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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 24, 1943, Image 9

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Extra Pay Big Lure for Submarine Crews,
But Excitement Is Chief Attraction
By CHARLES McMURTRY,
Associated Press War CorresDondent.
ABOARD UNITED STATES SUB
MARINE IN THE PACIFIC—Why
Is a submariner?
They’re all volunteers in jobs gen
erally considered the most danger
ous in the Navy. Yet most of them
wouldn’t trade for the peace and
contentment of a farm in Iowa.
Lt. Comdr. Philip H. Ross, skipper
of this submarine, suggests three
reasons:
"Fifty per cent extra pay is a big
Inducement. (All submariners get j
it.) •
"Promotion usually is faster.”
"There aren't so many restric
tions.”
He omits probably one of the most
important—excitement of the chase
and the thrill of hearing your tor- !
pedoes explode against the hull of!
enemy ships. Only the skipper. J
looking through his periscope, sees :
most torpedo hits, but every one
hears the explosions and feels the
concussion rock the submarine a
little.
Ensign E. W. (Si) Lake of New
Britain, Conn., has been in sub
marines 15 of his 22 years in the
Navy.
"It just happened (that he got
into submersibles) but I wouldn’t
frade with any one,” he said.1
"There’s nothing like ’em."
He said that after six war pa
trols—the first begun at 6 p.m. De
cember 8, 1941, from Manila Bay—
he was offered a Shore job. He re
fused, with thanks but speed.
A shore job might have meant re
union with his wife and daughter
Jeannette, but even that was not
enough to induce him up from the
depths.
Left Airplane Job.
Ensign H. A. Montgomery, 24, of
Newark, Ohio, came to submersibles
from—of all places—airplanes. Un
til a year ago he was civilian chief
of a B-24 bomber ground crew at
Chanute Field in Illinois. Then he
decided to go undersea.
Ensign Ray E. Stewart, 24, of St.
Petersburg, Fla., was graduated from
the University of Florida, then man
aged a dairy at Norwich. N. Y„ be
fore coming into submarines seven
months ago.
Other officers on the ship in
clude Lt. Henry C. Lauerman, 26.
of Chicago, gunnery and torpedo
officer; his assistant, Lt. (j. g.) John
M. Barrett, 23, of Lcs Angeles and
formerly of Oak Park, 111., and Lt.
(j. g.) Jack J. Hinchey, 24, Omaha,
engineer and diving officer.
All came into submarines because
they thought they'd like the life and
excitement. No one mentioned the
60 per cent extra pay their skipper
gave as a probable lure.
Of all the ship's personnel. Lt.
Comdr. Ovid McMaster <Mack> But
ler, 29. of Washington, D. C., the
executive officer and navigator, said
he didn't exactly volunteer.
“I was on a destroyer one day and'
my orders came through to go to a
submarine school, so I went and
here I am. They had said they
needed submarine men and I said I
was walling, so they picked me.-’
Glad He Made Change.
But he's glad he made the change
and so is Comdr. Ross, who has rec
ommended him for a medal and ex
pects him to be commanding a sub
marine of his own one of these days.
Comdr. Butler, who has a wife and
daughter. Mary Elizabeth, 8 months
old, in San Diego, found the Aleu
tians “a pretty nasty place to operate
but not too bad. We didn't run into
much except a lot of whales. They
scare you to death—they look like a
periscope at night.”
Crew member Albert Smallcomb.
19. of Buffalo. N. Y„ came into the
service two years ago by accident. "I
wanted diesel motors and had to
come to submarines to get them.
But I wouldn't trade with nobody,"
he said.
Torpedoman First Class Andrew
Dawson, 23, of Norwich, N. Y.. gets
his biggest thrills from hearing his
“Tin Fish” explode against Jap
anese ships. That’s one reason he
wouldn’t go onto surface ships.
There are 23 Japanese rising suns
painted on the torpedo tubes—each
representing a hit on a Japanese
ship. This sub has an exceptionally
good marksmanship record. The 23
torpedoes accounted for 10 ships
sunk or damaged.
N. O. Thomas "From a little town
up in Washington,” came to the ship
from an old S-type submarine.
'Boy, she looked like a hotel be
side that old S-boat,” he said. “I
had a chance to go back to her.
That meant six weeks leave in the
States, but no thanks, I like it here
too well.”
The sub was clean and bright,
the air fresh, the bunks looked com
fortable and the food w;as delicious.
"We’ve had steaks for breakfast.,’
Lake volunteered. “We could have
three times a day if we wouldn’t get
tired of them.”
There's an easy camaradery among
submariners.
Lnjoy Listening to Kadio.
There is discipline, have no de
lusions as to that, but men don't
live so closely so long without get
ting well acquainted.
And there's a radio, on which they
listen to Tokio Rose and Moscow
Mary and Japanese propaganda
broadcasts when they're in Nip
ponese waters.
"There's seme guy, I forget his ]
name, who always opens his pro
grams Hello. America, you build ’em.
we sink 'em,” the captain said. “We
get a big kick out of that—then go
sink another Jap.
