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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 14, 1942, Image 34

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Uncle Ray's Corner
By RAMON COFFMAN.
Yesterday we were speaking about
the com and wheat crops of the
United States and Canada. Added
together, they amounted last year to
about 3.950,000,000 bushels. This Is
almost enough to give two bushels of
grain to every man, woman and
child on earth.
Of that amount, more than two
thirds was made up of corn. The
com crop of the United States is
the largest grain crop raised by any
nation in the world.
Only about one-fifth of the corn
crop is used as food for human be
ings. The rest is fed to livestock.
The one-fifth used for human
food is extremely important. It goes
Into millions of cans of corn snd
millions of boxes of corn flakes, also
Into popcorn and corn meal. Com
starch and corn airup are other food
products.
Every part of the corn plant has
value of one kind or another. The
eobs can be turned into a pulp for
stuffing mattresses. Another use of
the cobs is for fuel. Three tons of
cobs produce about as much heat
as one ton of hard wood The
leaves and stalks supply fodder for
livestock.
A high-grade paper is obtained
from the pith of cornstalks. The
pith also plays a part in making
smokeless powder.
Com, or maize, is a product of the
New World, but it has been planted
glAsrw * rumtm wt A
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wunotw =£■■
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JO DULL. Mowing. euTTiND gWATHlt I
gDOOAj* srvtnAL YAnog wiot I
In every continent. Southern and
Central Europe grow a great deal
of it. and it is a common crop in
the rich valley of the Nile Rivcf.
Large corn crops are raised in the
eastern and western ends of Aus
tralia. and in valleys of Burma and
Northeastern India.
We do not know where American
Indians first raised corn, but most
likely it was in Mexico. At least
2,000 years ago the natives of Mex
ico had fields of corn. Wandering
tribesmen probably carried the seeds
northward into the United States.
Popcorn is a special'kind of In
dian corn. The kernels have a hard
coating which does not let out
moisture.
The leak-proof coating makes it
possible for the corn to be popped.
The small amount of water inside
each kernel Is heated until it turns
into steam. The steam at length
becomes so strong that the kernel
explodes. The explosion turns the
kernels inside out and may make
it from IS to 20 times as large.
•Dor central interest section of your '
•ertobook.)
If you wish a copy of the leaflet
“Flying Machine Pioneers,” just
send a self-addressed (3-cent),
stamped envelope to Uncle Ray,
in care of The Evening Star.
Read Uncle Ray in The Junior Star
Every Sunday.
Take My Word for It
By FRANK COLBY.
Signs of the Zodiac
Zodiac is from the Greek word
eodiakos, meaning “a circle of ani
mals.” The zodiac is symbolic of
an imaginary zone in the heavens
in which move the sun, moon and
planets. The signs of the zodiac are
named for these 12 major constella
tions:
Aries, the ram, pronounced AY- I
ri-eez.
Taurus, the bull, pronounced '
TAW-russ.
Gemini, the twins, pronounced I
JEM-i-ny, the third syllable rhymes
with by, my.
•Cancer, the crab, pronounced ;
KAN-ser.
Leo, the lion, pronounced LEE-oh.
Virgo, the virgin, pronounced
VER-goe.
Libra, the balance or scales, pro
nounced LY-bruh.
Scorpio, the scorpion, pronounced
6KAWR-pee-oh.
Sagittarius, the arches. The first
syllable rhymes with badge, thus: i
6ADGE-i-TAY’ree-uss.
Capricornus, the goat, pronounced
KAP-ree-KAWR'nuss.
Aquarius, the water carrier, pro
nounced uh-KWAIR-uss.
Pisces, the fishes, pronounced
PIS8-eez.
•The Latin word for crab is "can
cer.” A malignant tumor or swell
mg was cBiicu a uaiiuci uccau&c me
ancients imagined that the radial !
growth resembled a crab.
It's Hard to Believe
Memphis: Please give the origin of
the word stf ward. MRS. D.
Answer—Steward is the modem
form of the Anglo-Saxon word
stiweard, meaning (hold your
breath!) "warden of the sty!” Its
hard to believe that a steward lit
erally is “the keeper of the pigs,” j
but it’s true!
Send for my exciting and in
formative "Grammar Test.” Send
a stamped (3-cent), self-ad
addressed envelope to Frank
Colby, In care of The Evening
Star.'
(Releated by the Bell Syndicate, Ine.)
To keep our independence, in
stead of being kept in dependence,
start a regular bond-buying pro
gram right now.
