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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 09, 1942, Image 14

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Those Cinema Brawl Boys
Are Trained for the Job
When They Wreck a Place, It’s Art;
Donlevy Writes Verse on the Side;
Goldwyn Asks Shaw for Quote
By JAY CARMODY.
Specialization department: If you ever have marveled at the thor
oughness with which movie saloons, night clubs, etc., are wrecked—or
even if you haven’t—you might as well know that the wrecking crew is
composed of specialists. Its members include former athletes, ex-prize
fighters and stunt men. They are hired as a group for this special job.
Their work is steadily improving.
* * * *
Literature department: Brian Donlevy, that tough hombre, Is
proua oi tne tact that he is a very
rough fellow, likes to really mix it
in those movie scenes which call
for violence. ..
There's anoth
er side to the
man, however,
that you might
not have heard
about.
He also writes
poetry but not
under the name
of Brian Don
levy. His nom de
plume is Porter
Down, which is
a paraphrase of
the name of the
town in which
he was born in
Jar Carmodr.
County Armagh. Ireland.
We’ve never read any of his poetry
either.
* * * *
Research department: George
Bernard Shaw is being queried by
Samuel Goldwyn on just what he
actually said when some one once
asked him if he had ever heard of
Babe Ruth.
"Whose baby is Ruth?” is the
gpneral idea of Shaw's response but
Mr. Goldwyn. ever a fellow to quote
a man correctly, wants to make
sure.
* * * *
Title department: "Not A Ladies'
Man," which is now in process of
being made at Columbia studios, has
been changed to "Just Another
Dame.”
Makes it more positive, no doubt.
* * * *
Finance department: Paramount,
which has been telling the world
how wonderful Veronica Lake is.
has just been asked by Miss Lake
to give her $2,000 a week if she's
that good
Paramount hasn't—yet.
Deglamorization department: Joan
Crawford, who was so enormous
ly happy to wear that ghastly
scar in "A Woman's Face," wants to
go right on being glamourless.
If M-G-M would only let her.
which it says it won't, her next role
would be that of May Flavin in
which she would be a wa.'her
woman.
That would be quite a change for
a former mannequin, but it is the
kind of change Miss Crawford would
like.
The studio.-however, is in a tut,
tut mood.
It probably will end up in a row.
* * * *
Music department: "I Can't Get
to First Base with You." which Mrs.
Lou Gehrig wrote back in 1935. and
a song which profoundly did not
get to first base with any one. will
be sung in the motion picture
version of her popular husband s
life. *
* * * *
Horror department—Frank Stock
ton's “The Lady or the Tiger?”
which created such a row back in
the 1880s—and never stopped so far
as we know—has just been made
into a one-reel picture by Metro
Goldwvn-Mayer. Just as Stockton
before it. the studio leaves the story
unfinished, leaving each individual
to decide for himself, if possible,
whether the sweetheart's signal
<- -
sent her lover to his death or to
the other woman.
It would be something to quar
rel about if there wasn’t so much
else to quarrel about.
* * * *
Realism department — Pare Lo
rentz, who proved to his, and others’,
satisfaction that amateur actors did
very well in his movies such as “The
Plow That Broke the Plains,” is
still convinced of it now that he
has become a Hollywood producer.
For his first picture, “Name, Age
and Occupation,” he has just hired
his first actor, fellow named Rob
ert Ryan, who was a former Chi
cago tunnel digger,
i Lorentz is pretty sure that Ryan
is precisely the kind of actor to play
in a picture called “Name, Age and
Occupation.”
Time, of course, will tell, but Lo
rentz has made no mistakes so far
; in his judgment of talent for movie
j cameras.
VIRGINIA BELLE—Kay Aldrich, who came or “went,” from
Richmond to play just about the prettiest girl in "Louisiana
Purchase.”
Chaney, Jr.,
As Wolf Man,
Invades Pix
By J. W. STEPP.
The art of the supernatural
thriller would still seem to be a lo6t'
| one as far as concerns Hollywood. I
Not since Frederic March pattered !
through London streets as Mr. j
Hyde, and Boris Karloff made his
first bow as Dr. Frankenstein's chill- j
child have movie people lifted a |
painstaking finger on the name of i
the eerie. Perhaps they feel the
world today offers enough real live j
horror through the deeds of such
master H-for-horror men as Hitler,
Hevdrich, Hirothito. et al., on which
they can more seriously capitalize.
Universal, for example, with its
"Wolf Man.” currently showing at
the Pix Theater.
