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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 07, 1940, Image 18

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30 of 36 Traffic Deaths at 1940 Halfway Mark Are Pedestrians
Fatalities Are Five Below
Same Period of 1939;
Safety Education Pushed
Fifty Per Cent of Walkers Killed Found
To Have Violated Protective Rules
All statistics used by The Star concerning both. 1939 and 1940
accidents are based on facts gathered by reporters covering coroner's
inguests to prepare the series "Why Must They Die?"
By J. B. ZATMAN.
Carelessness of the pedestrian continued to play a major part in
District traffic fatalities as Washington piled up 36 traffic deaths during
the first six months of 1940. as compared with 41 recorded during the same
period last year.
Although this represents a 12 per cent decrease, analysis reveals that
almost half the number killed thus far this year would probably be alive
today if they had obeyed rules intended for their safety.
Thirty pedestrians were included in the 36 traffic fatalities from
January through June of this year and of these 20 have been definitely
found by coroner's juries to have been responsible for their own deaths.
Of this latter number. 13 crossed a street not at the crosswalk and three
crossed against a red light. In two of the cases of crossing not on
a crosswalk, however, the driver was deemed sufficiently responsible to
be held for official action.
At this time last year. 32 pedestrians had been killed with 23 of this
number violating an essential safety rule by crossing not on a crosswalk
or crossing against a red light.
Pedestrian Education Progress.
Some progress in educating the pedestrian to cross the street only
on a crosswalk has been made, nevertheless, it may be noted in com
paring the three-month period beginning April, 1940. with the same period
last year. Only five pedestrians were killed while crossing the street
not on a crosswalk during the second quarter of this year, while nine
met their deaths in committing a similar act during the second quarter
of 1939.
The fact that age is an important factor in traffic fatalities is shown
In the large proportion of pedestrians 60 years of age and over involved
in fatal accidents—13 of the 30 pedestrians killed during the first half of
1940. This compares witn 17, or 53 per cent, of the 32 pedestrians killed
during the first half of 1939 who fell in the 60-year-old-or-over class.
Here. too. there is a sizable decrease during the second quarter of
1940 in the number of aged persons involved in fatal accidents as com
pared with the second quarter of last year—four from April through
June of this year and nine in a similar period in 1939.
Of the 13 pedestrians 60 years of age who were killed from January
through June of this year. 6 crossed not on a crosswalk, 4 crossed on a
crosswalk, 2 crossed against a red light and 1 was standing in the gutter
when struck.
Eight of the 17 60-year-old-or-over pedestrians killed during a similar
period in 1939 crossed not on a crosswalk. 5 crossed against a red light
and 4 crossed on a crosswalk.
In an effort to cut to a minimum all jaywalking, the Police De
■ partment has equipped a scout car with special loudspeaking equipment
designed to educate the general public against risking their lives by
stepping from the curb in the middle of the block.
Help of Public Is Requested.
"While we realize that this dangerous habit can not be wiped out
entirely," Maj. Ernest W. Brown, superintendent of police, said yesterday,
"we hope that more and more people will begin to give more thought
to the safety of their actions before they cross the street."
He asked any one knowing of a location where jaywalking is par
ticularly prevalent to notify the Police Department so that this scout car
can place that area on its schedule for a visit soon.
Although no children were killed in traffic accidents during the first
three months of 1940. three were crushed to death by motor vehicles
during the following three months, making a total of three for the six
month period ending June 30. This compares favorably with seven chil
dren killed during a similar period last year.
A downward trend in injuries, both to pedestrians and to motorists,
accompanied the drop in fatalities for the first half of 1940. Only 748
pedestrians were injured during the first half of this year as compared
with 971 hurt during a similar period in 1939, while the motorists injured
during these two periods numbered 822 and 858 for 1940 and 193S. re
spectively.
Of the total number of injuries thus far this year. 345 have been
Children under 14. This represents a drop from 368 in 1939. Traffic
Director William A. Van Duzer attributed the improved record to an
"increased awareness on the part of the public to the accident problem"
and to the "constant hammering by newspapers and radio stations on
aafety matters."
He warned, however, that the danger months are still ahead, point
ing out that child casualties are usually the bulk of summer accidents.
Safety Banners Being Displayed.
