
maintain the British fleet in being—
if we can.
More, it is also necessary for us
to see to it that the control of that
fleet does not pass into hands which
may be hostile to us—if we can.
Question Is Risk.
These propositions are self-evi
dent. They scarcely require argu
ment. The question to be weighed
is whether we can do anything ef
fective to contribute to this neces
sary end without taking risks which
are unjustified by the hope of suc
cess.
Remember that we take risks any
way. If we do nothing, we take
the risk that the British fleet, in
the hands of a Nazified British
government under control of a ruth
less German master, or in the hands
of German officers and men, may
be employed to further German am
bitions in the New World which will
bring us Into deadly danger. This
1
risk we must weigh against the risks
we take if we now try to prevent
such a thing from happening. It
can be prevented from happening
only by prolonging the powers of
British resistance, either in the
British Isles, or if that be impos
sible in the end. then in the domin
ions and colonies of the Empire.
While this resistance continues,
xve purchase time to continue with
the scarcely begun labors of com
pleting our own defenses. When
this resistance ends, we must face
alone whatever may betide. In the
| face of existing facts, in the face of
no more than the past week's les
sons, we had better have done with
| all contentions of the “we-can-get
along-with-Hitler” order. We have
seen the end to which appeasers
I come. We can get along with a vic
' torious Hitler only under conditions
where we can oppose his force with
superior force. That means first of
all sea power. We come back to the
facts of the situation —we come
back to the British fleet.
But what can we do to prolong
British resistance?
First of all. we can give the Brit
! ish people hope. It was the death
of hope which was the death of
the French republic. If we do noth
i ing, the British will fight, but they
I will fight as men fight who see no
use in fighting save to sell their
lives dearly as they may. This is
the greatest and most far-reaching
aid we can afford the British.
Second, we can make available to
British warships the use of our
North Atlantic bases for mainte
nance and repair, now that their
own are so severely threatened.
Can Aid Evacuation.
Third, we can organize on a grand
scale efforts to evacuate the chil
dren and some of the women of the
British Isles, presuming that British
resistance continues long enough to
enable these plans to become effec
tive.
Fourth, we can increase in all
categories not impairing our own
defense, and without the present
restrictions of the Neutrality Act,
our material aid to Britain.
Fifth, we can now make such
agreements as shall assure the safety
of the British dominions and colo
nies by American-British naval co
operation in the event of the forced
evacuation by the British fleet of
its home bases. This would involve
our agreeing not to permit the Ger
mans access to American foodstuffs
and supplies as long as they were
fighting Britain. It would require
the support of our Latin-American
neighbors, and the assured com
mand of the Atlantic Ocean.
Sixth, we can now take such steps
as shall assure us of having fully
manned, equipped and defended
bases to make this policy good—
in Greenland. Newfoundland, Ber
muda, Trinidad, the Azores and on
the west coast of Africa. This, too,
requires agreement with Britain as
to the future defense of these locali
ties.
Seventh, we can, in agreement
with Australia and New Zealand,
take such steps for the maintenance
of the status quo in the Western
TRAVEL.
7-DAY TOUR OF
Special race includes
rail fare and lower berth
to Mont Joli, Que., and
Mass Trip Iran return. Also all expenses,
Wasklagtaa including hotels and
$120.80 meals, on a four-day
Iraai (altlnara 550-mile trip in modern,
5-passenger motor cars to Perce, Baie des
Chaleurs, beautiful Matapedia Valley.
Completely encircling the famed Gaspl
Peninsula.
Ask for illustrated booklet — also in
quire about all-expense tours of the
Saguenay and lower St. Lawrence. No
passports required.
A. P. LAIT,. Telephone NAtioasl 33)3
922 15th St., N. W„ Washington, D. C.
1_1^
i
Pacific as may be possible in view
of our Atlantic situation.
Eighth, we must meanwhile build
our own defenses as energetically
as we possibly can.
