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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 08, 1942, Image 21

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1942-05-08/ed-1/seq-21/

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Forced Saving Seen
As Alternative to
Voluntary Plan
Demand of Treasury
Involves No Hardship,
Banker Declares
By tby Associated Press.
NEW YORK. May 8 —Some form
of forced savings Is the forbidding
alternative to voluntary and Inde
pendent war saving, Preaident Levi
P. Smith of the Burlington (Vt.)
Savings Bank declared today.
“Fortunately, we have a record
national income which makes vol
untary saving possible," Mr. Smith
told the annual conference of the
National Association of Mutual
Savings Banks on being elected
president of that body.
“Greatly Increased saving by the
enlistment of a part of every pay
envelope and salary check must be
the keynote of our new national
economy,” he said. “It Is lndispen
sible that as much as 10 per cent of
Individual Incomes be devoted to the
purchase of War savings bonds.
Banks Are Praised.
"This demand of the Treasury in
volves no hardship in view of what
Is at stake. Mutual savings banks
of the country, as the time-honored
missionaries of thrift, have done
well to assume leadership in the
furtherance of this program.”
Declaring that making thrift
America's prevailing purpose by
converting all surplus earnings into
War savings bonds would put brakes
upon the high cost of living, Smith
said. “Money channeled back into
the war effort is kept out of the
commodity market and thus reduces
the amount of crazy money which
otherwise would foster competition
for every-day goods and produce an
ascending .spiral of prices.”
"Before every other considera
tion,” he asserted, “we have got to
win this war, and it is the American
pay envelopes that will do the job.”
Housing Job Outlined.
The task of providing for 500.000
to 750.000 war industry workers
throughout the Nation was outlined
by John B. Blandford, jr., admin
istrator of the National Housing Au
thority, who spoke at the final ses
sion.
He said 385,000 publicly financed
war houses would be built or pro
jected before the end of the year.
In addition to this program, he
■aid, 75,000 two-person family dwell
ings, known as “dormitory apart
ments,” would probably be part of
the program. Also, 100,000 dormi
tories for single persons, in addition
to the 40.000 such buildings either
now completed or planned, would be
necessary, he said.
He predicted also that about 19,
000 trailers would either be provided
or planned for before the end of the
year.
Blandford foresaw no shortage of
lumber, but said that a shortage of
skilled labor and transportation for
materials might arise.
Coca-Cola Plea
For Rehearing
Is Rejected
By the Associated Press.
WILMINGTON, Del.. May
Coca-Cola Co. has been denied re
hearing in a suit to restrain the
Nehl Corp. from the use of the word i
•‘cola.”
Chancellor W. W. Harrington dis
missed the plea for injunction
April 1.
Rehearing was asked on a claim
that the chancellor had “overlooked
inadvertently” certain provisions of
ft 1923 contract between Coca-Cola
and the Chero-Cola Co., named a*
predecessor to the Nehi Corp. The
denial was filed yesterday.
Washington Produce
BUTTER—93 score, tubs. 41'.4; 1-pound
prints. 42, > 4-pound prints. 42Vs. 92 score,
tube. 40: 1-pound prints. 40V, ‘/4-pound
prints. 41: 91 score, tubs. 3PJ«: 1-pound
prints. 4014: '4-pound prints 40V»; 90
score, tubs. 30'/4: 1-pound prints. 40; V«
pound prints. 40's: 89 score, tubs. 39;
i-pound prints. 30‘s: V«-pound prints.
40; IS score, tubs. 38 V«: l-pound prints.
II-4: V4-Pound prints. 39V«.
LIVESTOCK—Calves, 14; sprlns
lsmbs. 14
Prom Agricultural Marketing Adminis
tration. Prices paid net f.o.b. Washington:
BOGS—Market firm. Prices paid for
Pedtral-Btate traded eggs received from
grading stations (May 8): Whites. U. §
extras, large. 82-36: mostly 32; U. 8
extras, medium. 29-31; mostly 29; U. 6.
standards, large. 30-32: mostly 88; 0. 8
standards, medium. 3Q-30H. mostly 30: U.
S. trades. 26-27. mostly 27. Browns, U. 8.
extras, large. 31-33: mostly 32: U. 8 ex
tras. medium. 28-30. mostly 28: u. 8.
standards, large. 30-31, mostly 30; U. 8.
standards, medium. 27V4-29. mostly 27Vj;
U. S. trades. 26. Nearby ungraded eggs:
Currant receipts, whites. 27-28: blxed col
ors. 26-27. Receipts Government graded
exta. 817 cases.
LIVE POULTRY—Market firm rowl,
colored. 4 pounds and up. 21; Leghorn
hens, HVk pounds and up. 16-18: No 2a.
10-12. Roosters, 14-16. Chickens. Dela
ware and Maryland. Rocks and crosses,
broilers and fryers, all stses. 20-21; mostly
20; No. 2s. 12-13; Reds. 18-10. Turkeys,
eld toms, 18: old hens. 20-21.
Commodity Prices
NEW YORK, May 8 —The Associated
Press weighted wholesale price index of
36 commodities today advanced to 89 72,
new 1942 high
Previous day 88.66. week sio. 88.OR;
month ago. 88 27. year ago. 83.60
1842 1841 1840 1933-30.
High 98 72 95 12 78.25 98,14
Low 05 54 77 03 88 88 4144
11026 average eousis 100 >
Stock Averages
30 15 15 50
Indus. Ralls Util Stks.
Net change -t-.l —.1 unc. unc.
Todav. Close 48.5 15.4 22.8 33.8
Prev. day.. 48.4 15.5 22.8 33.8
Month ago 49.2 15 8 22.7 34.2
Year ago .. 55.8 17.8 30.4 39.8
1942 high.. 56.0 17.6 27.3 38.7
1942 low ... 46.0 14.7 21.1 32.0
1941 high.. 63.9 19.0 35.5 45.0
1941 low... 51.7 13.4 24.5 35,4
68-Stock Range Since 1927:
193S-40. 1932-37. 1927-J9
High ... 54.7 75.3 157.7
Low .... 33.7 16.9 61.8
(Compiled by the Associated Press.)
Bond Averages
SO 10 10 10
Riila. Induit. Util. T»n.
Net change. +.1 unc. —.3 unc.