In this connection he said that banners cautioning children against
playing in the streets and disobeying traffic regulations had been placed
in public places throughout the city. These banners point to the |act
that “each summer hospitals care for more than 200 students injured
in traffic accidents.”
“We also intend to have about 200 signs made warning the public
against ‘Highway Enemy No. 1—the stop-sign passer.’” Mr. Van Duzer
explained. He said these will lie placed in gasoline stations next week.
The other side of the sign, he said, will have printed on it, “School's out,
watch out—when you walk, when you drive, stay alive.”
Men far surpassed women as traffic fatalities during the first half
of 1940. with 32 of the male sex killed as compared with four of the
opposite sex. Of the 32, 3 were children, 1 was a motorcycle policeman.
1 was a passenger on a truck, 1 w?as a motorist and the rest ^ere
pedestrians. Three of the four women killed in traffic were pedestrians
and the fourth was a passenger in a car.
In the same period last year 26 men. 8 women and 7 children met
their deaths in traffic. Of the 26 men, 2 were motorists. 1 was a
bicyclist, 1 was a truck driver. 1 was operating a motorcycle, 1 was a
passenger in a car, 1 was riding on the fender of a truck and the
remainder were pedestrians. All eight women killed were pedestrians
and one of the seven child fatalities was riding on a bicycle at the time of
the accident.
The one case of negligent homicide pending for Police Court action
at the close of 1939 was nolle prossed by the District attorney's office.
Death Drivers' Experience
Number of Operators.
First half First half
Bhroerience. 1940. 1939.
19 days.-. 1 0
4 months..- 1 0
8 months ... 1 0
1 year...0 0
2 years.— 1 3
3 years.-. 2 2
4 years.-. 1 3
8 years. 3 2
6 years. 1 1
7 years. 1 0
8 years. 1 1
9 years. 0 1
10 years. 2 3
13 years. 2 0
14 years. 0 2
15 years. 2 6
16 years. 1 0
17 years -- 0 5
18 years. 2 1
20 years .. 3 4
22 years. 1 1
26 years.. 2 0
30 years. 1 0
No driver's permit_ 0 1
Hit and run—unappre
hended . 1 3
Experience not given.. 4 1
No driver, vehicle,
horse-drawn _ 1 0
Official investigation— *
Incomplete _ 1 0
Age of Victims
First, First
half half
1940. 1939
Under 10. 2 2
10-20 . 1 5
20-30 . 5 2
30-34 ..1 2
35-44 . 3 6
45-54 . 5 4
55-64 . 8 5
65-74 .. 7 7
75 and over_2 8
Age not given -. 1 0
Official investigation In
complete . 1 0
Traffic Killers
First, half First half
1940. 1939.
Pleasure cars. 18 22
Trucks .. 7 8
Street cars. 5 4
Taxicabs _ 2 1
Motorcycles . 1 1
Circus wagon_ 1 0
Army caisson .. 1 0
Hit and run, type of
vehicle unknown ... 0 3
Buses _ 0 2
Official investigation
incomplete . 1 0
It’s dangerous to expect the other
; fellow to use all the caution.
Official Action in Fatalities
A tabulation of legal action taken in 1940 traffic deaths up
to June 30 follows:
Cases in which the death-car driver was absolved of blame by
a coroner's jury_ 25
Cases in which coroner's jury held driver for Police Court action
under Negligent Homicide Act___ 5
(One case was nolle prossed bv the District attorney's office
and four cases are still pending for Police Court action.)
Cases in which a coroner's jury held driver of death car for action
by the grand jury.... 5
(One of these was a hit-and-run driver, whose identity is
unknowm, but who will be held for grand jury action when cap
tured by police. Two cases were ignored by the grand Jury and
two are still pending for grand jury action.)
i k
MUST PEDESTRIAN PROTECTION TAKE THE GUISE OF FORTIFICATIONS?
With 13 of the 30 pedestrian fatalities in traffic
during the first half of 1940 occurring in the middle of
the block, despairing traffic observers may well ask if
some sort of curbstone fortifications would not be in
I order to prevent pedestrians from needlessly sacrificing
i life or limb.
The drawing above by Star Staff Artist Newman Sud
i duth portrays how one Washington intersection might
look if fortified against the menace which pedestrians
seem unable to combat on their own initiative. Fif
teenth street and New York avenue N.W. is portrayed
with concrete walls erected along the sidewalks, leaving
only controlled crosswalks open to pedestrians seeking
to venture across the street.