Ninth, we might well consider at
this time the advisibility of break
ing off diplomatic relations with
Germany. This would not only sym
bolize our attitude, but it would put
us in a position to urge our Latin
American neighbors to do likewise;
thus enabling us to rid ourselves
of the focal points of intrigue and
subversive activity which are now
operative in every Nazi and Fascist
Embassy, Legation and consulate to
the south of the Rio Grande. These
activities would continue under
ground. no doubt; but on that basis
they can be dealt with in other
fashions than are permissible with
diplomatic agencies. As an example
of what is meant, it is reported
from Mexico City that the German
Legation in Guatemala hands out
every day some 10.000 copies of
a “news bulletin" praising Germany
and Italy and attacking not only
Britain, but the United States. This
sort of thing is becoming intolerable.
Must Weigh Powers.
Of course, in all that we do, wc
must weigh our * powers and our
limitations. We ought not to sound
trumpets or fling banners to the
breeze. We cannot plunge headlong
into a desperate attempt to drive
the Germans out of Britain, if they
get in. We do not have the power
to do so, and we ought not to waste
our strength in attempting the im
possible. Restraint limited objectives,
the taking of well calculated risics;
a policy firm in principle, cautious
is the plan but bold in executions
—and a clear sense of the value
of time: These are requisites.
Some of the acts above suggested
may, in the legal sense, be con
sidered acts of war. They will cer
tainly be acts highly irritating to
Germany. But the time has come
to realize that appeasing conquerors,
or shrinking from the mere sound
of the word “war,” is no assurance
of safety. Indeed, it is an invitation
to attack. Legalistic interpretations
of belligerence and neutrality are
outworn Actions of a day that is
dead and gone. What is required of
the American people, and their
leaders, in this hour of crisis is a
realistic facing of unpleasant facts !
and the adoption of a national
policy which will assure the safety !
of the Republic.
There can no longer be any doubt
in any thinking citizen's mind of
the reality of the danger, or the
character of the threat with which
we have to deal. But we ought to
remember that the resources of Nazi
Germany are not inexhaustible; that
famine will gnaw at Europe's vitals
this coming winter; that Hitler has
not acquired access to any source of
petroleum which can really take care
of his requirements, and that his
bid for world empire, like those of
Philip II, Louis XIV. Napoleon and
Wilhelm II before him. can be
strangled by sea powe’ in the end—
provided sea power is given time to
do its slow but inexorable work.
British Shirked Duty.
It is not our duty to preserve the
balance of power in Europe. His
torically, that is the task of Britain.
Successive British governments have
shirked this duty; a generation of
British people have refused to bear
the burdens of armament. Admit
all this—and yet we are today faced
with a situation which, while not
wholly of our making, must, never
theless. be dealt with not on the basis
RESORTS.
MACANIE, VA.
Cbatei
COM- r~—'--'FOR A REAL
f£fT‘ ''if ENJOYABIE
•LZZt'S'&t MOUNTAIN
SOOD ROADS, VACATION
plan
tSi **** DAY
FOR cm Tiro' WNlw $ IS" A NECK
.1,fPiDiR PLENTY OF
.t*HAfil>'80"t'a '.FINEST EOOD
SKY CHALET ■ MACAN1E.VA.
' VIRGINIA BEACp, VA.
of wishful thinking and idle recrim
ination, but on the basis of self-pres
ervation in the face of deadly danger.
War is a terrible thing to have to
contemplate, but defeat in war—
especially in modern war—is worse.
Our sole concern should *be with
our own future. This future is
bound up, in a world ruled by force,
with maintenance of the command
of the seas by which, and only by
which, danger may come to us or
our neighbors. Such measures as we
can take to this end ought to be
tpken, must be taken. These are not
only material matters; they extend
also into the realm of the spirit and
the will. We have the power to
save ourselves if only we can make
up our minds in time and act accord
ingly. If we sit idly taking counsel
of our fears, we shall have to pay
the price that others have paid who
cried peace, peace, when there was
no peace.
iCopyrlght. 1W40, by New York Tribune, Inc.)