This vehicle features Ixm Chaney,
jr.. as a rather pathetic, and cer
tainly unawesomely made-up. were
wolf "as the Thing which severs in
nocents’ jugular veins in the mists
of English moors. Now, possibly, if
; Lon’s late and greatly missed father
had only been here. But then, even
the big names in "Wolf Man's” cast
j —Claude Rains and Maria Ouspen
; skaya—were performing without
benefit of stimulus.
Werewolferv. of course, is an es
tablished terror medium to movie
goers, along with that of vampirism,
zombieism and other related forms
of schizophrenia—or are zombies
something else again?
i Thrown together in "Wolf Man's”
placid maelstrom of gypsies, baronial
! estates, unearthly yelps and British •
j constabulary may be found other
persons of mixed acting repute—
I Ralph Bellamy, Warren William
! and Patric Knowles.
There is also a young and attrac
tive lady named Evelyn Ankers who
loves the doomed. Evelyn had best
: get out of the risky habit of running
unaccompanied about moors at
night. She might trip over a stump.
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floor shows nightly 0:30 and 11:30. Reservations, phone Adams 0700.
J THE HAY-ADAMS HOUSE
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Cocktails. Dining in an atmosphere of charm, dignity
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Organ music during dinner. Cool air-conditioning.
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Luncheon • Cocktails • Dinner • Supper
Dinner Dancing Beginning at 7:30
Continnoo, daneins with two orchestras from 10 ta 1 A.M.
Washington Bldg., 15th ot N. Y. Ave.
Lounge Ktvtera hotel 2400 sixteenth st.
OPEN NOON—COCKTAILS S TO 7 P.M.
Featurin' IDA CLABKE at the Hammond Orcan
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Completely Air-Conditioned No Minimum or Cover* Except Saturday*
Then SI.AO After 9 P.M.
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Ml I ■ Cocktails from 30c; Sandwiches from 20e; Daily
M&i ■ ■ specials, from ftOc: Luncheon. 11 to 3; Cocktail
MHI II 1 to «; Dinner, 8 to 10. After Theatre Till % a.m.
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Officially “AJhA’* Recommended
Audience Warmly Receives
Menuhin in Annual Concert
Violinist Presents Taxing
Program With Superb
Technique at Constitution Hall
By ALICE EVERSMAN.
Yehudi Menuhin, one of the young
est of the coterie of famed violin
ists. yet at the same time a veteran
in their ranks, returned to Consti
tution Hall yesterday afternoon for
his annual appearance. With an
unassailable artistic reputation al
ready established in his prodigy
years, he has embarked now on that
interesting experience of making
his personality and its relation to
his art more important than the
showy display of his first public bid
for fame. That he has an enthusi
astic following here as elsewhere
was confirmed by the large audi
ence attending yesterday's concert
and their hearty welcome.
Be it said at once that Mr. Menu
hin played superbly a taxing pro
gram that brought his brilliant gifts
constantly to the fore. But it was
not that alone that made his con
cert of absorbing interest. It was,
rather, the close amalgamation of
musical insight and technical mas
tery that made each dependent
upon and unified to the other. In
many of the great technicians of
the instrument, fixation on their
mechanical powers is almost ines
capable, with now rfnd then a dis
traction in the discovery of a deeper
musical idea. But with Mr. Menu
hin the two go side by side to the
greater end of an all-round finished
performance.
Test of Musicianship.
The path in musical perfection
which Mr. Menuhin trods uniquely
is the ability to use his superb surety
and authority in matters of bowing
and finger dexterity imperceptibly.
He had as his tour de force the
original Paganini "Concerto in D
major" with the formidable Sauret
cadenza. Kreisler has made a more
appealing work of his arrangement
of the concerto but the fact re
mains that the original is the test
of virtuosity as well as musician
ship.
Mr. Menuhin played the intricate
passages brilliantly with unshake
able assurance in his fleet delivery.
But he made music of this show
piece, taking every opportunity to
bring to the fore his rounded, beau
tiful tone and making the cantabile
interludes poetic in their signifi-1
cance. Even in the cadenza, which
demands the utmost from the player,
yet is not particularly rewarding as
a composition, he managed to bring |
color with his interpretive feeling.
For once the merits of the Paga
nini concerto as something more
than a technical vehicle could be
appreciated.
Divergent Material.
The two sonatas included in the
program, Beethoven's “No. 1 in D
major, op. 12, No. 1” and the De
busfiy "Sonata in G minor” pro
vided widely divergent material for
a musician of Mr. Menuhin's seri
ousness. The direct, natural quality
of this early essay of Beethoven in
the sonata form with its freshness
and gaiety were outlined with artis- I
tic simplicity while the sophistry
and elusiveness of Debussy were
painted in masterly manner by the
subtle use of expressive tonal color.