The idea behind the drawing is fantasy, but not so
unreasonable as might be thought at first consideration.
Washington traffic experts have noted that during heavy
winters, when the snow on the streets is piled high along
the curbs except at crosswalks, that pedestrian traffic
fatalities take a sharp drop. Unable to cross where the
whim strikes them because of walls of snow, pedestrians
inadvertently take the protected course at the inter
section.
Of the more than 12,000 pedestrian casualties in the
entire United States during 1939, records show that 41
per cent of those killed were violating a safety rule by
crossing between intersections or stepping into the street
from between or in front of parked cars. Small wonder
the pedestrian has been called ‘‘the Vanishing American.”
Hour of Fatalities
Plrst half First half
AM— 19*0. 1939.
Midnight-1 . 1 1
1- 2 . 1 n
2- 3 .. 3 0
3- 4 . 0 0
4- 5 .• 1 1
5- fi .._. 0 0
6- 7 . 2 2
7- 8 . 0 1
8- 9 . 2 1
9- 10 . 2 2
10- 11 . 0 1
11-12 . 0 1
PM —
Noon-1 . 2 0
1-2 __. 2 0
2- 3 . 0 2
3- 4 .;. 1 3
4- 5 .. 4 1
5- 6 . 0 2
6- 7 . 1 4
7- 8 . 5 4
8- 9 . 2 6
9- 10 . 3 5
10- 11.2 3
11- 12 ... .. 1 0
Official investigation
incomplete .__ 1 0
Hit-and-run accident,
time unknown_ 0 1
Death Weather
Condition. First half First half
1840. 1P38.
Clear—Day..14 13
Clear—Night ....11 14
i Raining—Night 4 11
Foggy or*misty—Night 3 1
Raining—Day _ 1 1
Ice-covered streets—
Day . .... 1 1
Ice-covered streets—
Nights_ 1 0
Official investigation
incomplete . 1 0
Sex of Death Car Drivers
First First
half half
1P40. 1838.
Male . 32 37
Female ..t.. I 1
No driver, vehicle horse
drawn _ 10
Hit and run. sex unknown 1 3
Official investigation in
complete ... 1 0
Auto Leaves Road
And Soars 72 Feet
By the Associated Press.
LUSK, Wyo.—A car failed to turn
when the road did. Harry Miller,
highway patrolman, said by actual
measurement the wheels didn't
touch the ground for 72 feet after it
left the road.
The car rolled over several times
and landed right side up 390 feet
away. The driver still could gfin
and had no serious injuries.
Travel Incompleted Road
Auto tourists are using the incom
pleted Inter-American highway be
tween Guatemala and the United
States, shipping their cars by rail
over the sections where the highway
has not been completed.
The ratio of deaths to fatal acci
dents where a passenger car and
truck are involved is nine per cent
greater than when one passenger
car collides with another or with
a fixed object
i
Traffic Death Chronology for 1940's First Half
JANUARY.
1. Robert W. Davis. 36. of 334
Thirty-fourth street N.E., a motor
cycle policeman, about 3 p.m. Janu
ary 1. was in collision with an auto
mobile in the 2400 block of Good
Hope road S.E. while pursuing a'
speeding car. Weather clear. Driver
of automobile. 19 with three years'
experience, exonerated by coroner's
jury.
2. Hezekiah McCauley. 64. of 1419
Clifton street N.W., at 8:15 pm.
January 1. struck by automobile
while crossing Thirteenth street
near Clifton street N.W. about 10
feet below the crosswalk. Weather
clear. Driver. 33. with 18 years’ ex
perience. released by coroner's jury.
3. Hugh D. Cooke, 52, of 208
Massachusetts avenue N.E.. at 12:10
am. January 12. stepped into side
of car while attempting to cross
Eighth street S.E. near M street
in the middle of the block. Weather
cloudy, street wet. Driver. 44. with
more than 20 years’ experience, re
leased by coroner's jury, but fined in
Police Court for operating an auto
mobile with expired permit.
4. Mrs. Mary E. Hall. 72. of 1525
Half street S.W.. at 6:05 p.m. Janu
ary 13. struck by automobile while
crossing Fourth street S.E. between
L and M streets in the middle of the
block. Weather foggy and raining.