Answer to Yesterday's Puzzle
i
I
UNTIED —By Gluyas Williams
mm*
HUN* ON. BUT FINOS Hf AFTSft SOMC STRUB
TlBD IT *0 TI6HT IT SUNS, PULLS SHOt
HURT* HIS FOOT.TmCS dPP SO HE CAN
TO LOOS4N IT, BUT WORK ST KNOT
KNOT HOLDS PA«T BRTTf R
. »«—« ».<». m n a in , >» i
CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
HORIZONTAL
1 Tibetan ox l 22 Submerged 36 Printer s 1 47 The sun
4 To misuse 24 A plodder measure gg oriental
9 Priorities 26 Aptitude 37 Commands guitar
metal 38 French: ! 39 Music: as
12 Guido's high | friend written so to repeat
note 29 Blood 1 40 Clamor j 54 To persist
13 To set relation j 42 To hasten 56 To fasten
bounds to 31 Maiden off 57 Suffix used
15 Prominent loved by : 48 Christmas to form
17 To renovate Zeus j carol names of
18 Hostelry 32 Delicate 44 The very enzymes
19 Plural 34 Member of a end 58 Small finch
ending Finnish . 46 Comparative 59 Cloth
21 Bird's beak , people ending i measure
VERTICAL
1 An affirms- ' 8 To be mis- l 24 To incircle ' 41 Saltpeter
tive taken | 25 Beseeches 43 Correlative
2 Wing 9 Ringworm 27 Pertaining of neither
. „ ... 10 To intoxicate to musical 45 Dance step
I 11 Novel pitch 47 observed
ritv l 14 Human 39 Slave 48 Resort
Russian city beings j 30 Common 49 Things, in
4 Arabian ig writing ! carrier law
seaport fluid I <abbr.l 51 Prefix: three
5 Man's nick- ' 20 Act of 33 To perform 52 Sesame
name j sewing ! 35 To separate 53 Elongated
6 Says 22 Satisfied j from others fish
7 Compass 23 Acts of ' 38 More 55 Brother of
point pleasantness j frightened Odin
1, ■ . 1 ill - »■— I II- | ■ IL "ll I ■ .1 ,1 11..
I + * ^ t V f / * 7 IV II
- - —— -
is it" m n
Ti k#feji9 ™
** |l3 ggggfaT u ySBBBMk 3T]
n 33 34 35
36 ^ 37 M ||||)9
40 41 HP **" ' 43
44 45 44 |p 47
« 49 JEZ 50“ 51 52 ' [53
-
—-Si-■ 55
—■*—i i -' " ~ -
_
LETTER-OUT_
1 CLAMOR j |'I,
2 ONEROUS • [ | 2
3_ l*ttor-Out for mu. _
LOOSEST 3
4 SIGNOR Lottor-Out for a oart of th« body. .
5L*Uor-Out and act laaily. m
WADDLES 5
Remove one letter from each word and rearrange to spell the word
called for In the last column. Print the letter In center column opposite
the word from which you have removed it. If you have "Lettered-Out”
correctly you speculate.
Answer to Yesterday’s LETTER-OUT.
Letter-Out
<B) BETRAY—TEARY (look sorrowful).
<0) INMOST—MINTS (he makes money).
(O) ESPARTO—PASTER (a sticker).
iS) LISPERS—PLIERS (a tool for bendinf).
(T) POSTURER—POURERS (find them at teas'.
NATURE'S CHILDREN
SHORT-TAILED SHREW
(Blarina braricauda.)
Here is our smallest mammal—
5 inches long, full of energy and
determination, and given to minding
its own business. Short-tailed
shrews have a range from the Atlan
tic States to Nebraska, south to
Ohio, Maryland and the mountains
of North Carolina. They are re
placed in the South by a slightly
different species, and in the North
we have another species somewhat
smaller even than Blarina and of a
different color.
The shrews resemble mice and
have often been mistaken for them,
especially in their northern range.
ttt
They are far from acting like mice,
for their manner of living End ob
taining their food is that of the
despised weasels.
Shrews have lithe, supple bodies,
very short legs and long pointed
snouts. Their flesh is dark, fibrous
and strong smelling. This may be
accounted for by their carnivorous
habits, but many of our meat ani
mals have light-colored, tender flesh
free from odor. It must be the
blood-thirsty disposition, for the
shrew is a fearful killer.
Because of his intense activity,
the shrew is always hungry. He
is ravenously fond of all kinds of
flesh, even insects.
None of the shrews appear to
hibernate. They evidently could
not endure a fast that would cover
months; indeed, a shrew must have
food every few hours. ’Sven in the
coldest weather, shrews have been
seen out on the snow. Many of
the small animals have found it
wise to take up quarters in old bams
—By Lillian Cox Athey
and buildings where mice are estab
lished.