Today, close 64.9103.6 942 47.7
Prev. day.. 64.8 103.6 94.5 47.7
Month ago. 64.9 103.3 94 7 45.6
Year ago... 662 104,6 101.2 43.6
1942 high.. 65.6 103.6 100.6 482
1942 low... 60.8 102.0 93.6 41.5
1941 high.. 66.5 105.4 102.2 51.4
1941 low... 58.3 102.9 98.9 38.0
II Low-Yield Bonds.
Close-111.9 Prev. day. 111.9
M'nth ago 1122 Year ago. 112.9
1942 high. 113.1 1942 low.. 111.7
1941 high. 115.1 1941 low.. 112.1
(Ceaio»*4 AMosltUd Pr—«.)
NEW YORK CURB MARKET
Cjk/aml#£ Private Wirt
JlOCKS Direct ta Tha Star
stoci aad mu
Dividend Rate. Add 00. Hlehiow. Cloae.
Alum Co ot Am la.. 160a 84 84 84
Alum Co pf (8) 460a 1004 100 1004
Aluminum Ltd (h8) 350s 78 774 78
Am Cmamld (B).OO 12 294 284—89
Am Oas *B1.80s 7 V64 184 164
Am O A 1 pf (4.76) 26f 904 904 904
AmLt ATrse 1.20. 2 9 9 9
Am Seal-Sap .24*.. 1 14 14 14
Anchor Poit Fence.. 1 24 24 24
Atl Coast L2.50(... 26a 234 234 234
Automat Prod — ’ 8 24 24 24
Auto ▼ Meh .60*- 1 34 34 34
Azton-Plaber (A)... 20a 214 214 214
Babcock 4k WU .50#. 6 21 21 21
Baldwin Loco war.. 8 24 24 24
Beaunlt Mills .25e_. 1 84 84 84
Beech Aircraft_ 1 74 74 74
Blumenthal (8)_ 1 44 44 44
Bowman BUt 1st_ 1 14 14 14
Brewster A <.30«>_ 13 6 44 5
Brldaept Mach of_ 10s 584 584 584
Brllla Mfc Ca .60e_. 2 124 124 124
BN AIPpf (1.60) 8 124 12 124
Calif Bee Power_ 1 14 14 14
Can Col Alrwayi . _ 4 3 3 3
Cent Hudson O ,34s. 16 6 6
Cent Me P pf (7) .. 10a 904 904 904
CentNTPwpI (6). 230a 764 76 764
Ceasna Aircraft la.. 1 94 94 94
Chesebro (4a).. . 50a 734 734 734
Chlcaeo Rivet ,126a. 26a 64 54 64
Child! pf ..- 25s 11 11 11
Cities Semes— . 4 24 24 24
City Auto 8tpc (.60) 3 44 44 44
Clayton A Lam .86c 16 5 6
ColFuol A1 war... 6 14 14 14
ColO Alpf (6)_ 10a 214 214 214
CommuaP8(2>_60a 14 14 14
Oonn Tel Alice_ 23 IS IS IS
Consol Oss A Bee
Bel pf B (4.50) 440s 108 107S 108
Consol Gas A Bee
Bal pf C (4) 270* 100 100 100
Cont Roll A Stl .50* 2 10’S 10S 10S
Cooper-Bess Stl.60*. 1 fit* 6S 6S
creole Petrol 50a - 1 12S 1274 1274
Darby Petrolm .25*. 1 5S 5S 6S
Dayton Rubber ,50a 100* 8 8 8
Eagle Pitcher L .10# 2 7 7 7
East GAP 6pf 1.60k 200a 20S 20S 20S
B G A P pr of (4.50) 76a 43 42S 42S
Easy Wash B .878*. 2 2S 2S 2S
Bee Bond A Share- 4 1 1 1
Bee B A S pf (6>... 6 48 48 48
BmpGAFfl^pf.- 20a 98 98 98
XmpO AF7* pf„ 126» 103 101 103
BnpQ AF8% Pf— 175a 110 107S 110
Bauity S3 pf 1.60*.. 60a 13S 13S 13S
Eversharp Inc___ 1 2S 2S 2S
Fairchild At 1.25*.. 2 81% 8S 8V.
Palrehlld E A A_ 1 IS IS IS
Ford Ltd .064*_ 4 IS IS IS
Gen Fireproof .25e. 1 13S 13S 13S
Oen OaaAX ct pf B. 10a 76 78 76
Gen Share pf <8d).. 230* 39H 89 39S
Gen T A R pf A («>. 20* 100 100 100
Gilbert pf (3.50)—. 210a 42 42 42
Gorham Mfile-850a 26S 25 25
Great AAP n-T Se.. 25a 64 64 64
OulfOUUa)_ 3 27S 2714 27S
Heel* Minin* .25*.. 8 414 4 4
Heyden Chem (8)_ 25a 67s 67S 67S
Humble 011 .876*—. 4 BIS 51 BIS
111 low* pf .80k_ 1 20 20 20
IniCo N A <2 60a). 150* 5814 6814 68S
Int Hydro Bee pf_— 1 IS IS IS
tnt Patrol (hi i _ 1 914 9<4 914
Intarat Bom* (.80>_ 18 6 5S 5S
JaeobaCo ... 1 2S 2S 2S
JerCPALpf 5.50. 25* 61 61 61
Klein (DE)(1) ... 1 11S US US
Lake Shore M h.80 . 4 5S , 5S 6H
Lehlih Coal (.050. 1 4S 4S 4S
Lin* Material .50a.. 220a 6S 5S 6S
Lone Star Oaa .20*. . 4 61% . 6V4 6H
Lon* 1*1 Llfht pf B-. 60* ' IBS 15* 15*
Loudon Packlne 2 2 114 2
Louis Pwr it Lt pi 6 40s 9714 971* 9714
Me Wiliams D .2 5e 1 71* 714 714*
Merr-Ch-8 pi 2.50k 275s 11014 110 11014
Middle State Pet
Avte.Sle.__ 4 2T4 214 214
Middle Wait C .40*. 2 314 314 814
Midvale Steel .60e._ 25a 26 25 25
Midwest Pip 8,60a. 100a 1414 1414 1414
Moat Ward A (7)„. 60s 15614 15614 16614
Mount Prod (.60) . 2 444 444 494
Murray (Ohio) .60*. 1 714 714 714
Nat Container ,25e. 1 814 814 814
Nat Rubber J5e_ 1 6% 694 6*4
Nat Sucar Rcfln 4.. 14 914 9 914
New Xng T*T 1.75* 60a 8614 8614 8614
N J Zlne 1.50*. 100a 6114 611* 6114
Nias Hud Pwr- 11 114 194 114
NiasBMdB (.20«)_ 2 2H 2*4 2H
NUes-Bem-P .25*— 2 1014 1014 1014
Forged Cylinder Head
To Speed Production
Of Plane Engines
Wright Aeronautical
To Save Both Time
And Materials
By th* Associated Press.