Driver, 33. with eight years' experi
ence. exonerated by coroner’s jury.
5. William Penner, 70. of 1048 Jef
ferson street N.W., at 12:05 p.m.
January 10. struck by automobile
passing to the left of a street-car
loading platform as he walked across
Pennsylvania avenue at Twenty
fifth street N.W. in the crosswaik.
Weather clear. Driver. 49. with 27
years’ experience, held by coroner's
jury for Police Court action under
Negligent Homicide Act. The case
was nolle prossed in Police Court.
FEBRUARY.
6. Taft Jack Mov. 28. colored, of
the 400 block of L street S.E., about
2:25 a.m. February 11, struck by
taxicab while crossing Eleventh
street S.E. about 40 feet south of
intersection with M street. Weather
misty, had been raining. Victim had
been drinking. Driver, 24, with five
gears’ experience, who also had
been drinking, held by coroner's jury
for grand jury action. The case was
ignored by the grand jury.
7. James H. Jones, 60. of 634 New
York avenue N.W., about 9:50 p.m.
February 10. struck by hit-and-run
truck driver while crossing Ninth
street at M street N.W. in the cross
walk. Weather misty. Driver as yet
unapprehended. Will be taken be
fore grand jury on charge of man
slaughter when captured.
8. James B. Ritter. 70. of 210 F
street N.W., about 12:05 p.m. Feb
ruary 19. walked into side of street
car while crossing G street between
Second and Third streets^ N.W. in
the middle of the block. Had been
drinking. Raining heavily. Motor
man, 25. with 19 days’ experience,
exonerated by coroner's jury.
9. William F. Stetson. 73, of 417
Massachusetts avenue N.W., about 7
p.m. February 18, was struck by a
taxicab while crossing Sixth street
at G street N.W, In the crosswalk
against a red light. Raining.
i
Driver. 47. with 20 years' experience,
released by coroner's jury.
10. James Powell, 22. colored, of
the 4700 block of Benning road N.E..
between 4:30 and 5 p.m. February
26. while driving a truck, was in
collision with an automobile at
Tenth and F streets N.E. Weather
dear. Driver. 23. with five years’
experience, held by coroner's jury
for Police Court action under Negli
gent Homicide Act. The case is still
pending in Police Court.
MARCH.
11. Heywood Hazard. 56. colored,
of 1511 Sixth street N.W. shortly
after 7 p.m. March 5. was struck by
an automobile while crossing O
street east of the crosswalk at Sixth
i street N.W. Weather clear. Driver
; 29. colored, with 13 years' experience,
who was proceeding on a green
j light, exonerated by coroner's jury.
12. Col. Frederic L. Huidekoper,
65, of 1868 Columbia road N.W.,
about 7 pm. March 3, struck by
| streetcar as he stepped from load
ing platform on Connecticut avenue
! immediately south of S street S.W.
directly in front of car. Weather
; cloudy: had been raining. Operator,
with six months’ experience, re
: leased by coroner's jury.
13. Sumerseth S. Robey. 70. of
1359Pennsylvania avenue S.E.
about 6:30 a m. March 12. struck by
! streetcar while attempting to cross
the streetcar track of Pennsyl
vania avenue approximately 30 feet
east of crosswalk at Thirteenth
street S.E. Weather clear. Motor
man, 42. with 16 years’ experience,
exonerated by coroner's jury.
14. George Winney. 93. of 638 Sec
ond street N.E.. about 1 p.m. Febru
ary 10. knocked down by a truck
backing away from a parked car
while standing in the gutter at a
I streetcar stop on H street N.E. im
mediately east of Second street.
Died March 13. Weather clear.
Driver, 25, with seven years’ experi
ence, released by coroner’s jury.
15. Jerry J. Hanagan. 37, of'9
Grant Circle, about 10:30 p.m. March
12, struck by automobile while
crossing Constitution avenue ap
proximately 190 feet east of Twelfth
street N.W. Weatfier clear. Driver,
43, with 22 years’ experience, held
by coroner's jury for Police Court
action uncjer Negligent Homicide
Act. The case is still pending in
Police Court.
16. Jeff Smith, 38. colored, 634 N
street N.W., about 4:40 p.m. March
19, while riding on the body of a
truck loaded with three heavy
spools of telephone cable, was
crushed to death beneath one of
the spools when the truck over
turned after making a sharp left
turn into Military road N.W. at
Connecticut avenue. Weather clear.