In fact, the Debussy sonata might
be considered the high spot of the
program in which the union of Mr.
Menuhin's thoughtful mentality and
technical resources found a supreme
outlet.
The very charming and seldom
heard ‘ Hungarian Dance No. 3 in F
major” by Brahms opened the final
group which consisted of two other
works in the same character, the
Brahms-Joachim “Hungarian Dance
No. 4" and Ravel's concert rhapsody,
Tzigane.” The temperamental read
ing of these three compositions beau
tified by warmth of tone, ended the
concert with the audience wildly
applauding. Encores, varied as to
mood, but of popular apoeal pro
longed the program until the lights '
were dimmed in the hall.
Throughout, the finelv balanced
accompaniments of Adolph Bailer
always attuned to the artist's nu
ances. added considerably to the
success of the recital.
Added to Cast
Edward Small has added Otto
Kruger to the cast of his new pro- j
duction. "Friendly Enemies." the .
new film version of the famous i
Broadway stage success, with (
Charlie Ruggles in the title role.
Where and When
Current Theater Attraction*
and Time of Showing
National—"My Sister Eileen." tjie
hilarity of life in Greenwich Village: ,
8:30 p.m.
Screen.
Capitol—"Joe Smith. American.”,
the average guy in wartime: 10:45
a m., 1.3:10. 5:25. 7:45 and 10:15 p.m.
Stage shows: 12:15, 2:20, 4:40, 7 and
9:05 p.m.
Columbia—“Nazi Agent,” Conrad
Veidt and G-men in action: 11 a.m.,
12:40. 2:30. 4:20. 6:10, 8 and 9:50 p.m.
Earle—"Louisiana Purchase.” fil- ;
musical or the lavish scale: 11 a.m..
1:40, 4:25, 7:10 and 10 p.m. Stage
shows: 1, 3:50. 6:35 and 9:20 pin.
Keith's—“Hellzapoppin'," the Ol
sen-Johnson antic on the screen:
11:20 a.m., 1:25, 3:30, 5:35, 7:40 and
9:50 p.m.
Little—“Citizen Kane,” Orson
Welles’ exciting story of a genius: j
11 a.m., 1:45, 4:20. 7 and 9:45 p.m.'
Metropolitan—“Wild Bill Hickok
Rides.” with Bruce Cabot rootin’'
and tootin': 11:20 a m., 1:25, 3:25,
5:30, 7:35 and 9:40 p.m.
Palace—“Son of Fury.” Tyrone
Power, adventurer of the seas: 10:45
a.m., 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:25 and 9:40
p.m.
Pix—“The Wolf Man." woof, woof: j
12:45, 4:30, 6:30. 8:20 and 10:10 p.m. |
Trans-Lux — News and shorts: I
Continuous from 10 a.m.
DELIVERY DOG—Is Bossie, Jane Frazee’s cocker spaniel, who
is shown delivering the evening paper to his mistress, who does
not seem at all disturbed by what might be on the front page.
Poor Mrs. Chips Wishes
She Could Be Meanie -
Those Sweet Womanly Characters
Have Driven Her to Revolt;
Next Role May Prove Best
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
NEW YORK.
"Yes, I killed him! And I’m not sorry. Why did I do it? Because
he broke a date to take me to the movies, the skunk!”
The above, a little better perhaps, is the type of dialogue and the
kind of woman that Greer Garson wants to play in her future screen roles.
In other words Greer wants to be a movie meanie.
•'I’m sick and tired of the sweet women they make me play in all mv
pictures,” Greer, clad in a startling*
“shocking” pink suit and hat, tells
me during her brief New York stop
over between Canada and Holly
wood.
“I’m bored with being a womanly
woman in my pictures; I’m always
so horribly understanding and
always a married woman, never a
girl. I’ve been Mrs. Chips, Mrs.
Gladney and Mrs. Miniver (her last
film i. I've been padded from here
to there to build me up as a middle
aged woman. It's high time the
public saw me as I really am. Look.
I'm not so old, and I'm not fat at
all.” And Greer stands sideways to
show off the glory of her slender
width.