384 Volunteer Workers
Join Willkie Forces
There are more than six times
as many registered volunteer work
ers at the Willkie-McNary head
quarters of the Republican State
Committee of the District of Co
lumbia at the end of the first week
of the campaign than there were in
1936 for the Landon-Knox drive,
Mrs. Louise Hunter Snow, secre
tary, said yesterday
Since July 1. when temporary
headquarters were established at
1331 G street N W„ 384 volunteer
workers have registered. Sixty vol
unteer workers were registered at
the end of the first week in 1936.
"These 384 volunteers have been
interviewed during the week and
have been classified ar to qualifi
cations," Mrs. Snow said. “We hope
that we will be equally successful
next week, as a great many more
are needed.”
The committee is selecting perma
nent campaign headquarters cen
trally located in downtown Wash
ington^
RESORTS.
VIRGINIA.
SHENANDOAH
Alum Springs Hotel
n miles east Orkney Springs. High In
the Allegheny Mountains. RIDING.
SWIMMING TENNIS. DANCING. SOFT
BALL MOUNTAIN CLIMBING. GOLF
COURSE AVAILABLE Never a dull mo
ment. Scenic roads to historic spots.
A Vacation That Will Do You
Good
Invigorating mountain air. Health-giv
ing waters. Delicious home cooked
food. FRIED CHICKEN. OLD VIR
GINIA HAM. FRESH GARDEN VEGE
TABLES. All outside rooms Inner
spring mattresses on all beds Blankets
needed every night. Private baths or
running water in every room. Spacious
porches. Weekly rates, ?|5 up. week
end S.1.50 up Will meet busses. Re
stricted Write for booklet.
Mr. dt Mrt. Rote, Bird Haven, Va.
OLD POINT COMFORT, VA.
[
3 VACATIONS IN ONEI
Room, bath,
meals & g,olf ]or "*•*
Enjoy a cool dip in an outdoor
pool; dancing on the Marine
Roof overlooking water. iNo
cover charge.) Excellent aolf
course. Nearby places of his
toric interest: Williamsburg,
Yorktown, Jamestown. Take
the night boat, train or drive.
Enjoy this vacation value.
Write for reservations —NOW.
The CHAMBERLIN
1 Old Point Comfort, Virginia
V SIDNEY BANKS. PretMent #
RALPH J. HEWLETT. Mgr. f
VIRGINIA ^EACHTva;
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Roland Eaton, Maa^grag Poetise
3Frattrifl i&ufftn 5fntrl
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Reasonable Rates, Excellent Food.
New Simmons Innerspring Mattresses.
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THE BEACHOME
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HOTEL COMPLETELY FURNISHED—
AVAILABLE BY DAY. WEEK. MONTH,
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L. T. ROWLAND, Be«l<lent jttMjW
FITZHUGH °~r*£Tl\.
Reasonable Rates—Southern Cooking
Complete!., remodeled. Prlrete both*.
Mr,. Marr S. Payne, Mrs. W. P. Glorer
_Phone Va. Beaeh A93_
HOTEL NEWCASTLE £££%.,
On Oomi Front it ltth St. Booklet.
1
New Waverley Hotel
Virginia Beach, Va.
Finest surf bathing, golf, tennis,
riding, all sports
Ocean Front—Every Convenience j
Private Bathe
BOOKLET B.
MRS. B. G. PORTER, Mgr.
VIRGINIA BEACH. VA.
On the Ocean Front.
All sports. Modern. Enlarged and re
decorated throughout. 52 cool, comfortable
room.' Excellent meals. Reasonable rate*. I
American plan. For rate*, ante
Mlae Virginia Leggett. Mgr. 1
1
'Pro-American' Wing
Of Youth Congress
Plans Rival Setup
Gene Tunney Backs
Delegates Denied
Convention Seats
By the Aaeoclated Presi.
