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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 04, 1942, Image 38

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1942-02-04/ed-1/seq-38/

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Winning Contract
By THE FOUB ACES.
(David Bruce Burnston*. Merwtn D.
Meier. Oewtld Jacoby ana Howard
Schenken, world'* lead In* team-of
four. Inventor* ot the lyitera that
ha* beaten every other intern in
existence.)
Crime Doesn't Pay. No. 87
Today’s crime should be spotted
Bt once by every experienced player:
South dealer.
Both aides vulnerable.
♦ QJ87
V A 7
0 K Q 9
*8 4 3 3
* 10 64 N * K 6 3
<?QJ109 _% <78 6 33
0 6 5 3 WoE’ 08 7 4 3
* A Q 10 * 7 5
* A 9 3
t? K 5 4
O A J 10
*K J 9 8
The bidding:
South. West. North. East.
1NT Pass 3NT Pass
Pass Pass
West opened the queen of hearts,
holding the trick. He continued
with the nine of hearts, dummy
winning with the ace. Dummy re
turned a club, South’s jack losing to
West's queen. West continued with
another heart, and South won with
the king. Declarer then led a dia
mond to dummy’s aueen and re
turned the queen of spades. East
covered with the king and South
won with the ace. South returned
the nine of spades, letting it ride
when West played low. The next
spade from the South hand picked
up West’s ten, and South made his
contract with four spades, three dia
monds and two hearts.
You’ve undoubtedly spotted both
the crime and the criminal already.
If not. try to find them before you
read on.
East was the criminal for cover
ing the queen of spades with the
king. He should have played a low
spade and then South would have
been unable to make his contract.
Dummy’s queen would hold the trick
but what would declarer do next?
If he continued from dummy with
the jack of spades, then East could
cover without losing anything by It.
And If South won that trick. West’s
ten would control the third round
of spades. If, on the second spade
trick dummy led a low spade, East
could play low. Either West would
make the spade ten then and there,
or East would make the spade king
on the third round of spades.
It is a general principle of honor
covering not to cover the first of
touching honors. It may be correct
to cover the second, but you cannot
gain and may lose by covering the
first.
* * * *
Yesterday you were David Burn
stone’s partner and, with neither
side vulnerable, you held:
A J 9 7 6 3
<7 7 5 3 2
0 8 4
*9 3
The bidding:
Burnstone Sehenken You Jacoby
1NT Dbl. (?)
Answer—Bid two spades. You
were willing to pass an undoubled
no-trump contract, but you cannot
afford to pass the double. You ought
to be able to win two or three tricks
more at a spade contract than your
partner could at no-trump.
Score 100 per cent for two spades,
80 per cent for pass.
Question No. 987.
Today you hold the same hand,
but the bidding Is different:
Burnstone Sehenken You Jacoby
1NT Pass Pass DbL
Pass Pass (?)
What do you bid? (Answer to
morrow.)
(Released by the Bell Syndicate, me.)
Take My Word for It
By FRANK COLBY.
Surprise Word
of the Week
“To err is human, to forgive di
vine,” said Alexander Pope mere
than 200 years ago. And to err in
pronouncing ERR still is human,
for the common pronunciation
"air” has no dictionary sanction
that I know of.
Properly pronounced, the word
rhymes with burr, purr. Be sure
to say: URR.
It's Hard to Believe
Santa Barbara: Is DAINTY a
Word that applies only to women?—
Mrs. H. K.
Answer: In modem usage it sel
dom is used otherwise. But the word
is a corruption of the old French
word deintie, which means . . .
(honor bright) . . . "dignity, honor.”
It’s hard to believe that, literally,
a bearded justice of the United
States Supreme Court could be
spoken of as "a dainty man,” but it’s
true!
There Is No You
in February
No: never say “FEB-you-wary”
nor “FEB-uh-wary.”
Note that the second syllable is
»ru-; the “r” should not be silent.
The correct pronunciation is: FEB
roo-air-ee.
TEST YOUR PRONOUNCING
I. Q. My new Pronouncing Test
STAMP COLLECTOR
—By Gluyas Williams
JvJUrOR NEVER 60T AS MUCH TREASURE
OUT OF HI5 OLP STM? CDUtttiOH AS
HE POES FROM WAItHlHfc HIS NEW COlLEClION
OF DEFENSE STAMPS 6R0W
\*:±
n«mw » t» wi fruyu, y i
(XupM
CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
HORIZONTAL.