* * * *
Miss Garsons revolt against the
fine females she usually portrays on
the screen is a common complaint
in Hollywood. Bette Davis fought
desperately for the part of bad-girl
Mildred in "Of Human Bondage,”
and has continued her preference
Holden Gives
Native Music
Recital
The Washington College of Music
presented William Holden, pianist,
in a faculty recital yesterday after
noon at the Phillips Memorial Gal
lery. Mr. Holden played an entire
program of American music, com
prehensive in its scope and inter
preted with the taste and convincing
style which characterize all of his
extensive repertoire.
The first group embracing the
nostalgic beauty of the music of
the American Negro consisted of
five songs set by Blair Fairchild
of Boston. Mr. Fairchild, after serv
ice in the diplomatic corps, settled
in Paris, where he wrote music, not
pretentious, but of a deep sincerity.
The “Piano Variations,’’ by Aaron
Copland, which followed, are a rep
resentation of the present machine
age. employing bold dissonances
which have the strength and some
times the hardness of steel, set
forth with great rhythmic intricacy.
Mr. Holden played the work with
meticulous attention to the details
and with fine understanding.
Edward MacDowell, the first
American to speak consistently a
musical speech that was definitely
his own, attempts in the "Norse
Sonata"—the most significant work
of the afternoon—to free himself
from the restrictions of form. The
sympathy which Mr. Holden dis
played in this interpretation brought
out the extended span of the phrases
and the epic breadth of nobility
and dignity which MacDow’ell wrote
into the music.
Turning his attention to smaller
compositions there was heard the
"Lake at Evening,” by Grlffes (who
died while very young); “The Tides
of Manaunaun," by the contempo
rary Henry Cowell, and three
preludes by George Gershwin.
Mr. Cowell, who defies musical
precedents, has gained recognition
for the validity of his aesthetic
viewpoint, and his use of new musi
cal resources was dramatically por
trayed by Mr. Holden. The Gersh
win preludes were arrestingly lovely.
While Gershwin represented a
phase of American musical Interest
less serious than others, his work
contained promise, of Importance
which might have lowered had not
his untimely death intervened.
Encores included a novelette by
MacOowell, a scherzo by Grilles
and "Improvisation in Several
Keys.” bv Walter Gross Mr. Holden
deserves high commendation for his
service to the cause of American
music in planning a program of
such Interest and musical worth.
The content of his program was
of unexpected timeliness since the
pianist has been called to military
service and is leaving in 10 days
for induction into the Army, leaving
a reputation as an outstanding mu
sician of Washington. This was the
eighth annual program he has
played in the city and the repertoire
included in these programs amount
ed to some 80 compositions of
significant piano literature. S. A.
Out of the Old Title
Paramount has chosen “Young
and Willing” as the title of the
screen version of the Broadway play
"Out of the Frying Pan."
Edward H. Grifflth, producer-di
rector of the film, states that the
new name Is more in harmony with
the theme of the Francis Swann
drama, which tells of the efforts
of stagestruck youngsters to crash
Broadway.
Theater Parking
35'
6 P.N. to 1 A.M.
CAPITAL GARAGE
1320 N. Y. Avc., Bet. 13th b 14th
_ DANCING.
MORALE
. . Is Important for Tic
tory . . . and dancina is one J
of the prime factors of
America’s hlch morale. <
Learn the latest steps now. ,
Dron in for a free cuest
lesson today.
ARTHUR MURRAY
1101 Conn. Arc. Dl. 2460
>-—
for wicked women roles. And most
of the ingenues in Hollywood state
lisplngly that it is hard to be them
selves on the screen, that it is
easier to make a hit as a baddie.
I’m sorry Greer feels the same
.way. There are so few real honest
to-goodness women on the screen,
that Greer, who gives the "weaker"
sex a tremendous boost with her
gracious personality, voice, face and
figure, should n6t, desert the thin
ranks of fine movie-womanhood.
“I'd have given half my hair
(which is beautiful and red) to have
played the Bette Davis part in ‘The
Little Poxes,’ ” continues the "fugi
tive from a bustle" her own de
scription of herself). "I talked with
Willie Wyler, who directed Bette
(he did the same for "Mrs. Miniver")
and he agreed that it would have
suited me and perhaps have been
better for me than for Bette, who
was already so well established in
that type of role, whereas, I would
be startling in such a part, as no
one would expect me to be like that.”
* * * *
Failing pictures that would create
hatred for her on the screen. Miss
Garson would like to make people
laugh. She is a good comedienne
and made a big hit in a Hollywood
stage appearance ifor charity) in
some Noel Coward playlets.