The disagreeable odor which all
shrews emit when frightened or
angry serves to protect them from
many animals, but not from all their
foes. Owls appear to be very fond
of them. They are responsible for
keeping the shrews in check.
Weasels do their part and include
them as a regular part of their
diet. Cats dislike them very much,
though they will kill them and even
bring them home to their babies to
play with. Even a kitten, will not
take a nibble of a shrew. Birds
of prey, mistaking them for mice,
will, upon discovering their blunder,
drop them. It is said that foxes
also will bring the shrew home fdr
the cubs to play with, but thev are
too unsavory for them to sample.
Shrews lead a partially under
ground existence. .They serve the
farmer insofar as tney hunt for
insects of all kinds. Their shallow
burrows are often seen, but they do
not have any system to them like
those constructed by the moles.
The short-tailed shrew is a sooty
color, slightly paler below. It has
only a very short tall, about one
fourth the length of the head and
body. The front teeth are chest
nut brown at the tips. The sense
of smell is very keen—indeed, the
shrew is often able to obtain a meal
left by another neighbor because of
this ability to catch a scent that is
some distance away.
Bedtime Stories
By THORNTON W. BURGESS.
Never tay a thins it to
Until you really, truly know.
Sammy Jay awoke in a bad state
of mind. Yes, sir, he was in a bad
state of mind. He felt cheap, dread
fully cheap. He couldn’t remember
when he had felt so cheap. You see,
he had discovered that Old Man
Coyote had given up his home in
the far corner of the Oreen Mead
ows. Then he had looked for several
days in every place he could think
of. *but found no trace of Old Man
Coyote. At once he had made up
his mind that Old Man Coyote had
i
| RACE RILEY and Hit COMMANDOS
DINKY DINKERTON
before the barom LEFT to
BOARD THE TUG 'AJAX*, HE
“ LEFT THE BOVS INI THE BATH
OF CABIN! 705, SCALED W
MATH THE WATER TURNED OKIl
ri f _jk/ i? a rT\ I
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE
‘' .. **—— ■ I,
f WHAT KEPTV f GEE. ITS ( OH. ThttS IS ^
YUH, ANNIE? SURE NICE AN* SAFE ENOUGH- II
PEACEFUL-- I (T WAS DOWN
>-;-—‘^ IN TH COVE THAT(
CANT MAG1NE
ANYTHN DANGEROUS
HAPPENIN' ROUND
MOON MULLINS
*" -i ■■ ■ ■ ■' ■ —1 ■■■ ■ »i
/ UNCLE WILLIE ?-oh\ /tHE WHELPfN
/ \ «e ALWAYS \
( ca^l^co^suut 1 ™*EfNMK
-THEM TURKISH
AND WHAT "TO DO OKI / DANCERS WAS
His VACATION. y ^ MORE
^ *TTR*?„%,
THE SPIRIT
r YOU RAY THt* THAT* Rl*HT.'l ,■/ ANP TONM&HT Hi'S A CROOK
OR. FUTURE ^mAhOtht positive 1 J HE prom*** plf AN© A PAKERU
PROPW**l*S HCAMAEEtM I TO PORSTCU. HU r KNOW IT!. ‘
MORRltLE ACCMNTS > HAPP*N..0UT I 1 % SOMETHIN* ANO-.I.-EK.
AN© 7W*V ACTUALLY* CANT PROVE ITl \ /OHASTLY THAT* 1% THOUGHT YOU
V HAPPEN T? IT'S UNCANNY. L / BOIN* TO HAPPEN 7 MKSHT 4
But h**s always\ \ to me i hm.mjh: / stumble onto
I AUmf§.J INTEREST* fe"/^SOMC EVIDENCE!
FLYIN' JENNY
IF WE CAN STALL ANOTHER FEW MINUTES
THE SMOKE WILL PREVENT THOSE
GEE, I EVEN FORGOT
THEV HAD A PLANE
— BUT WHERE ?
MUTT AND JEFF
/VOU HEARD ME! I SAID,
CUT OUT THAT NOISE"! Lr\~"XSM
\ WAMNA !pA^THEj|^P
left the Green Meadows for good,
and promptly had flown all over the
Green Meadows, to the Smiling
Pool, and through the Green Forest,
telling every one he met that Old
Man Coyote had left. Then, just
before he fell asleep that night,
what should he hear but the voice
of Old Man Coyote himself. Do you
wonder that Sammy Jay felt cheap
as he sat in a hemlock tree and
thought it all over?
Now it is a funny thing how some
people feel when they have done
something foolish. They get angry,
not with themselves, but with some
one else who isn’t to blame at all.
Sammy Jay did. The more he
thought it over the angrier he grew.
And whom, do you thing he was
angry with? Why, Old Man Coyote!