Driver, 46, colored, with 26 years’
experience, exonerated by coroner's
jury.
APRIL.
17. Olive May Crawford, colored,
35. of 1545 Fourth street N.W., about
7 p.m., April 12, struck by automobile
while crossing First street N.W. be
tween Seaton place and S street in
the middle of the block. Weather,
snow mixed with rain. Driver, 2&r
with four years’ driving experience,
exonerated by coroner’s jury.
i
MAY.
18 Mrs Ada Tait. 51. of 1320 Ran
dolph street N.W.. about 1 am.
March 31, injured when the car in
which she was riding crashed into
a pillar of the railroad viaduct at
Florida avenue and Third street N.E.
Died May 1. Weather, rainy. Driver,
53. with 30 years' driving experience,
released by coroner's jury.
19. Robert Fox. 48, of 6818 Pinev
Branch road N.W.. at 9:45 p.m.
March 21, was struck by automobile
while attempting to cross Seventh
street N.W. between R and S streets
in the middle of the block after step
ping into the street from between
parked cars. Died May 14. Weather,
clear. Driver, colored. 26. with three
years’ driving experience, exonerated
by coroner's jury.
20. Pvt. Michael Astore, 20. of
Fort Myer, Va., about 8 a.m. May 15.
was run over by an Army caisson
after he was knocked down when
attempting to stop stampeding
horses in the 2900 block of Bladens
burg road N.E. opposite the National
Training School for Boys. Weather,
clear. No inquest held—coroner is
sued a certificate of accidental
death.
21. Charles Richard Gray, jr.. 13,
of 3062 M street N.W., at 9 p m. May
18, struck by automobile while
standing in a button safety zone on
Pennsylvania avenue at Twenty
sixth street N.W. Weather, clear.
Driver 32. with 15 years’ driving ex
perience, held by coroner's jury for
Police Court action under Negligent
Homicide Act.
22. Christ Aravanis. 54, of 2133
Pennsylvania avenue N.W.. about 7
p.m. May 18. ran into side of car
w’hile attempting to cross Connecti
cut avenue about 21 feet north of
the crosswalk at N street N.W.
Weather, clear. Driver, 38. with six
years' driving experience, exonerated
by coroner’s jury.
23. George Rabins. 24, of Bayonne,
N. J„ about 2:45 a.m. May 19, was
crushed under the wheels of a circus
wagon when he fell after attempt
ing to jump up on the moving ve
hicle in the 3600 block of Benning
road N.E. Weather clear. No in
quest held—coroner issued a cer
tificate of accidental death.
24. Herman D. Bunch, 67, of 3220
Seventeenth street N.W.. about 2:15
a m. May 10, struck by truck while
crossing E street at Twelfth street
N.W. in the crosswalk. Weather,
clear. Driver, 23, with “considerable”
driving experience, held by coroner's
jury for grand jury action.
25. Vincent Bergin, 23, of 3218
Wisconsin avenue N.W., struck May
25. Official investigation of this case
is incomplete pending outcome of
injuries to Mrs. Bergin, who was
struck at the same time.
* JUNE.
26. Charles W. Arthur, 75,.of 1311
New Hampshire avenue N.W., at 9
p.m., June 3, struck by street car
while crossing Pennsylvania ave
nue, neab Twenty-first street N.W.,
not in the crosswalk. Weather
clear. Operator, 30, with four
months' experience as motorman,
exonerated by coroner's jury.
27. William P. Brown, colored. 7,
of 1807 Fifteenth street N.W.. about
1 pm.. June 6, was crushed beneath
the wheels of a dump truck In an
A
' alley in the rear of Fourteenth
street N.W.. between U and V
streets when he attempted to ••hitch"
a ride on the moving vehicle.
Weather clear. Driver, colored. 24.
with two years’ driving experience,
released by coroner's jury.
28. James Osborne Chisley. col
ored. 24. of 1233 Union Court S.W..
about 8:40 am.. June 7. fell be
neath the wheels of a District gov
ernment truck on which he had
been riding on Rittenhouse street,
between Thirty-third and Thirty
fourth streets N.W., when he
jumped off the moving vehicle to
recover his hat which had blown
off. Weather clear. Driver, 38,
with five years' driving experience.