Greer had hoped to remain in
New York to make an appearance
at the Navy relief show March 10.
but has received a telegram recall
ing her to Hollywood for minor re
takes on "Mrs. Miniver.” The pic
turization of the Jan Struther best
seller was previewed in Hollywood a
few nights ago and to Judge by the
ovation, will repeat its book success
on the screen. Greer, who co-stars
in the film with Walter Pidgeon.
tells me that a great deal of the
story has been changed in the movie 1
transition.
The bunch of pink flowers and
AMUSEMENTS.
Mats. Wfd * «at. at S:M
“The Smion'i Uu^mI
LflUfll.'” —NELSON B. BELL. P<»M
NEXT WK. BEG. MOlU-Siats Thar*.
The Theatre Guild Presents
Philip Barry'a Vf» ComtJj
Without Love
With
wmm BEPBIBN
ELLIOTT NICEST
tm., Orrh.. S.*»; W*e-5»t. Mats., t.i*
fMMm
B- Doors Open 10:301. m.
W HOPE • VnZORDU
Victor MOORE
■ Pvimoot’! AU TECHNICOLOR
"LOUISIANA PURCHASr
n.NKISM««w
MARIO t FLORIA end Other Acts j
nmuumouse in* i** *
5§§§§^ ny MV nut BOMS zSzkSSi.
m^^^^S^ESSSSSwSSSSSSSiSmimsiSi^^
NOW Doors Open 10 30 a m. ^
Wild Bill Hickok Bides ^
A Warner Bros. Picture w.irt
Constance Bruce Warren
IjNNETT ‘CABOT ‘ WIILIAM |
r At so SUPERMAN Cartoon ^§|
RKO
**"7
*uw«wn
with orl^hal
STAGEtfTARS
OLSEN vd JOHNSON
I ?
WaltIDisney's triumph,
M "FANTASI A"
'PI'Y BBMHB
FIRST WASHINGTON SHOWING
reastltatiea Hall. Next Wed. Etc.. S:M F.M.
The Warld'a Greatest Basse-Baffe!
SALVATORE
BACCAL0N1
Direct Iran Met. Oaera ia eaeratie r»a
eert la eaatame. (1.(5. (1.10. (1.15.
Mrs. Deraer’a. ISO® G St. (Dreep’al NA. 1151
M IEST PICTURE OF 1M1
■ ORSON WELLES
_L
__
netting Greer is wearing for a hat
is the first chapeau she has pur
chased in three years.
"You know how it is in Holly
wood," she reminds me, "you wear
practically nothing there except a
pair of slacks. You wear slacks
going to the studio, you Wear them
to go home, at which time you are
too tired to do anything except
eat and sleep.”
For her trip to Canada Greer
bought her first mink fur coat.
"Lucky I had the coat up there, it
was quite cold,” she says.
Her mother, who accompanied
her from Hollywood and who lives
with her there, described Greer,
sitting outside a Canadian broad
casting station in the snow signing
autographs with but an evening
dress and the said fur coat between
her darling daughter and pneu
monia. The trip was to help raise
money for the new Canadian victory
loan. The actress surprised the
residents of Montreal by addressing
them in French.
Next movie for Miss Garson is
"Random Harvest,” opposite Ronald
Colman. She thinks the role will
be her best to date.
(Released by the North American
Newspaper A^ance. Inc 1
AMUSEMENTS. AMUSEMENTS.
List 1 Days • Doort opto 10:30
GLENN MILLER
md hit BAND at
12.30, 2:3$, 4 55. 7:10, 0:20
Scraan
“JOE SMITH,AMERICAN”
THURSDAY
“THE LADY HAS PLAHS”
and they're on her beck!
Ray MILLANO 'Paulitti 600D1RD
S'»t« jam i
JIMMY
DURANTE
In Ptrwn
TYRONE POWER ««ol! lom«a«o
nenu nr rilDV” JACK ,INNV
I aun Ur rUni Erne,'I vbiisck'tC'm'dy)
L with GENE TIERNEY “TO »E tr NOT TO W'Jj
hi.'va!
scnatob!
fc_—•
3znnzzc3D
Lut I Diyi • Omm Oni 10:41 THURSDAY
UH17I ■CEMT,,c"'u vi,0T "WOMAN of tho TEAR"
HUI AOERI AIR ATARI miCIR TRACT
^/jf Time in Washington HMhtrm HtRRURR.
(7*7^
MORTIFIED I
ACADEMY of Perfect Sound Photoplay.
E. Lawrence Phillips' Theater Beautiful.
Cont. From 4:30 P M.
ALICE PAYE CARMEN MIRANDA.