Yes, sir, Sammy Jay was angry
i
with Old Man Coyote for not having
gone away when he, Sammy, had
said he had. Of course, that was
perfectly silly, but do you know
there are lots of people just as silly
as that? They do foolish things and
then try to put the blame on others.
Of course. Old Man Coyote didn't
know anything about this. All that
time when Sammy Jay had been
looking for him and couldn't find
him he had been very busy, very
busy, indeed. He had been making
a new home. You see, he had felt
that he could not live with any
peace of mind in his old home in
the far corner of the Green Mead
ows now that Farmer Brown’s Boy
knew where it was. He would never
feel safe there again. That meant
that either he must leave the Green
Meadows and the Green irest al
ii
(Tktrt't rtml WwiMr* to tki Smmdty temict.J
(Laugh at Man Mmllimt n Smmirny, tarn, m ika talar*4 comic tteHamJ
(Flyin' Jenny else fliet every Sunday in ike entered enmie teiHan.)
" 'V.WI r . . .1«
(Watch for Mutt aud Jag’s laughable escapades iu the talared comic section of The Sunday Star.)
together or else that he must find
a very secret place in which to make
a new house, a place where no one
would think to look tor him. It was
just this last that he decided to do,
tor he liked the Green Meadows
and the Green Forest too well to
leave them altogether.
Now, on the Green Meadows there
was no place so lonely and which
had so few visitors as the far corner
where he had had his home, so
right away he decided that as this
had been found he would have to
leave the Green Meadows and look
for a place close to them. He went
straight to the Green Forest and
all through it, looking for a place
to make a new home. But there he
could find no place to please him.
Besides, he didn’t care to live in
the Green Forest If he could help it.
*
ii > ■»« » r»—»» IH
(Don’t mist Dinktrton's hilarious od van torts hs tka tolortd aomie saction on Smmdsft.)
(More of Orphan Annie's thrilling adventures in tka entered semis section of The Sunday Star.)
(Kttp up with Tkt Spirit’t mar am trim* tm Tba Smmday Start taatia baah.)
a
—ly MHbum Rosstr.
■i
—By Art Huhto
IR WHEN DINKY'S FOOT WAS |
1 TICKLED ME STRAIGHTENED ■
I OUT WITH SUCH FORCE ■
| THAT PRESTO// 1
<£'*5* I
# Rw * vCSS .O 1
—By Harold Gray
YHAGrcTl [ AN*
A REAL AXIS SUB , ALL THOSE MAS G THOSE fl
BLEWUP ANSANK.' MEN ON. 1 SCOW FULL O' UJCKY I
nr killed! ) gasoline ak accidents I
SUPPLIES BLEW
I UP. TOO
—ly Frank Willard
6««: you shouloOn
WARNED ME ABOUT
VHER YEARS A60.ZAZ0.
I MARRIED THE H
1
—By Will Eisner
|_\ % ^ 1
—By Russell Keaton and Glenn Chaffin
I LL GET THE SHIP TAW IT BUT AS JlP ATTEMPTS TD REACH
OUT HERE-*XJ TAKECARE. THE Hi DOE M PLANE
OF THEM DAMES—AND bmr
MAKE IT final/getME? vtTf too lATE-ANOjust because
I l THAT CLUCK REM0ABERS HE
* \USED T> HAVE A SISTER/
stD-J (_j
■ II I I I I I !■_I
—By Bud Fisher
/how (SET OUT AND
STAV OUT/ I'LL SAOWyi
^Vou Wrtcfe BOSS
He wanted a more open place, a
place that was more like the open
country of the great wide west,
where he had been born. So he left
the Green Forest and went over to
the Old Pasture. This was better.
To be sure, it was much overgrown
with bushes and tangles of vines,
but there were open places, and it
was not at all like the dark depths
of the Green Forest, where the
trees were so tall and shut out the
sunlight. Then, too, those tangled
vines and briers made splendid hid
ing places.
So Old Man Coyote made up his
mind that if he could find just the
right spot in the Old Pasture that
was the place for a new home. Very
carefully he went all over it, and at
last he found Just what he was look
ing for. In the middle of a great
tangle of bushes and vines were
some great rocks which formed a
very tiny cave. In this Old Man
Coyote began to dig, and to his
great delight he found that he could
dig down and under the rocks. It
wasn’t easy digging, but it could be
done. So he went to work with
might and main, and that is where
he was and what he was doing all
the time Sammy Jay had been look
ing for him. He had finished his
new house the very afternoon that
Sammy spread the news that he had
gone away.
Stamp, stamp, stamp the beys are
marching—and so are the girb—te
the War savings stamp windews
ef peet nffices everywhere. Are reu
in the parade?

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