LAKE GENEVA, Wis , July 6 —
“Pro-American” delegates to the
American Youth Congress, denied
seats for “technical reasons,” head
ed home tonight after announcing
plans for a new youth organization
in Michigan as a step toward a na
tional “anti-Communist” group.
Their sponsor, former Heavy
weight Boxing Champion Gene Tun
ney, left for New York with a part
ing shot:
“The American Youth Congress
doesn’t really represent youth. It’s
a lot of labels, and one of its biggest
labels is the Young Communists.”
Congress Proceeds.
Meanwhile the Youth Congress
proceeded with routine business ses
sions and a discussion of its by
laws and constitution. Election of
officers was scheduled for tomorrow.
Bruce McKay of Detroit said the
“pro-Americans” would set up a
Michigan State council “within 60
days” composed of members of Jun
ior Chambers of Commerce, Chris
tian Endeavor, De Molay, Young
Democrats and Republicans and
similar groups.
McKay said Michigan was chosen
because a large majority of the
“Tunney bloc” was from that State.
Other States would be invited to
Join them later, he said.
Michigan Leaders.
The Michigan State council will
be headed by Henry G. Groehn and
Edward Church, both of Detroit, and
chairmen, respectively, of the Young
Republicans and Young Democrats
there.
Tunney told the group he would
go to Detroit to aid in the organiza
tion of the new group "if they want
my help.”
Last night the Youth Congress
voted to contribute "our energies,
our services, and if need be our
lives, to the great task of defend
ing our country and our democratic
rights against any attack of ene
mies from without and against any
betrayal from within.”
Tunney Attacks Reds.
On his arrival in New York by
plane, Mr. Tunney said the Youth
1 Congress was a “Communist group,
financed by the Communist partv
and in direct contact with, and
taking orders from Moscow."
"Personally.” he said. “I don't
think that too many pressure groups
are too good. Democracy has been
run by and for pressure groups, and
maybe we'd better start getting a
pressure group of American citizens
for a change."
The Youth Congress, he continued,
was "completely discredited, particu
larly on their vote to refuse to help
Britain in its fight against Nazi-ism.
and also on their stand against
compulsory military training.”
Mr. Tunney said he refused an
RESORTS.
OCEAN CITY, MD.
There’s TUN for the ENTIRE
family during the delightful
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7 \ Write Chamber,
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Ocean City's Largest, Finest
The George Washington is Ocean
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APARTMENTS
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A hotel of distinction and refinement,
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Season. June itth-Bept. loth, _
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HASTINGS HOTEL PrivateTaTh's'.
Parking Space, modern, homelike, reason
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MAYFLOWER ORBA
pointed. CiiuitT 200. Owner-Management.
THE DEL-MAR “ks
Private Batha. MBS. B. L CABZT.
i
Invitation to address the congress
because the “pro-American” bloc
was unable to seat its delegates. He
added: "They have heckled better
men than me, including the Presi
dent.”
Youth Congress Rapped
By Catholic Students
NEW YORK, July 6 (*>).—'The
Newman Club Federation, repre
senting 50,000 Catholic college stu
dents and alumni, today voted at
its silver jubilee conference con
demnation of “the irreligious and
subversive tendencies of the Amer
ican Youth Congress.”
William J. Hurley of New York,
the federation’s new president, said
his group believed the Youth Con
gress was “under the control of
forces which are so un-American
that they openly follow the Moscow
party lines.”
Washington and Manhattan
To Start 2-Coast Cruises
NEW YORK, July 6.—The 33,000
ton American luxury liners Manhat
tan and Washington will Inaugurate
a regular cruise between the East
and West coasts this month, accord
ing to an announcement by P. V. G.
Mitchell, vice president of the United
States Lines.
The new service to Los Angeles
and San Francisco via Havana, Pan
ama Canal and Acapulco, Mexico,
Mr. Mitchell said, Is designed to pro
vide an all-American voyage at a
time when the war in Europe has
shut off so many parts of the world
to pleasure travel. It Is to be In
augurated on July 26 with the de
parture of the Washington from
New York. The Manhattan will fol
low on August 9, and regular sail
ings are scheduled throughout the
summer, fall and winter.