JOHN PAYNE CESAR RCMERO in
“WEEK END IN HAVANA.”
AIjso
“THE DEVIL PAYS OFF/1
With J. EDWARD BROMBERG and
06A MASSEN
ft D1*Y 48th A Mats. Are. N.W.
,iri« WO. I8«M>
show Plaee of tbe Nation’s Capital.
Free Parkin* for 500 Cars in Rear.
1942’a Academy Award Picture
“How Green Was My Valiev,”
With WALTER PIDGEON MAUREEN
O HARA. DONALD CRISP
Mon. Tugs . Doors Own ai 5:30 PM
»TI »e 1331 H St. N.E. AT 8300.
n A lifu) Cont From 1 to 1 i PM
“TWO-FACED WOMAN,”
With GRETA GARBO MELVYN DOUGLAS.
CONSTANCE BENNETT. ROLAND YOUNG.
Also on Sam. Program—
‘LOOK WHO’S LAUGHING,’
Wirh EDGAR BERGEN.
Charlie McCarthy
TARAIINA ’"b * V C Aar. SF
••nnwunn you belong to me
with BARBARA STANWYCK HENRY
FONDA. Also “THE GAY BALCON
nun r Panna. An. at 'list St.
lainirlaC. Phone RE. 0181.
Matinee 2 PM
WALTER PIDGEON MAUREEN OHARA
in HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY
'Academy Award Picture!. Feature at
2:20. 4:40. 7:05. 0:30.
CONGRESS w NTRh*87oo” SE~
Complete Shows at 8:15. 8 45 MICKEY
ROONEY JUDY GARLAND in BABES
ON BROADWAY" At 8:48 and 9 18.
DUMBARTON th e
BROTHERS’’ with DOUGLAS FAIR
BANKS. Jr : AKIM TAMIROFF Also
News. Selected Short Subjects.
FAIRLAWN ,T*7G”^ ^,dsE
Complete Shows at 8 15 and *45
CHARLES BOYER and OLIVIA DE HAV.
LILAND in HOLD BACK THE DAWN."
At 8:50 and 9:2(•._
f!(tFFNRV*T T Adult. 2.V Free Parking.
ununouil E FLYNN OLIVIA DE
HAVILVAND in THEY DIED WITH
THEIR BOOTS ON ' At 7. 9 15
HIGHLAND r£"V*?r "
MICKEY ROONEY and JUDY GARLAND
in “BABES ON BROAWAY At 8 45
and 9:15.
1 inn 3227 M St. N.W. WHITE ONLY.
laMell Double Feature—Positively the
Biggest Show in Northwest BETlTr
GRABLE. DON AMBCHE JACK OAKIE
in MOON OVER MIAMI in Techni
color. Also GENE AUTRY'S Latest and
Best—“COWBOY SERENADE
V ITTf P 608 ®*k st. N.w.
iaAAllab Bet F and G
“CITIZEN KANE.” _
DDTVrrCC 1119 H St. N.E. 1.1 2800
rmm.ua com i to n pm
“MEET JOHN DOE.”
With GARY COOPER iWinner of
Academy* 1947 Award!. EDWARD
ARNOLD Also on Same Program—
‘PARACHUTE BATTALION.’
With ROBERT PRESTON NANCY KELLY.
HARRY CAREY
(•TAWTflH 8th and C Sis NF
•J I fiil A Uil Finest Sound Equipment.
Cont. From 5 30 PM
“Ladies in Retirement,"
With IDA LUPINO LOUIS HAYWARD.
ELSA LANCHESTER
Also FRANKIE DARRO in
“LET’S GO COLLEGIATE.”
frilkTAD Minn. Aae. at Banning Rd.
aLRAlUn N.E Phone TR 7800
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER 194 1
“How Green Was My Valley, ’
With WALTER PIDGEON and RODDY
MacDOWELL Doors ooen 8. reature
Shown 8 40 and 9:30
—SIDNEY LUST THEATERS—
BETHESDA 7' S,„K.l.7:n,ind A”
WI. 2888 nr BRad. 9838 Free Parking
Today-Tomor. At 8:34. 9:07.
Gary Cooper. Joan Leslie
in “SERGEANT YORK.”
hippodrome w-ijir
Double Feature.
Abbott and Costello in
“KEEP ’EM FLYING ”
MERLE OBERON. ALAN MARSHAL in
“LYDIA.”
CAMEO Ml Kainier< Md W4 9748
Today-Tomor. Double Feature
Bette Davis, Monte Woolley
and Ann Sheridan in ‘The
Man Who Came to Dinner.’