NEW YORK, May 8.—Develop
ment of a forged cylinder head for
combat aircraft engines which will
mean a considerable saving In man
hours, war materials and essential
plant equipment was announced
yesterday by Myron B. Gordon, vice
president and general manager of
the Wright Aeronautical Corp.
Perfected after more than five
years of research and soon to be put
into mass production, the new head
will step up speed, altitude, load and
range of Allied warplanes, giving an
engine a 12 to 15 per cent increase
in power output without increase in
weight.
The forged head, developed under
the direct supervision of Perry W.
Brown, is lighter than the cast head
now in use and provides a service
engine weighing less than one pound
per horsepower. In tests, the forged
heads also have withstood hydraulic
pressure 100 per cent greater than
the maximum for cast heads.
In addition, Gordon announced,
"revolutionary manufacturing tech
niques speed up the fabrication of
heads, conserve man hours by effect
ing a 40 per cent saving In material
rejections and leave much-needed
drop hammers (nine drop hammer
operations are eliminated) as well
as foundry equipment free to turn
out other parts ”
The new process will be made
available to all other aircraft engine
manufacturers as a further aid in
the all-out war effort.
Steel Pipe Eliminated.
SPRINGFIELD. 111., May 8 UP.—
A new method of eliminating steel
pipe in oil well casing by substituting
pipe made of molded wood fiber was
proved successful In a Southern
Illinois test. Dr. M. M. Leighton,
chief of the Illinois Geological Sur
vey. announced.
Dr. Leighton, pointing out that
oil well drilling has been curtailed
because of the wartime steel short
age. said the new method "may
prove to be of great importance to
the oil industry” by permitting a
greater number of drilling opera
tions. He said the fiber pipe mate
rial Is available In unlimited quan
tities at only a fraction of the cost
of steel pipe.
The wood fiber casing proved suc
cessful, Dr. Leighton reported, In a
test conducted April 28 at a shallow
well belonging to the Dinsmoor Oil
Co. TTie operation in the 460-foot
drill hole was completed in 12 hours.
The originator of the process Is
Frederick Squires of Champaign,
petroleum engineer for the State
Oeological Survey, who said the new
; process was practical in any field
where the well was being drilled to
one stratum. Further experimenta
tion Is needed, he said, to determine
if a method can be devised to pre
vent crushing of the wooden pipe
when it has to penetrate one or more
sands.
■toe* sod HIM
Dividend Rate. Add 00. nchXow. Osh.
Ror An LHP »i- 26a 64 64 64
Novadel-A* (*>- 1 1J 13 13
Ohio Pvrr of (6.60). 20* 103V* 103V* 1034
Okla Rat O (1.40).. 1 13 13 13
PacOatOsf 1.60_ 1 264 264 264
Pantepee Oil- 12 34 84 84
Pennroad .35a- 22 24 24 24
Pa-Oent Airline*— 1 64 #4 64
Penn Salt 2*- 25e 130 130 130
Phoenix Seeur- 8 44 44 44
Phoenix See pf (3). 350i 344 344 344
Pltney-Bowei .40... 2 44 44 44
Pitta A Lake E 6c 100a 644 544 644
PowdrellAAlex .15*. 1 44 44 44
Pu* S'd 85 pf 3.50k. 225s 984 974 974
Pueet Sd P SS of_ 425a 474 46 46
Pu* Sd Pulp (2)- 3 124 124 124
Quaker Ott* 4- 40a 69 68 69
Reed Roll Bl* .... 1 16 16 16
Ryan Aeronau .26*.. 1 34 3 4 34
RepubUe Aviation.. 2 34 34 34
St Reels Paper- 1 14 14 14
St Reds P pf- 25* 109 109 109
Selected Indus ev pf. 10s 14 14 14
Shattuck-D .35*... 2 2 4 2 4 24
Shtrw w pf 6. 20« 112% 112% 112%
Singer Mfc <6a>_— 60*140 138 140
8 C Bd of B 1.80- 3 25% 25% 26%
Stand Oil By 1- 1 10% 10% 10%
Stand Product! ,25a 1 6% 6% 6%
Stand SUSP 1.601- l 17% 17% 17%
8tataon J B-126a 2% 2% 2%
Technicolor 26*_ 1 7% 7% 7%
Tob & All 8 3.85*-_ 10* 43 43 43
Tranawett Oil- 8 8% 3% 3%
Udxllte .16*- 6 2% 2% 2%
Union Oat Can .80- 2 6% 6% 6%
United Oae pf 4.50k 200a 103 102% 102%
Utd U * Pwr pf . 3 14 14 14
Unit Shot 612.60a.. 100a 64 63 64
USAlntSpf 8.76f.. 175i 44% 43 43%
U S Line* pf .70_ 2 6% 6% 6%
Un:v Corn vtc 2 6% 6% 6%
Util Equity »f 2.50* 50a 34% 34% 34%
Valspar pf 2g - 25a 13% 13% 13%
Vogt Mfg (,80a)_ 1 7% 7% 7%
Wellington Oil — 13 3 3
W Va Coal St C .25#. 1 3% 3% 3%
Wright H lb.40ai 2 1% 1% 1%
s Unit of trading, 10 shares, r In bank
ruptcy or receivership or being reorganlged
under Bankruptcy Act. or securities as
sumed by such companies. Ratee of divi
dends In the foregoing table are annual
disbursements based on tha last quarterly
or semi-annual declaration. Unless other
wise noted, special or extra dividends are
not Included. xd Bx dividend. xr Bx
rights, a Also extra or extras, d Cash or
stock, e Declared or paid so far this year,
f Payable In stock c Paid last year, h Pay
able In Canadian funds, k Accumulated
divldendi paid of declared this year.
Bonds
DOMESTIC— High. Low Clow.