1 Crude metal
4 Baseball
team
5 Convulsive
sigh
11 To declare
12 Pertaining
to grand
parents
13 Born
14 Interjection
15 Point of a
pen
17 Relating to
bread >
19 Philippine
savage
21 Gypsy
23 Insect egg
24 To vanquish
26 Vehicle
28 Part of the
leg
31 To bring
forth
33 Observed
35 Before
36 Spanish
article
38 Crowlike
bird I
41 French con
junction
42 Law: things
44 Pikelike fish
45 Bashful
47 To stare
open
mouthed
49 Manner
51 Bacteriolo
gist's wire
54 Ecclesiasti
cal garment
56 Cask
58 Music: as
written
50 The Dog
Star
62 To intimi
date
64 While
65 Being
66 Non-pro
fessional
68 Sound ac
companying
breathing
70 Fruit drink
71 Greek letter
72 Wild ox !
VERTICAL.
1 Elliptical
2 Note of scale
3 Sea eagle
4 Wealthy
man
5 Four
6 Short sleep
7 Dash
8 Handle of a
scythe
9 Poetic:
above
10 Turkish title
11 King of
Israel
16 Teutonic
deity
18 A kobold
(var.)
30 Ibsen char
acter
22 Aquatic
rodent
25 Dervish’s
cap
27 Down
hearted
29 Anger
30 Trap
32 Ola norse
34 Part of
"to be"
36 Unit of work
37 Meadow
39 Cry of the
crow
40 Pronoun
43 Thin
46 Certainly
48 Man's name
50 Flowering
plant
52 stem
53 Comfort
55 Plant with
onionlike
root
57 Negative
59 Ocean
60 Poetic:
Hindustan
61 Scottish for
“so”
63 Contorted
67 Pronoun
69 Cooled lava
121 4 S 6 7 89 10
n U T5
14 —75 17 18 _
15 22
24 uUu 27 28 *9 I JO
L““Jl 32^^11 J4 35
35" |i? 35 39 40 4!
42 43 44 45 46~
47 48 49 50 51 52 |51
54 55 55 57 1 55
99 180 <i |&f|g62 63 ^64
65 66 67 55“ 69
70 71 72
LETTER-OUT_
_ Letter-Out for a protaetor. ,
1 ARGUED 1
_ Letter-Out and it put* out. n
2 QUOTERS *
3 Letter-Out and ha wavered. g
DEFAULTER *
4 Letter-Out acd lt'a flashy. <
ELAPSING 4
5 Letter-Out and And them on hooka. r
SPITTLE
Remove one letter from each word and rearrange to spell the word
called for in the last column. Print the letter in center column opposite
the word from which you have removed it If you have "Lettered-Out”
correctly you fit out.
Answer to Yesterday’s LETTER-OUT.
Letter-Out _ _
(C) SCENTED—NESTED (birds made a home).
(A) RESTATE—SETTER (hunting dog).
(R) GORED—DOGE (official of old Venice).
(O) MARMOSET—STAMMER (hesitate in speaking).
(L) EARLDOM—ROAMED (he wandered).
No. 5 provides a simple, non
technical way to grade your pro
nouncing ability and that of
your family and friends. Not
offered before this week. Are you
one in ten thousand who can
score 90 or better? Ask for your
free copy today.. Send a stamped
(3-cent), self-addressed envelope
to Frank Colby, in care of The
Evening Star. Ask for Pronounc
ing Test No. 5. Please make
sure that your return envelope
bears a 3-cent stamp.
(Released br The Bell Syndicate. Inc.)
Sweden’s Censor Board examined
1,304 movie films in a recent month.
Answer to Yesterday's Puzzle
cm ii cm
3
UNCLE RAY'S CORNER
—People Lived on Old-Time London Bridge
The Normans played a big part in
the history of England. They built
mighty castles and beautiul churches
and they also gave our language
thousands of words.
Yet England did not “turn Nor
man.” The Anglo-Saxons stayed in
England, doing most of the work.
After some hundreds of years the
line of Norman kings came to an
end.
The English language of today is
made up of words from many parts
of the world, but there are more
Anglo-Saxon words than from any
other source. About half of all our
words are from the Anglo-Saxon.
The rest are from French, Latin,
Danish, Dutch and other languages.
London, the chief city of England,
kept growing in size and impor
tance. By the time Queen Elizabeth
was on the throne it had a popula
tion of nearly half a million.