Also “Target for Tonight.”
_<Arademy_Award Winner >
HYATTS VOLE BHya?t*Tni*!,,M<d.
RA. 9778 er Hyatts. 9598.
Free Parkin*
Today-Tomor. At 8:50 9:25.
Robert Taylor and Lana
Turner in “Johnny Eager.”
Mftfl RPckyillf. Md. Reck. |9I.~
nilaU Free Parking
MICKEY ROONEY and
JUDY GARLAND in
‘BABES ON BROADWAY.’
ARCADE ^
Double Feature—Cont. 8:45-11.
ABBOTT A- COSTELLO In BUCK
PRIVATES. IRENE DUNNE. ROB
ERT MONTGOMERY, UNFINISHED
BUSINESS.”
ARLINGTON FALLS CHURCH, VAJ
Inleraoatlon Phone OXfer) 11.19—F. C. 1SSS
STATE A"?L* Fr" Fjrkins
WALTER PIDGBON RODDY ' Mc
My'vaLLEY H°W OREE* WAS
LEE
T * ^ShowV*^
ARLINGTON Siffi-AM:
Amnio Free Parkins.
GARY COOPER. BARBARA 8TAN
WYCK in "BALL OP FIRE "
WILSON 1729 w,lM>>
VTUsSVn Phone OX. 1180.
WALLACE BEERY and MARJORIE
MAIN in ‘THE BOOLE BOUNDS"
ASHTON 3188 Wilson Bled.
JUDY GARLAND, MICKEY ROONEY
In "BABES ON BROADWAY."_
BUCKINGHAM aStfSMS:
GARY COOPER in SERGEANT
YORK.”
Buy Defense Bonds and Stamps
For Additional In formation
Phone Theaters Direct
WARNER RROS. THEATERS
In Event of Busy Signal
Call Republic 0800
BERNHEIMER S THEATERS
All Time Schedule* Given In Warner
Bros. Ada. Indicate Time Feature la
Presented.
_ Theatres Ha vlnF Matinee*._
AMBASSADOR
Matinee | P.M.
BO? HOPE VERA ZORINA and
mT{2^R.o^,OORE ln LOUISIANA
PURCHASE tin Technicolor). At
l:tl5. 8:lti. S:I5. 7 in. u :to
BEVEBLY ti; ;?" *
ispsnir-»,r;,7,“
VEIDT and KAARE.N VERNE in ■ ALU
THROUGH THE NIGHT At 1|.“
•l_:lft._.->-15 7:30 _« 4o_ Cartoon.
CALVERT M-4 w,»- *»«■ «•».
canv *•:«• Mat. I P M.
STANWVr2°PER „.a,n,d BARBARA
,*»*• •
CENTRAL V.a a m '
\HTnvAYRES »Id LIONEL BARRY
to5v-‘" ."D.R KILDARE S VIC
TORY At 1(1 1 15 4 55 i, 'O
CLAUDETTE COLBERT RAY MIL
LAND and BRIAN AHERNE ■■
SKYLARK At 11 10, 15 R 55.
KENNEDY K‘,nfd’’ »• «fml
nuinu/i ra «»;oo. uat 1 pm
Parktng Snare Available to Patron*.
GARY COOPER in SERGEANT
YORK with WALTER BRENNAN
and_ JOAN LESLIE At l .iti. 4 15.
« -55 »:4t. 'Mai all seats 4f>e mr.
fax Eveninp. all «ear* f»5c inc tax
No Advance in_ Children *_ Prices *!
PENN p* *"• *•74,1 s.e.
„“,n „ FR 57*90 Mat. I P.M
o/dv* ^5ir^cAT*i,,bl' ,*' r,|t«lt<.
rtI,J*i-vS2CPER and BARBARA
STANWYCK in BALL OF FIRF •
At l :(>]._3j05._5:1 n. 7 15. p;^n.
S7ERIDAN Ga Avf A Sheridan.
\fiTro "" Rv 2*00. Mat. 1 P M
ji,L.\ER PIDGEON and MaUREFN
<™ARA in HOW GREEN WAS MY
valley 'Academv Award Picture).
At 1:3.). 4.10. t; 4if. 915
SILVER Ga Ave- * Colesville PikeT
™,TL“ .5.500 Mat. I P.M
^ xr.kl,P.T .Snar^ Available to P*trnn«.
WALTER PIDGEON and MAURF^V
® HARA . H9W GREEN WAR MY
valley (Academv Award Picture*.