Am G A E 2%a BO 102% 102% 102%
Am O A E 3%s 70— 103 102% 103
Am P A L 6s 2016_ S3 92% 93
As El Ind 4%i 53_ 42% 42% 42%
As O A E 4%s 49_ 9% 9% 9%
As O A E 5s 60_ 9% 9% 9%
As Q A E 5s 68_ 9% 9V, 9%
Assoc G&E 5s 68 rg._ 9% 9% 9%
As T A T 5%l 55 A... 62 81 % 61%
Bald Loco 6s 60_109% 109 109
Bell Te C 5s 57 B_114 114 114
Blrm E 4'js 68 _ 102 102 102
Bost Ed 2%s 70 A_101% 101% 101%
Can Pac fls 42_ 135 135 135
Cent St El 6s 48_ 6% 5 5Vs
Chi Rys 5s 27 cod_ 64% 64% 64%
Cities Service 5i 50_ 78% 76% 75%
Cities Service 5s 58 ... 77 77 77
Cit S PAL 5%S 52... 72% 72 72%
Cit 8 PAL 5%s 49 ... 72% 72 72
Comunty PAL 5s 67... 101 % 101 Vi 101 %
Conn LAP 7s 51 A... 122 122 122
Cons GELAP 3s 69 ... 106 106 106
Cudahy Pkg 3%s 55 —. 101% 101% 101 %
East G A P 4s 56 A ._ 82% 81% 81%
El Pw A Lt 5s 2030 . 76 76 76
Florida PAL 5s 64 . 103% 103 103
Gatineau P 3%s 69 86% 86% 86%
Gen W WAE 5s 43 A.. 99% 99% 99%
Georgia PAL 5a 78 .. 86 85% 85%
Glen Alden Cl 4s 65 . 90% 90% 90%
Guard Inv 5s 48 A — 14% 14% 14%
Hygrade Fd 6« 49 A... 83% 83% 83%
Idaho Pwr 3%» 67 ... 110% 110% 110%
111 Pw A Lt 5%s 67— 91% 91% 91%
111 PwrALt 6s 53 A_101% 101 101%
111 Pw A L 5s 66 C_ 95 95 96
Indiana Svc 6a 50 A— 76% 76% 76%
Indianap Os 5s 62_112% 112% 112%
Intern Pw Be 57.. .. 71% 71 71%
Jert C PAL 3%s 66— 106% 106 106%
Mencel Co 4%s 47_ 100 100 100
Mldlan VRR bt 43— fli 60% 81
MU (McE 4%s 67_106% 105 105%
Minn PAL 4%s 78_102% 102% 102%
Minn P A L 6s 56_105% 106% 105%
Nebr Pwr 4%s 81-110% 110% 110%
Nerad Cal E 5a 56_ 94 94 94
New X Oft* »s 47_45% 46% 45%
New E Sak 5s 50_ 46 45 45
New * *2.6%* 54 -- 72% 72% 92%
New Or PS 6s 49 A.— 104% 104% 104%
N A LAP 5%s 68 A— 100% 100% 100%
No Con U 6%i 46 A_64% 64% 54^
Pec P A L 6s AS _ 00% 00% 00%
Penn C PAL 6s 79_105% 106% 106%
Pub Sve Ind 4a 60_107% 107% 107%
Pub % Goto 3%s 64... 107 107 107
PU S PAL 4%a 40 A 101% 101 % 101%
Pu 8 PAL 5s 60 C 10O% 100% 100%
Pu 8 PAL 4%s 50 D_ 96 08 96
2S*e 4%» 70 ... 110% 110% 110%
Sw WAP 4%e 87 A_ 04 03% 04
South Cel ti 3s 86_100% 100% 100%
Std OAE 8s 48 st _ 56 54% 66
Std OAE 6s 48 ct st... 65 54% &6
Std OaaAEl 6s 51 A... 65% 54% 64%
Std Oas A El 6s 57_ 66 56 55
Std OasAEl 6# 66 B_ 55 65 55
Stand PWALt 6s 57--- 54% 54% 54%
T»W Bee 6» 60 _106% 106% 108%
Tex Pw & L 6s 68_107% 107% 107%
Tide Wet P 5s 79 A_01% 01% 91%
Tol Edison 3%s 88 ... 106% 106% 106%
Twin C RT 6'is 52 A.. 79% 70V. 70V.
Unit LtAPW 5'.is 59 _ . 105% 105% 105%
Unit LAR D 6%s 62-. 02 % 92V* 02%
Utah PAL 4%s 44 ... 96 05 05
W»Jd Alt Hot 6i 54 .. J% V/t H
Wash Wa P 3%» 64.. 108% 108% 10R<%
West News U 6s 44 ... 77 76% 77
Westn N Un Bs 44 67 BBVi B7
W¥oREION 2030_10O 100 100
Cauca Val 7s 48_ 13 13 13
Danish Con 5s 53_ 22 22 22
Medetln Col 7* 51 ... 13 13 13
Rio de Jen 6%s 60 .. 14% 14% 14*.
ww—With warrants, xw—Without war
rants. n—New. st (stp)—Stamped.
Dividends Announced
NSW YORK. Mar Dividend* de
clared:
Pe- Stock of Pay
Rate rlod. record, able.
Itdifmd
Lane Well*_ J5e 6-16 6-1
Ne Action.
Crown Cork A Seal _ _ _
. . Resale r.
Atlas Powder -.76c 6-29 6-ln
Champ Pap A Fibr* . 26c Q 6-12 6-30
Chain Belt 25c 5-11 6-25
Curtis Wright A... *1.00 Q 6-16 6-30
Devoe ft Rgy'd A ft B.25c Q 6-20 6-1
Krest 8 H ft Co -40c 5-20 6-18
Harbison-Walker Refr. 25c A 6-11 6-1
111 Zinc ... 25c 6-11 5-25
Ingeraoll Rand *1.60-. 6-11 6-1
Kayser, Julius A Co--.25e 5-11 6-25
Parker Ruet Proof_25c Q 5-11 6-1
Savage Arm* corp ..50c 5-11 8-21
Sears Roebuck ft Co..75c Q 5-11 6-10
Texas pacific C A O-_.10e 0 6-11 6-1
Crown Cork ft Seal
$2.26 Df -66V. Q 6-29 6-15
Inter Products _25c .. 6-16 6-1
Nat'l Container_S5e 8-20 i-15
Foreign Exchange
NSW YORK. May 8 iJTi.—Ute foreign
exchange rates follow (Orest Britain In
dollars, others In cents):
Canada,
Official Canadian Control Board ratei for
United States dollars: Burins. 10 per cent
premium: selling. 11 per cent premium;
equivalent to discounts on Canadian dol
lars in New York of. buying, 9.91 per cent:
selling. 9 09 per cent. Canadian dollar in
New York open market. 1111 per cent dis
count, or 88.18*« United State* cents.