“One night we heard United States I
prisoners singing a South American
song."
Skipper Ross was born in Alaska j
and went to Kemper Miitary Acad
emy at Goonville, Mo., before he de
eided on Annapolis and a navy life.
Comdr. Ross had a year on the
battleship Wyoming before he turn
ed to submarines.
He has a wife and a son, Philip
H . jr., in Annapolis. He said his
wife—none of the inducements he
lists as luring others into subma
rines—sent him into submersibles.
“She wouldn't let me go into avia
tion.”
Comdr. Butler Graduate
Of Western High School
Lt. Comdr. Butler lived at 3312
Rowland place N.W. on his last tour
o! duty in Washington and his
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Ovid McOut
Butler, live at 4713 Harrison street,
LAST WEEK
U Enroll for
"Berlitz Summer Courses**
In French. Spanish. German . . . and
Save. POSITIVELY no enrollment lor
these Special Courses shall be ac
cepted after June #8. Classes 9 to 9.
The Berliti School of Lanrnavet
839 17th St. N.W. (cl Eve) NA. 9270
• • AIR-CONDITIONED • •
4
Chevy Chase, Md. His father Is
secretary of the American Forestry
Association and editor or its maga
zine, the American Forester.
The elder Butler described his son
as "quiet and with a fine disposition
for a boy.” He told how Comdr.
Butler, a graduate of Western High
School, was trying to decide on a
college to attend when he came
downstars to breakfast one’morn
ing and exclaimed, "Well, I've made
up my mind. I’m going to the Naval
Academy."
He took the competitive exam
ination for an appointment, but won
only a fourth alternative. Happily
for the boy and luckily for the
Navy, the three men a’.iead failed
to pass their physcial examinations
and Butler was appointed.
The officer was born in Ogden,
Utah, but was brought to Washing
LAST WEEK
to Enroll for
“Berlit* Summer Courset*
In French. Spanish, German . . . and
Save. POSITIVELY no enrollment for
these Special Courses shall be ac
cepted after June *J8. Classes V to 9.
The Berlitz School a* Language*
*30 17th St. N.W. (at Eye) NA. 0370
• • AIR-CONDITIONED • •
ton by his parents at the age of 11.
A younger brother, 20-year-old Scot
Butler, volunteered for the Army
and is a corporal stationed at Fort
Sheridan. He also has a married
sister, the former Elizabeth Anne
Butler.
The commander's parents have
not heard directly from him for
about a month. His father said
that although his son liked serving
on surface craft when he was aboard
the ill-fated Lexingtton and other
ships, he was “completely sold” on
submarines since his transfer to un
dersea duty.
More Ships Reported
Leaving Gibraltar
By the Associated Press.
MADRID, June 24.—Dispatches
from La Linea yesterday reported
the new Britaish battleship How
ard and four destroyers had left
Gibraltar for the Mediterranean.
(The dispatches used the name
of Howard, but it is possible the
Howe was meant, there being no
British battleship Howard.)
Peerless—Friday Only
CLEARANCE
#
FRIDAY . . . your lucky day! Furniture values you never thought possible
in these days of difficult replacement problems. Hundreds of fine furniture
items that for one reason or another must be closed out. Odd pieces! Floor
samples! Broken suites! Scan this list and then be on hand early Friday!
20% to 35% SAVINGS!
13— $55.00 Channel Back Fireside Chairs. Steel spring construction,
beautiful tapestry upholstery_ $39.98
2—$198.00 Solid Mahogany Victorian Sofas—custom made, spring
construction _$169.00
2—$298.50 Three-piece Mohair Living Room Suites, large, comfort
able _$245.00
10— $19.95 Tufted Seat and Back Lounge Chairs, wine or blue_$13.66
9— $17.95 Mahogany Eighteenth Century Occasional Chairs_$12.50
1— $18.95 Mahogany Drop Leaf Console Table with drawer_$13.95
15— $19.75 Layer Felt Mattresses with striped woven ticking_$13.95
5— $89.50 Twin Decorators Beds. Leatherette upholstered headboard,
steel coil box spring on legs with pre-built border mattresses, $67.75
1— $69.95 Six-piece Knotty Pine Dinette Suite, table, four chairs
and buffet. Floor sample_$38.85
2— $155.00 Modern Walnut Four-piece Bedroom Suites_$109.00
5— $69.50 Toasted Mahogany Modern Lowboys with oblong mirror $36.50
2— $74.50 Three-piece Modern Wralnut Bedroom Suites_ $57.75
1—$295.00 Five-piece Twin Riviera Pink Bedroom Suite, upholstered
headboards, Grand Rapids construction_$188.00
18— $10.95 Cotton Mattresses—all standard sizes_ $8.88
3— $109.95 Three-piece Solid Rock Maple Colonial Bedroom Suites.