London people lived on both sides
of the Thames River and bridges
were needed to pass from one side to
the other. During hundreds of
years the only bridges which served
that purpose were made of wood.
Then a stone bridge was built. It
was finished in the year 1209 and it
stood for more than six centuries.
People fell into the custom of calling
it "London Bridge.”
There is a famous picture of the
me.
A view of London in the time of
Queen Elisabeth.
old London Bridge. It was drawn In
the time of Queen Elizabeth, and
shows the score of buildings which
then existed on the bridge.
It seems strange to think of a
bridge with buildings on It We
might suppose they would block the
passage of any one who wanted to
cross It
The houses did block passage to
some extent, but a kind of tunnel ran
through them. Men driving oxcarts
and persons on foot could go through
the passageway from one side of the
river to the other.
People lived in the houses on the
bridge, but the first story of almost
every dwelling was a store. The
shopkeepers sold things to the
thousands of men and women who
crossed the bridge each day. One
of them printed a handbill which
said:
“I sell all sorts of hair. You can
get it curled or straight. I also sell
ribbons, sewing silks and cards at
the lowest prices.”
There is an old story which speaks
of London Bridge “falling down.”
Parts of it did fall down from time to
time. Only 36 years after it was
htfllt five of its arch supports caved
in. A century and a half later two
more arch supports gave way.
Repairs were made, however, and the
bridge stood u^til the past century.
Then a granite bridge took its place.
(For history or general Interest section
of your scrapbook.)
If yon want a free copy of the
illustrated leaflet, “Mexico and
Mexicans,” send me a 3-cent
stamped, self-ad dressed envelope,
fat ears of The Evening Star.
Boys and Girls, Read The Junior Star Every Sunday
k
tHe spirit
(Kttp up with Tka Spirit’s war au eriata to Tka Smtday Star's comic keokj
—Bv Will Eisner
IT* HMD TO r YIS.SlB—A SPY AT • ’
0BUIV6—NOU- BfOTH,DQQPPtO FROM
SO VOUNO.AND A PLANK WHIN A
POTTY .TOO •••• BABY — AND
UV1D SUCH AN YOU* gtOTH
ixcrriNO ufk« $avtm thk
DtCTATOA 2r
I 2-+
no woNOtft you a ioh.the rest \
NAME IS PtfTtNY / SOUNDS LIKE A >
PLAKt ft WHAT PULP THRILLER —
- AFTER. FATHER DIED
' X GREW UP IN THE
SECRET SOCIETIES THAT
ALWAYS EXISTED IN „
EUROPE / X WAS IN; . >
VOLVBD IN THE TYRANIAN
AND AWT THAT \ WBLL.tfM STH A I
YOU'VE CLEANED 1 MIMSES OF TWE
UP THE LEGION J BLMOPBAN
OP DOOM? / UNOESGAOUND —
■/ I MM/r FOB A I
■fMV ASSIGNMBMTfJ
WtWiTUpg—■
OAKY DOAKS
Trademark A a s 11 • d
For O. & Patent Offlee
%
(Oak ft adveatures art a re tutor feature ef The Sumday Star’s colored comics.)
—By R. B. Fuller
GOOD GIRL, NELLIE-1 KNEW
you could do rr/jmgawm
1-4
BUT, OAKY- HOW RE WE
GOING TO GET THROUGH
THAT SNOW/*
r -m
WAIT
AP Fcitir*
raw*
DINKY DINKERTON
(Don’t mitt Dinktrtnn t kilnriont edornturet in the colored comic tection on Sunday!./
—By Art Huhta
r SO YOUR WIPE THAT'S RIGHT. THREE DAYS ^B
HAS MYSTERIOUSLY AGO SHE LEFT FOR THE DEPOT 1
DISAPPEARED ?! TO MEET A YOUNGER SISTER. 1
, AND YOU AS/ thats THE LAST 1 SAW/ OF HER. I
L TRIED TO FIND HER AND k
HER SISTER BUT NO LOCK/ B
^ l BROUGHT A
/ ByPlCnuRE of her^^M
THIS ONE
IS ME
k A
r OX., XU. TAKE TOUR CAjL 1 SWEAR)
Bar IF X FIND THERE'S MORE A 1 OONT L
TO THIS DISAPPEARANCE THAN) KNOW <
TOUVE TOLD ME, IU.TURN /WHAT • V
TU WHOLE aTHINS CNERTO HAPPEN® /
WELL CHECH HIS STORV X
FROM START TO FlMISH ! 1
FIRST. WELL <30 TO TWE ,
SFUNKIE
(Tkere’t slwayt s fall suets »f adventure sad fuu in the colored romic lection of The Sunday Star.)