F.aroPe.
Ore** Britain, official (Bankers’ Foreign
Exchange Committee rates), buying. 4 02: i
selling. 4 04. open market: cables. 4.04.
Latin America.
Argentina, official. 29.77: free 23.65.
down 04 cent. Brasil, offlclel, 6.05n; free,
5.20n: Mexico. 20.67n
Rates in spot cables unless otherwise
Indicated, n Nominal.
__ ___
Baltimore Livestock
BALTIMORE, May 8 'Pi (United State!
Department of Agriculture):
Cattle—28. Steers nominal: few eows
and bulla steady, medium-trade eausewe
bulls. 10.00-25: eanner. cutter and com
mon-trade eows. 6.50-9.00
Calves—28. Steady: one lot choice
trade vealers. 15.50: small lots medium
trade vealer!, 13.00-14.26.
Hots—850. Steady with Thursday:
practical top. 14 40. good and cholee 180
210 pounds. 14.15-40; 160-180 pounds
and 220-240 pounds, 13.95-14.20: 240-260
pounds, 13.70-95: 140-160 pounds. 13 55
80; 260-300 pounds. 13.80-75: 130-140
pounds, 13.18-40; 120-130 pounds. 13.06
30: packing sows, 12.60-13.10.
Sheep—50. Nominal.
Baltimore Stocks
Special Dispatch to The Star.
BALTIMORE, May
Sales. STOCKS. High. Lew. Close
13^ Arundel Corn_ 14V«
1000 Bal Transit pf .- 6"
10 Congol Row pf 100
10 Fidelity A Dapoalt 112
11 Beab'rd Coml com i
Aft U S Fidel ft Ouar
62 West Natl Bank
( BONDS.
S800O Balto Tr db 4* A 56 V«
15000 Balto Tr 6s A 66
Odd-Lot Dealings
PHIi-ADKLFHIlA. Mar 8 OP.—The Se
curities Commission reported today these
! transactions by customers with odd-lot
' dealers or specialists on the New York
; Stock Exchange for May 7: 1.620 pur
chaaea involving 40.090 shares: 1.754 Mies
involving 42.849 shares, including 36 short
sales involving 1.066 shares.
Stock Seat Up $2,000
NEW YORK. May S OP)—A New
York Stock Exchange test wss sold
today for $30,000. up $3,000 from the
last prevtou* sale.
Retail Trade Holds
Only Slight Gain
Over Year Ago
Buyers Concentrate
On Seasonal Lines
Backed by Promotions
B» the Associated Press.
NEW YORK. May 8 — Retail sales
during the past week barely main
tained a margin over a year ago,
Dun & Bradstreet reported today,
pointing out that buyers concen
trated heavily in seasonal lines
backed by promotional activity.
"Reports from various parts of
the country Indicated that there
was some difference of opinion
among retailers this week over the
effect of the Impending price ceil
ing on consumer demand,” it said in
a trade review.
"Some merchants ascribed a
slackening of buying interest in a
number of staples to the decline of
price anticipatory buying.”
“Store advertising activity gave
major stress to Mother's Day pur
chases and to May sales of house
accessories,” It continued. “Some
stores took space to announce that
prices had already been adjusted to
the ceilings established by the gen
eral regulation, although the effect
ive date of the order was set at May
18. Conservation ads, rapidly in
creasing in number, put special em
phasis on moth preventives, ward
robe closets, cleaning accessories,
and fur storage."
The survey showed gifts, house
hold items and garden implements
sold briskly. Furniture sales were
off slightly although bedding and
upholstery goods sold well.
Sales figures showed a dollar
volume for the country as a whole
ran less than 5 per cent ahead of a
year ago. Percentage sales Increases
in major regions were New England,
3 to 5, East and Southwest, 1 or 2;
South, 4 to 7; Middle West, 2 to 8;
Pacific Coast, 2 to 4, and North
west, off 1 to 3.
Wholesale business, while sub
stantial, reflected the hesitation
that followed the general price ceil
ing order. Buyers continued to ask
as much merchandise as mills would
accept In some lines.
Seasonal goods were slow, pending
clarification of the Government or
der’s effect on prices of seasonal
merchandise.
I
Washington Exchange
SALES.
Peoples Drug Stores common—80
at 19»*.
Mergen thaler Linotype—10 at 33.
BONDS
PUBLIC UTIUTT
Am TAT eonv deb Si IMS 108V« *107 vi
AaecoetU a Pot 5t 194# .! 106 108
An* A Pot lutr Si 1940.. 112 _
Ana A Pot mad 34«» 1961. 106 V4
£» Traction let fts 1947.. 104V4 105'4
City a Suburban 6« 1948.. 106
City A Sub mod 3V«e 1961. lOJVi
ii ii|^
MISCBLLANBOUS.
Tar Riaw Co let 4Via 1948 102 Vi _
STOCKS
PUBLIC UTIUTT.
Amer TelA Tel (9) -nA, A,kea
Capital Tranalt (a.SO)_ 19% *2
N A W Steamboat (t4)_100 lifi
Pot Bee Power 0% pfd (6) . ill r .
Pot Bn Pw 5%% pfd (6.60) 113%
Wash Ota Lt common (1.60) 14% 16
Wash Oat Ltpfd (4.80) .. *90 96
Waih Ry ft ■ eom <|40).. 470 850
Wash Ry k XI pfd (5)_109 114
BANK AND TRUST COMPANY.
Amer Sec A Tr Co <e8)_186
Bank of Betheada (t.7B)_ SO _
Capital (t«> _ 176
corn ft BiTlon (710.00)_325
Liberty <t8).172 500
Lincoln (h8) _ __ 210
Natl 8av A Tr (t4.ooi__ 202
Pr Oeorees Bk * Tr (tl.OO) 20% 24
Riees felO) .._ 255 2TO
Riats ofd (5) _ 101 104
Washington <6) loo
Wash Loan A Tr (e8> _ _ 203 __I
FIRE INSURANCE
American ( + 6) 126
Firemen’s (1.40) II "
National Union (.76) _ 13% _II
TITLE INSURANCE
Columbia (k.80) _ 13 16
Real Estate <m6) _168 186
MISCELLANEOUS.