The itinerary of the 11,000-mile
voyage has been specially designed
to give passengers a worthwhile stay
in each port of call, a full program
of shore excursions and overnight
stays In Havana and Balboa. The
line will also arrange combination
"circle tours” of the United States
and Mexico by rail or air and water
in connection with the calls at Aca
pulco and California ports.
Much of this voyage, the an
nouncement pointed out, is within
sight of the American coast or
within a few miles of it, yet the
* RESORTS.
j_BRADDOCK HEIGHTS. MD.
I Camp Schley Inn
Fairmont Cottage
Washington Cottage
Now Open—All Under Manirrmenl of
Mis« Clara E. Coblentx.
Write or phone for reservations and rate#—
Braddock Heights 253 J
Special Sunday Dinner, $1.00
Plate Dinner, 75c
VINDOBONA HOTEL
BRADDOCK HEIGHTS, MD.
Phone Braddock Heights 2601
A modern mountain reaort hotel on
ton of Catoetin Ranxe. AS room*,
beautifully furnished. Excellent food
and service. Weekly rates upon reoueat.
M. 1. Crorhan. Manaxement.
COBLENTZ
MOUNTAIN HOUSE
(Formerly Searhrist Mountain House)
NEWLY FURNISHED
MRS. H. B. COBLENTZ
Phone Braddock Hts. 2501
_MASSACHUSETTS]
★ The COFFEE HOUSE
Cape Cod, Hvannis. Mass.
Known for many years for fine food,
modern accommodations. Near Crali;
ville Beach. Our own orchestra, dancln*
every evenln*. Tennis eourta on prem
ises Reasonable rates. _
★ WELLSMERE INN on Cape Cod.
Warm sea bathinr: private beach ad
joininx. Excellent accommodations
and table. All snorts. Restricted
_clientele._Falmouth Heights. Masa
_CAPE COD. MASS.
COM* TO CHASMIMO CupO Cod
0V5TER
HARBORS
HUB
Your private "plaaiaro island,"
with causeway to mainland — 2'/i
hoars from Boston. Recreation
and relaxation. Donald Ross golf
cosrso, S En-Toat-Cas groon tennis
courts, swimming (70® water),
pine-sheltered beach — all at Club
door. Riding, yachting, bloe-«sh
•»g. Social references regoested.
C. W. Wennop, M»r„ Ostarviffg, Mass.
NAHANT, MASS.
HOTEL TUDOR
NAHANT, MASS.
Beautifully located. Directly on the
ocean, with its ever-changing marine
view. Comfortable accommodations and
excellent meals. Oarage and golf near
by. Surf bathing, yachting. Ashing, etc.
54th Reason—Tel. Nahant 195
ALEXANDRA CATTO, Proprietor
cruises offer an opportunity to see
three foreign countries as well as
the engineering marvel of the Pan
ama Canal. Passengers will not be
required to have passports or visas
to enter any of these countries.
The Washington and Manhattan
will carry two classes of passengers—
first class and tourist cabin. A 10
per cent reduction will be allowed
on the round trip by sea.
_ TRAVEL.
INCUIDI A •lAUTIFUl
Great Lakes Cruise
AMO TML
Canadian Rockies
Off
PACIFIC COAST TRIPS
• Gotng or returning, gdd variety to your
Pacific Coast trip by including the
Canadian Rockies and tbs cool Great
Lakes cruise. Sailings twice weekly from
Pert McNiooll. Sault Ste. Mane. Port
Arthur and Fort William . . . east and
westbound See beautiful Georgian Bay,
Thunder Bay. Enjoy cool, refreshing
breesea. No hay fever. Fares are low. No
extra fare for pamengero holding first dais
tail tickets . . . small extra charge for
meals and berth.
id Yum Trmmt Ain* m
14th and New York Ave. N.W
Wash., D. C. Phone National *‘235
Gkxi&ic
WORLD’S ORCATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
RESORTS.