At l.Ki, ? 35. 9 45
TIVOLI Mtb * Part Rd N.W.“
1800 Mat. I P.M.
RT?Jn-i7^9°PER arld BARBARA
aTA,NW,Y9K 'n, "BALL OF FIRE **
At _5:15. 7:15 fi 40
UPTOWN ronn- Are. * Newark:
pw1U"n WO. 5100 Mat. 1 P.M.
Pya'nc Available t» Patron*.
and BARBARA
*t7*?*??*■ >" BALL OF FIRE '*
At 1 3:10. 5:15. 7:15. ft 4ft.
Theatre* Having Eve. Performance*.
APOLLO 6-mpS
MAlW ^BUC^E 'itZiPJa*
At H, 7 55. 9:45
AVALON 561:4 fonD Ave.~~N\w!
WALTER PIDGEON and MAUREEN
VAL?FV ,n .”OVV GREEN WAS MY
VALLEY At 5 15. 7:20. 9 ,10
iAcademv Award Picture t
AVE. GRAND 6I5i^"i:s£
ijNnq.v 9ARG.£?UaRd MARGARET
^IVoi}£en^^,?a^-/?r
COLONY *”• *-w7
SEyD^l^'
WHO CAME TO DINNER fU55.
9 Pete Smith Novelt*
HOME 1*3?.c8s;™e
9AR y_GR ANTantl JOAN FONT A INTI
i ni>irS'5ISI£JON At 615. 0:3i,
LUPE VELEZ and LEO CARRTT T.r»
m " MEXICAN SPITFIRES BABY^
SAVOY 303%4:h^NW_“
E^iJSON in MR DISTRICT
SECO^n-.?,oA"p^l"
herW™1 GA5SAN and IRENE
HERVEY in BOMBAY CLIPPER"
At n:l5. MO. 14» in MARJORTTC
W’vC??pw?RTH find TOM BROWN m
NIAGARA F^ALUS _At 7:10. t*:2ti,
TAKOMA 4,h * ■*“*™*~s»a r
infturmr,t 4112. Parking Spare
BETTE DAVIS. ANN SHERIDAN »rd
MONTY WOOLLEY in THE MAN
WHO CAME TO DINNER " At “s-h
9:15. Pete Smith_Novelty.
YORK G*' Are. A Quebec^ PL N.W7
V RA. 4 1O0
WALTER BRENNAN and WALTER
?0Sn5:SSnW“'^
THE VILLAGE £°7 %L
Phone Mich. 0237
“BALL OF FIRE,”
BARBARA STANWYCK.
GARY COOPER
NEWTON ‘’‘VM***"
Phone Mich. 18.70.
“HOW GREEN WAS MY
VALLEY,”
WALTER PIDGEON.
_ MAUREEN_O'HARA ^
JESSE THEATER Zi
Phone mTp ftHfil.
Double Feature
“YOU’RE IN THE ARMY
NOW,”
•HMMY nURANTE. JANE WYMAN.
“THE GAY FALCON,”
GEORGE SANDERS.
_WENDY_BARRIE_
SYLVAN 1,4 s‘ *"< *■ l
Ullavnn A„. N.W.
Phone NOrlh 0689
‘ H. M. PULHAM, ESQ "
ROBERT YOUNG. HEDY LAMARR.
TONIOHT'^^“.np_ .TARGET FOR
TONIjjHT. The R. A. F. in Action
pVEHNON
One Block from Presidential Gardeni
Phone Alex. If If.
Free Parkin* in Rear of Theater.
“SKYLARK,”
CLAUDETTE COLBERT.
_ , RAY MILLAND.
Bncctal Added Attraction—"TARGET
FOR TONIGHT." The R. A. F in
Action
Palm Mt- v,rn°n
r nil FI Alei., Va. ALeg. 0167.
ROBERT PRESTON and
NANCY KELLY ln
“Parachute Battalion.”
RISER BETHESDA
Bethesda, Md *
WI*. 4818. BRad. OIOS.
At 6, 8 and 9:55 P.M.
WALT DISNEY’S “DUMBO,”
in Technicolor!
(comlnt W(d8Md.r_-BOW GREEN WAS
MY VALLEY. 1
ALEXANDRIA, ?AT
prrn free parking.
niaXail_ Phone Ale*. 34 IS.
CLAUDETTE COLBERT. JOHN PAYNE In
"REMEMBER THE DAY."_
nirilMnilTl Perfert Sound
nilennunu Phone Ale*. »•»"«
ANNE SHIRLEY RAY BOLGER in FOUR
JACKS AND A JILL.

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