Carpel Corp (2.00) 30 -
Oarflnckel eom (<70) 7% 9
Oarflnck H% eu e» pf (1 60) 23 26
Lanaten Monotype (1.00).. 23
Lincoln Serv eom (1.26) 16 16
Line Serv 7% or pfd (3.60). 35 42
Mertenthaler Lino (al.00). 32% 34
Natl Mtaa A Inv pfd (.40). 4%
Peoples Dr com new (1 60). 19 21
Real Est M k O Pfd ttAO). 7%
Security Storage (t4>. ... «6
Ter Ref ft Wh Corp (3) . 60 82
Wdwd A Loth eom (p2.30). 30 35
Wdwd ft Loth pfd (7)_120 125
* Ex dividend. t Plue extras. a Paid
so far this year. (e> 2% extra, a *6 00
axtra paid December 29. 1941. n 36.oo
extra, k 20c extra, m 31.50 extra, (pj
Paid in 1941. <y) J10.00 txtra.
Chicago Livestock
CHICAGO. May 8 UP, (United States De
partment of Agriculture).—Salable hogs.
0.000: total, 10,000; generally steady with
Thursday’s average; practical top. 14.10;
few head. 14.16: bulk good and choice
180-330 pounds. 13 00-14.10; most 180-8(1
pounds. 13.50-14.00; cood 400-650-pound
sows, largely 13 50-75; few lighter weights
to 13.00.
Salable sheep. 8.000; total. 8.600: late 1
Thursday; Fat shorn and wooled lambs.
26-50 higher: fat sheep strong to 25
higher; few decks choice 0O-l()O-pound fed
wooled lambs, 15.00-20; others, 14.85 ip
best 105-round clippers. 13.25: bulk all
weights. 12.75-13.10: today's trade: Few
early sales fed shorn lams with No. l and
No. 3 pelts. 13.36. fully steady; most bids
on wool skins unevenly lower or 15.00
down clean-up sales fat shorn ewes steady
st 8.75, down, with odd-head light-weight
wool skins. 8.00-60.
Salable cattle. l.OOO: calves. 400: gen
erally steady market: little beef in croD:
scarcity today and earlier In week main
stimulating factor in face of dull under
tone: most medium to good gteers snd
yearlings. 11.75-13.25; best available.
13.MO: trade expecting increased receipts
next week: killers anticipating further de
cline to make dressed beef conform with
celling prices: today's limited supply
steers and heifers fairly well cleaned up;
best heifers. 13.25; cows very scarce,
steady but slow; cutters. 8.75 down; most
beef cows. 0 00-75 with good kinds ab
sent: outside on weighty sausage bulls.
10.50: veators steady at 15.00 down: very
few 15.50; around 1,400 head strictly
sood and choice Southwest bred stock
calves and light, yearlings due here for
next week’s garly trade.
New York Produce
NEW YORK. May * (JP>.—Eggs. 18.735:
firmer. Mixed colors—Fancy to extra
fancy. 32-33V extra 31‘,-V traded
flritf. 30: current receipt*. 2**4-%: me- !
dOims 28^^ dirties, No. 1. 20; average |
C^W7i*ttes—-lobbing Bales of fancy to extra
fancy. 34-35V wholesale tales of fancy
to extra fancy. 31V4-33t4. Nearby and
Midwestern exchange specials, 31: nearby
and Midwestern atandarda. SO'/j-V Job
bing tales of exchange to fancy heavy
mediums. 32-33: wholesale salet of ex
change to fancy heavy mediums. 30-31 Vi.
Nearby and Mldweatern exchanta madtuma.
29'/«-V
Browns—Nearby and Midwestern, fancy
to extra fancy. 31-33V specials. 30V
standard*. 30V mediums. 2S.
Duck exts—30-33.
Butter. 598.790: steady. Creamery,
hither than 92 score and premium marks.
39V«-40H; 90 score (cash market), 30;
88-91 score. 37-38V
Cheese. 136.835; steady: prices un
changed.
Reduced Dividend
Hinted by Head of
Johns-Manville
Brown Reports Heavy
Taxes May Force
Cut in Payments
B) the Associated Pres*. *
NEW YORK, May 8—Lewis H.
Brown, president of Johns-Manville
Corp., told stockholders at the an*
nual meeting today the greatly In*
creased taxes in prospect meant that
all companies might have to reduce
payments to shareholders.
His statement was taken as a hint
the company might cut Its dividend
on common stock before the end of
the year, although Brown did not go
into further detail.
Mr. Brown said the company
would do a larger volume of business
this year than last, but added oper
ating profit probably would show
only a slight improvement because
of rising costs. He estimated 80 per
cent of output was essential to the
war effort
Stockholders approved a proposal
to retire 25,000 shares of cumulative
7 per cent preferred stock outstand
ing.
Treasury Bond
Sales Exceed
638 Millions
Br the Associated Press.
Sales of the new 24 per cent- j
20-25-year Treasury bonds totaled
$638,705,500 for the first three days,
the Treasury said today.
Wednesday sales amounted to
$105,000,000, Indicating that the
large subscriptions of the first two
days had far from exhausted the
money raising strength of this type
of Treasury campaign to sell bonds
to large investors.
Instead of limiting subscriptions
t& this issue for a limited time and
amount, the Treasury is taking all
offers for an indefinite period,
probably two weeks.
New York Cotton
B> tha Associated Press.
NEW YORK, May 8—Cotton
prices advanced to as much as 75
cents a bale, carrying the March de
livery up to within a few points of
the 13-year high established on
April 6.
A general buying movement and
a continuation of active trade price
fixing easily absorbed a swelling
volume of hedging and realizing.
Factors Influencing the demand in
cluded the Pacific war news, reports
that the C. C. C. May sales allot
ments might be postponed and farm
bloc contention that the present 110
per cent parity of price ceiling was
not enough.
Late prices were 40 to 70 cents a
bale higher. May, 19.38; July, 19.63,
and March, 20.19.
Futures closed 30 to 50 cent*
higher.
Open. Hith. Low.
May ... 10.24 10.40 19.28
July ... 10.62 10 86 19.50
Oct. ... 19.92 19.07 19.89
Dec. 20.03 20.09 20.01
Jan. 20 06 20.09 20.08
Mar. 20.17 20.21 20.14
MiddUna. spot, 21.16n, up
New Orleans Price*.