—By Loy Byrnes
OtCH, HER.. BUTCH OH BCV-LEAP ME 1
KNOWS A PLACE TO (TJ AN*/ PLACE
WHERE W* CAN HA* BUTCH Sf/S
SOME FUN WHILE THE OH, BUT ER— NO,
SOL PIERS UNLOAP I GUESS NOT...
^OUR TRUCKS. TWS TIAAE...^
I'M GONNA STICK WITH My
LITTLE PAL HERE, ANP
LOOK THE TOWN OVER
W , ^
...AND BECAUSE OF SPUNKIE, BED'S DE
CISION PROVES TO BE A LIFE SAVER !
NON N HOPEVILtE, BRUTE AND FORCE
ADVANCE ON 'NEW MOMMY'S* HOUSE, EX
PECTING TO FIND SPUNWE STAX THERE
” 1
WE SHAU. SAY Wfc
BRING NEWS OF BOM*
BARDIA! THAT VltX
> GAIN US
[ ADMITTANCE!
In 111—I_
K
yP OHH«h! <-50ME
jf BCPV AT M DOOO!
I NOW WHO COULD- I
I W0NPe3._CH, COULD
lrr...cOOtP rr re?
BO
(Bo U just as •nterestiat~iust os human—in the colored section of The Sunday Star.)
—By Frank Beck
r I UKE THAT! I CATCH A ^
L MOUSE AND THE FOLKS JUST -
7 SAf'WHAT OF IT, THAT'S i
WH&'S EXPECTED OF A CAT.' j
[PHOOIE.. I SHOULD >M0RRY ,
t ABOUT A MOUSE. LET IT (
^^60 r it wwnj
WHAT ARE YOU >/
S SCARED OF,
LET'S 60 AND
SEE WHAT BO £
3 IS MIDINS r/
a^jFROM - -Jpp
FLYIN'JENNY
(Fifin' Jenny also flies every Sunday in the colored comic section.)
—By Frank Wead and Russell Keaton
Commander jones'oppice, naw
DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, P.C.
/toUtL GET OPFiClAtVVOU'RE MAKING U5"
( THANKS POR DOiNG A ) PEEUVERY PROUD,
\6REAT J03 POR OS^COMMANDE^
l-*r
'WE can 100< AT
"tmat—twats *waw«>
these are pessowacV* X
WCfTES PROM 1HI V IN HlS )
PRESIDENT.' OWKI \
\L y f hand- A
■ ■ ^. UrtZmNS//
I'D LIKE TO HAVE
that signature
OKI A 6lAK><
j
MUTT AND JEFF
(Watch far Matt and Jiff’s lamthablt escapadei in tht colored comic section of The Sunday Star.)
—By Bud Fisher
MUTT, DID you SEE] llStf** j
TrilSPAWTOFTKE Urt5aA(SEDU£
folks BACK home to THE WAR? 1
ARE DOING WITHOUT
THEIR CARS TO ^ 1
ISAVE ON TIRESJJ I
MAVBE we'll 60 BACK If VEH A
to the horse and r BUT V
BU66V AND PEOPLE) wHAT
WILL DO MORE WALKING WILL
WHICH IS HEALTHIER^ FOLKS
1533 m
the spare TlREiS /this iS what j
, asleep IN THE / I ^_£A/4l1AN,)
^ rumble
DRAFT! E
(Laugh at Draftio mud Oie.e iu Tha Sunday Star's colored comic section)
By Paul Fogarty
|_e'« OI?OPIN VAA*WE *
MEPE AN’CHBWTM' PBOBeSLV
FAT* WITH COME OF HAOOA LOT
Moae <
XPECIENCE
DEN DEM
_
OH.VBAH•
OlME AN* ME —
WE'VE HAOOA I
LOT Of* SERVICE I
T ALLRl<3WT,QK. I
7”"vaa ■ we *->.
BEEN THRU QA ]
/ / MILL • WE'RE A /
I 1 COUPLE Of* VET®, \
l \VA MIGHT BAY- J
^-4 WHEffB --v]
cmo voo nuow« ]
^ COME WOMf 1
sthe j^~
PHUPPINES/V
'—Trvr-V
0*Nie, WHAT'S
DUMBER THAN A
DUMB CLUCK FROM
-§£j

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