_NEW YORK.
20 MINUTES TO WOULD'* FAIH
H0TU BRETON HALL
Bcaa 4way at Mfh St., N. Y.
DOUBLE ROOM l BATH ^.50
Spactol Family Haiti
tatagt Mjauring • Subway at Daar
_SARANAC. N. Y.
mm INN
ON UPPER SARANAC lake
IN THE ADIRONDACK
GOLF • TENNIS • FISHING
All resort antertoinmont
ROOMS WITH MEALS FROM *7 DAILY
Co’togts completely furnished end serviced
by the hotel for rent by the week, menti
or season, with meols in the hotel.
SELECT CLIENTELE
Address Laurence A. Slaughter, Pres »
Saranac Inn, N. Y.
PEEKS KILL, N. Y. '
r999& wrSHAATQrte.fr
RjMARRwS
t<“ ClMNABAlCy
tiSwuu,*
2 Ruckti, 2 Lakes, 2.000 Acres h
w# TS Hertes, Real Wester* Tewe I
R«|wlar Overlaad Stage Service ■
W.t.r Wt,. Trim, P.ck Trl,., R.krM, I
D,fi,it,ly R.itrictd. Ilia.trai.d Soatil#, I
St. mu. mmi |
LAKE PLACID, N. Y.
Whiteface Inn L
IAKE PLACID ♦ NEW YORK
jQ Located directly on Lake
xj . Placid—one of the most
yfj \e. beautiful spots in the
"'ri Adirondack*, lg-hole
championship golf course at
door. Dancing, swimming, ten
ms, etc. Rooms with bath from
$7 daily including meals. Cot
tage*—housekeeping or with
full hotel service. Carefully
restricted clientele. Booklet.
Henry W. Haynes, Managing Director
Sp«ci«l July Rate,
N.Y. OFFICE, 75 West St.
Is Wtntof Pnwou Huna, Daytons lawk. Hi.
LAKE GEORGE, N. Y.
THE FERN WOOD INN
Lake George. N. Y.
On Lake. Modern, homelike atmosphere,
line cuisine, private park, beach. Booklet.
' LONG ISLAND, N.Y.
•mSAVE TIME-SAVE HOMEYm
LM Sttor for Looo at
The WHITMAN
1l1itSLl.lMAw.,lHMica. Ll. 47C
Largo. oirtoido rooms, 2 twdoors. $ I «&d
hot*. tmb S Ownr. Coftno Shop. X «*
Main Dining Room. Rorfdng apoco. ~ nr
12 MINUTES from WORLD'S F«Tr™
■■■■ Bus Stops at Hatot ■■■■■
BLUE RIDGeTnTc
HERE'S THE UNUSUAL VACATION
FROM $2 A DAY UP
at Cool, Picturesque Blue Ridge Y. M.
Y. W. C. A. Graduate College
(near Asheville. N. C.)
Art. music, drama courses under instructors
from leading institutions, including famous
Carolina Playmakers’ Workshop. Swimming,
boatmg. horseback riding nature Jaunts,
tennis, etc. Full particulars: Mrs. Louise
Proctor Engle, 1521 No. Abingdon gt.,
Arlington. Va. CH. 3553.
NORTH CAROLINA. NORTH CAROLINA.
NORTH CAROLINA
where Mature planned
Your most thrilling Vacation
BUurmgKtk
THRILL to scenery unequalled in
Eastern America. Thrill to fishing
which sportsmen say and records prove
among the best found anywhere...
Rainbow Trout, Black Bass, Muskel
lunge...inlet and deep sea fishing.Thrill
to a cool exhilarating climate* that lends
added enjoyment to... golf, swimming,
Doating, horseback riding, hiking,
motoring. Thrill to the charming
people and new <™,-.c—..**
adventures you riltAtm?ltCon,eTttttion and
will find in North
Carolina. Come "M»T«CMiuii,minsMClTiimmir’
now, the season --
is at its height.
i i

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