NEW ORLEANS. Mar 8 iJTi — Cotton
futures advanced here today an buyins
stimulated by abnormally low tempera
ture! in much of the belt and reports In
dicator an Important Allied victory in
the Far Pacific. The market closed steady,
9 to 11 points net hither.
Open. Hi eh. Low. Cloy;.
May.19.41 10.41 10.41 10.86b
July ... 19.67 10.70 10.63 10.66,
October . 20.18 20.21 20 12 30.15-18
December 20 29 20 31 20 24 20.28
January.. 20 32b 20.20b
March *0.4* 20.45 20.38 20.41
May 1943 20.56 30.55 20.50 30.61b
Spot cotton closed steady. 0 points
higher Sales. 546. Low middling. 16.78,
middllM. 20.06: good mlddlim, 20 51; re
ceipts. 1.835: stock. 470,924.
b Bid. n Nominal.
Short Interest Grows
Slightly in April
Br th* Associated Press.
NEW YORK, May 8—The New
York Stock Exchange reported today
that the short Interest, excluding
odd-lot accounts, existing as of April
30 amounted to 530,636 shares, com
pared with 513,546 shares March 31,
or an Increase of 17.090.
Total short interest in all odd-lot
dealers’ accounts was 66,323 shares
April 30. compared with 71,578 shares
March 31.
Issues in which a short Interest
was reported on April 30, exclusive
of odd-lot dealers’ short position,
totaled 438, against 424 on March 34.
Among short-interest totals were
American Telephone St Telegraph
issues at 11,423 April 30, as against
15,555 March 31, and General Mo
tors, 43,541 April 30, increased from
37,852 March 31.
Steel Ingot Output
Ahead of Year Ago
Bi tbc Associated Prsst.
NEW YORK, May 8.—Production
of 7,122,313 tons of steel ingots
and castings in April was announced
bv the American Iron St Steel In
stitute. This was slightly under the
record output of 7,392,911 tons in
the longer month of March, but
was 5 Vi per cent higher than pro
duction of 6,754,179 tons In April,
1941.
The total produced by American
mills in the first four months was
28,161.202 tons, against 27,030.888
tons in the like months of 1941.
The industry operated at an aver
age rate of 97.7 per cent of capacity
in April, compared with 98.2 in
March and 97.6 in April, last year.
Wholesale Commodity
Index Up Further
Bt tb< Associated Press.
The Labor Department’s com
modity price index rose 0.1 per cent
lest week to 98.7 per cent of the 1928
average, the highest level since late
in 1926. The index has risen 0.8
per cent since early in April and is
now 18.6 per cent higher than at
this time last year.
In May, 1929, the index level was
94.7. In the week ending May 1,
1937, it was 87.4.
The upward price movement of
last week was led by an advance of
0.3 per cent for foods. ^
United States Treasury Position
B> tbe Associated Pnss.
Th* position of th* Treasury May 4 compared with corresponding data a year ago:
May «■ 1042. May 8. 1841.
Receipts _ 844.S42.844.33 S3O.2O0.4ftO.O4
Expenditures _ 139.741.108.21 48.307.784.40
Net balance _ 2,924.707,384.02 2,320.107.084.12
Worklna balance Included - 2.182.874,221.31 1,580.278,736.49
Customs receipts for month- 8.583.114.75 8.857.054.38
Receipts fiscal yaar (July 1)_ 0,856,489.304.00 8,044,700,370.02
Bzpendtturaa fiscal yaar. 84.000.880.87704 10.ail.878.M1.7«
Excess of axpeadlturaa--- 14.840.801.071.04 4 337,004,102.74
diy::::::::::::::: ♦‘fMS i
Sold asset* _M.702.871.421 55 22.521.064.808.86
FORT CUSTER, MICH. — PIGTAILED ROOKIES —The beards
and braids of George Anderson, SI (left), and Francis Buck, 27,
presented a new problem for reception center authorities here.
The two rookies are from Michigan’s House of David and neither
ever visited a barber. —A. P. Wirephoto.
Silver Needs Boosted
a
Sharply by Use in
War Production
Arms Consumption
Equals Industrial
Total for W39
By GARETH MUCHMORE,
Associated Press Business Writer.
NEW YORK, May 8.—8ilver bul
lets In legend won the battle and
silver. In weapons of another form,
is helping America’s fighting men.
As much silver Is going Into
planes, tanks, ships, trucks, guns
and shells and their manufacture
this year as all United Statea In
dustry used In 1939, a reliable trade
source estimated today, placing the
figure at 30,000,000 ounces.
The substitution of silver for cop
per, nickel, tin, aluminum and other
I war-needed non-rusting metals by
civilian industry also has skyrock
eted demand from non-war manu
facturers.
The War Production Board, in
its order last week banning iron and
steel from more than 400 common
civlUaa articles, specifically per
mitted tiie use of silver, or of gold,
as a substitute.
American factories, a large bul
lion dealer estimated, could use 140,
000,000 ounces of silver profitably
this year at current prices—if they
could get It The total supply for
the year, however, was figured at
100,000,000 ounces.
Rationing Necessary.
This shortage of supply compared
with demand has made necessary,
trade report* said, an informal ra
tioning or doling out of silver to
users because it would be impossible
to supply the metal they want at
prevailing prices.
Paradoxically, the trade points
out, the United States Treasury owns
more than 3,000,000,000 ounces of
siver.
The catch, sUver men say, is a
three-way price policy, explained
this wty:
Foreign silver brings 35 cents an
ounce at the Treasury, and Industry
pays a fraction of a cent more to
obtain its requirements.
Domestic silver, under the law
passed July 6. 1939. must be bought
by the Treasury at 71.11 cent# an
ounce. Such purchases in 1941 were
estimated at about 70.000,000 ounces.
Under this law, the Treasury can
not sell that same domestically
mined silver for less than $1.29 an
ounce.
Thus foreign mined silver, mostly
from Canada. Mexico and South
America since the war disrupted
other trade routes, has been Amer
ican industry’s only major supply.
Federal price freezing, some sources
believe, might prevent industry
from offering more for silver in an
effort to encourage producers.
The growing demand has brought
discussion of ways by which the
Treasury could release some of its
silver as a “loan” to industry, to
be returned or replaced after copper
and such metals again become avail
able.