No inquest held and coroner is
sued « verdict of accidental death.
29. An unidentified colored man.
about 9:30 p.m., June 8, ran in front
, of a street car on U street at Thir
| teenth street N.W, in fleeing with
a pocketbook he had snatched from
a pedestrian. Weather raining.
Street car operator. 56. whose driv- '
ing experience was not given. No
inquest held and coroner issued a
verdict of accidental death
30. Miss Victoria Kloepfer, 56, of
2800 Connect.cut avenue N.W.. about
4:20 p.m., June 11, ran into side
of automobile while attempting to
cross Connecticut avenue near Cal
| vert street, not in the crosswalk.
Weather clear. Driver. 51, with 18
years’ driving experience, released
by coroner's jury.
31. John J. Stahl. 63. of 194£ Bilt
more street N.W., about 6:50 am.,
June 13, struck by a motorcycle as
he was walking in the crosswalk
across Columbia'road at Eighteenth
street N.W. Weather clear. Driver,
33. with 20 years’ driving experi
ence. held by coroners jury for
Police Court action under the Neg
ligent Homicide Act.
32. Maj. Otto F. Engelmann. 60.
retired Army officer of 1308 Sheri
dan street N.W.. at 4:30 am.. June
15. killed when his car crashed into
a tree on Sixteenth street between
Taylor and Upshur streets N.W.
Driving experience could not be ob
Ages of Death Car Drivers
First half First half
19*0 1939.
Under 20_ 1 1
20-30 . 12 10
30-34 . 4 10
35-44 . 8 11
45-54 . 5 5
55-64 _ 2 1
Hit and run—age un
known 1 3
Vehicle drawn by hores 1 0
Age not given _ 1 0
Official investigation
incomplete _ 1 0
'Two drivers in the first half of
1940 drinking prior to accident.)
tained. Weather clear, daylight.
No inquest held and coroner issued
a verdict of accidental death.
33. Robert Lovings. colored, 49,
of 320 Sixon street S.W., at 11:15
p.m., June 15. struck by hit-and
run car while crossing Fourth
street in the crosswalk at I street
S.W. Weather clear. Driver, 35,
colored, with 10 years’ driving ex
perience, held by coroner's jury for
grand jury action.
34. Ralph Piperno. 60, of 208
Maryland avenue N.W.. about 10:40
p.m., June 16. struck by automo
bile while crossing North Carolina
avenue at Pennsylvania avenue
S.E. against a red light. Weather
clear. Driver, 39, with 15 years’
driving experience, exonerated by
coroner's jury.
35. Joseph Nappo, 59, of 1250
Tenth street N.W.. at 4:10 pm.
June 22, struck by automobile while
crossing M street at Ninth street
N.W. in the crosswalk. Weather
clear. Driver, 26, with 10 years'
driving experience, who was charged
with having been under the in
fluence of liquor at the time of the
accident, held by coroner's jury for
grand jury action.
36. Lawrence H. Honesty, 14
months, colored, of 2215 L street
N.W., about 9:50 am, June 27,
while playing near the gutter on
L street between Twenty-second
street and New Hampshire avenue
N.W., struck by truck! Weather
clear. Driver, 35, colored, with 13
years’ driving experience. No in
quest held and coroner issued cer
tificate of accidental death.
The Step That Led to Death
Fir»t First
&*)»• half.
Crossing street, not on a crosswalk... 13 ' in'Y7
(Four of the 1940 victims and three of the victims
during the first half of 1939 stepped out between or In
front of parked cars.)
Crossing street at uncontrolled intersection_ 7 7
Crossing street at controlled intersection against proper
signal ___ 3 .
Driving automobile or truck.. j a
Passenger in moving vehicle..*_~~~ 2 2
Attempting to hitch ride on moving vehicle_ 2 l
Struck by hit-and-run driver_ _ i i
(The 1940 victim was struck while crossing not on a
crosswalk and is included in that classification above.
The three 1939 victims include one struck while crossing
street not on a crosswalk, who is included in that cate
gory above.)
Standing in gutter..__... , -
Driving motorcycle_ j V
Standing in safety zone... i n
Riding bicycle...,...1111. 0 2
Attempting to stop stampeding horses_1_j .
Attempting to jump off moving vehicle_ i n
Playing in street .. , J!
Official investigation incomplete_' j j
i L i

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