Power Loan Granted.
The Treasury agreed to loan 40,000
tons of silver to the power industry
for use in bus-bars, through which
electricity passes on its way from
generators to power lines. Now the
i talk has turned to loans for other
Industrial purposes.
The Treasury could “farm out” a
good deal of its silver, by the way,
without affecting the amount of sil
ver coin in circulation. It has on
! hand more than 480.000.000 silver
dollars and millions of dollars more
in subsidiary coin in its vaults.
Aside from coinage use. Handy St
Harman. New York bullion dealers,
estimate the United States used
nearly 80,000.000 ounces of silver in
1941, almost twice as much as In
1940, and credited the rise directly
and indirectly to the war. Use of the
white metal stiU is increasing.
Silver alloys have replaced brass
Mortgages
refinanced at
low interest^
See*-'
WEAVER
BROS inc
First
WAtMINtTSN BIMh RKTRIOT MM
ACALT0M 0IN0I laaa
(copper and zinc) in some articles.
Pure silver wire substitutes for
copper in some electrical appli
ances and small motors.
Silver plating puts a resistant sur
face on metals that otherwise might
rust or corrode.
Large quantities of silver have
been mixed with lead to substitute
for tin-lead solders.
War use of silver is chiefly in
the form of brazing alloys, while
compositions of it are used in mak
ing electrical contacts, and pure sil
ver is used in airplane bearings,
photographic film, surgical materials
and the like.
Silver men estimate 200 to 250 tons
of copper would provide all the
alloying metal needed to harden the
100,000.000-140,000,000 ounces of sil
ver needed for industrial use.
Chicago Produce
CHICAGO. May 8 !.4V—Butter, receipts.
962,580; Arm: creamery. 93 score. 38%
39: 92. 38: 90 centrallied carlots. 38;
other prices unchanted
Etas, receipts, 38.666: Arm: current
receipts. 28%; checks. 26%; other price*
unchanced
Poultry, lire. SO trucks; small hens and
Plymouth Rock broilers easier, balance
iteady; hens, over 5 pounds. 21; 5 pounds
and down. 22%: Leghorn hens, 20%;
broilers. 2% pounds and down, colored. 24:
Plymouth Rock. 25: White Rock. 25%:
springs, 4 pounds up. colored. 20; Ply
mouth Rock. 28%. White Rock 28%;
under 4 pounds, colored. 24%: Plymouth
Rock. 20%: White Rock. 26%: bareback
chickens. 20-22: roosters, 14%: Leghorn
roosters. 13%: ducks. 4% pounds up. col
ored. 10%; white. 16%: small, colored. 15:
white. 15. geese. 11: turkeys, tomi. old,
18; young. 21; hens. 21.
U. S. Treasury Notes
NEW YORK. May 8 —Prices quoted
in dollars and thirty-seconds:
Approx.
Rat*.—Maturity.
2s Sept.. 1942_
l%s Dee., 1942_
•%s Mch., 1943_
1%* June. 1943_
1* Sept., 1943
1%» Dee.,. 1943_
1* Mch.. 1944_
%s June, 1944_
it,. iSSt1:
%s Mch.. 1945_
•%s Dee., 1945_
•1* Mch.. 1940_
_ ‘Subject to Federal taxes, but not to
State income taxes.
Army Waives Haircut Rule
For House of David Pair
B» th* OUttM Pr*M.
PORT CUSTER. Mich.. May I -
Uncle Sam has decided to waive the
Army’* shave-and-a-haircut rule foi
two bushy-bearded rookies from the
House of David, in deference to their
religious beliefs.
The recruits are George Ander
son, 31, and Prancis Buck. 27,
•electees inducted for service as
non-combatants. Plrst of their cull
to be called, both had expressed con
cern over Army regulations which
threatened to deprive them of their
long hair and beards.
"If it were not a religious belief •
■aid Maj. Eldon M. Stenjem. In
charge of the reception center here,
we might order the men to shave.
But as far as I am concerned they
can continue to wear beards and
braids if they like.”
Anderson played third baae for
the widely known House of David
baseball team for 14 year*. Both he
and Buck are electricians.
Listed Bond Values
Lower During April
By the AjaeoisUd Press.
NEW YORK. May 8.—There were
1.163 bond Issues aggregating $60,
571,622,863 par value listed on the
New York Stock Exchange as of
April 30. with a total market value
of $57,923,553,616 and average price
of 95 63.
This compared with 1,166 bond
issues aggregating $60 578.981,933
listed March 31 with a total market
value of $58,140,382,211 and averaga
price of 95.97.
MORTGAGE
LOANS
Favorable Rata
FIRST DIED OF TRUST OMIT
GEORGE I.B0R8ER
MS Indiana Am. M.W.
Natl «SM
AMPLE
FUNDS
TO BUY, REMODEL
OR REFINANCE
It's eosy to be your own loud lord
with the assistance of our sound
mortgage plan ... A small down
payment, plus the money you now
spend for rent, brings you to free*
ond-clear ownership years earlier.
Come in for hefpful, friendly advice.
511 Seventh St. N.W.
KAtieaal Sill
din liNnWta V. >. Trniirr
Equitable
Co-operative Building
Association
915 F Street ,
1,00ns to purchose or refinance your home and
other property upon prevailing terms of interest
and monthly payments.
ThIS association can be
a great aid to you if you
plan to build or buy your
home either in the Dis
trict of Columbia or near
by Maryland.
Over sixty years
of service to
Home Owners.
Organized 1879
National Permanent
SAVINGS MEMBERS
Are Making A Wise Investment
OFFICERS
Rosert E. Buckley, Pret.
Harry M. Packard, V-Prei.
Millard T. Dixon, Treat
Rolans M. Brown. Secy.
DIRECTORS
Torn B. Geier
Joseph F. Zeoowits
Francis L Neubeck
Alphonse C. Hammer
James E. Colutlower
Chas. M. WallinosrosD
These far-sighted men and
women are securing their
future by saving ... regu
larly . . . through the
National Permanent.
Not only do they receive a
maximum dividend each
year, but they have the
added satisfaction of
knowing that their savings
are safely invested in im
proved property through
out the District of Colum
bia. We invite your con
sideration.
NATIONAL FE1HARENT
BUILDING ASSOCIATION
719 TENTH STREET, N. W. NATIONAL 0254

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