Hand rubbed finish, dust-proof construction_$85.00
5— $21.95 Solid Maple Students’ Desks_$13.88
— $19.75 to $2450 Odd Twin and Double Panel Beds_$13.65
3— $27.95 Modern Walnut Vanities_$13.66
2— $94.50 Seven-piece Modern Champagne Oak Dinette Suites_$6450
2— $99.50 Seven-piece Modern Champagne Maple Dinette Suites_$75.00
3— $39.50 Modern Bleached Maple Dinette Buffets_$22.50
1—$119.00 Four-piece Mahogany 18th Century Bedroom Suite_$88.00
14— $15.50 Six-Drawer Walnut or Maple Chest of Drawers_$12.75
1—$159.00 Six-piece Modern Limed Oak Dining Room Suite—oval
extension table and credenza buffet. Floor sample_$9950
1—$550.00 Bleached Modern Dining Room Suite from Grand Rapids
Furniture Exhibition Display_$398.00
1— $4950 Mahogany Duncan Phyfe Extension Dining Room Table—
floor sample-$29.95
15— $4.95 to $5.95 Odd Dinette and Desk Chairs. One of a kind_ $2.88
16— $14.75 Walnut Modern Occasional Chairs. Choice of rose or
turquoise - $9.95
4— $33.00 Modern Toasted Mahogany Bookcases_$2250
37— $2.50 to $3.95 Fibre and Sisal Rugs, 27”x54"_ $1.49
43—$3.95 to $4.75 Fibre Rugs, 36"x72"_ $2.49
17— $7.50 to $850 Fibre Rugs, 4'/2'x7'_ $4.95
6— $9.95 to $11.50 Fibre Rugs, 6'x9'_ $650
38— $14.95 to $17.95 Reversible Fibre Rugs, 9'xl2’_$12.95
7— $21.95 to $24.95 Reversible Fibre Rugs, 9'xl5'_$16.95
USE THE
PEERLESS
BUDGET
PLAN
Free Parking
In Rear
^ Of Store
Open Thursday Wight Till 9
DON9T MESS THIS HITl
The Washington Workshop's Production of
"IT'S UP TO YOU"'
A timely breezy play with music, sponsored by the D. C. Food Industry
Committee in co-operation with the U. S. Deportment of Agriculture. •
NOW BEING PRESENTED EVERY EVENING
Through THURSDAY, JULY 1st
CUBTA1N at 8:30 P.M. (Na Performance Bandar Ereninr)
DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE AUDITORIUM
Mth fir Independence Are. N.W. (South Bldg.)
TICKET8 MAY BE OBTAINED AT HECHT COMPANY AND WOOD
WARD & LOTHROP WAR BOND BOOtfHS BY PURCHASING A 25c i
WAR SAVINGS STAMP. (AUDITORIUM IS AIR-CONDITIONED.)
.
I (4 POINTS)
I Donald Duck
I SWEETENED OR
I UNSWEETENED
I Grapefruit
I JUICE
I *T. ^ Ac
I can
I
I (10 Points Per Can)
I Stokefy's Finest
I SLICED
I BEETS
J 2 - 21*
(16 POINTS)
Stokelv’s f inest
y
YELLOW CLING
SLICED
Peaches
19c
KELLOGG'S
CORN
FLAKES
(4 Points Per Can)
Crosse Lr Blackwell
CONDENSED
SOUPS
Your choice of Noodle, Veg
etable Beef or Chicken Broth
37c
HOME- i
GROWN, j
ROUND, j
FRESH
GREEN
i BEANS
i 10‘
;I Home-Grown Yellow ^ lh *| ^ -
SUMMER SQUASH... Z ij
!| RED RADISHES_2 9C
;! Sweet and Juicy . ^ P" _
:! California ORANGES._ 1.
California LEMONS_ jj1
CAROLINA
New Potatoes
5,i- 21e
Preferred by Thousands
of Washington Housewives
VITAMIN
:« ENRICHED
FOR
BETTER
HEALTH
W»WWWW»WWVVWmWUMWtWWV»WM
Pure Vegetable (S Red Points) ». Air
i| SHURFINE SHORTENING_pks *■
Sunshine Wheat Toast Wafers.. >» 19c
Nabisco Arrowroot Biscuit_*;**?■ 11c
t Nabisco Lorna Doones_14c
KIBBLETS DOG FOOD_10c
CLAPP'S
STRAINED
BABY
FOODS
<► Your choice of Vegetable
<► Soup with Bacon, Beef Soup
** with Vegetables. Vegetable
<: Soup with Lamb. Mixed
Vegetable Soup or Un
]► atrained Vegetable Soup.
3.20c
SPRY
l SHORTENING
* 26c
5 Red Points
per lb.
i: FRENCH’S BIRD SEED_2 ^ 25c
<; FRENCH’S BIRD GRAVEL_2 -19c
i: BORAXO (FOR DIRTY HANDS)_* OZ. pkg. 15c
:: White Rock Mineral Water_3 >&£■ 47c
i: White Rock Mineral Water_2 \v.r 43c
l ASK FOR SPARKLING PEPSI-COLA
:-74 POINTS) I
Campbell's I
PURE I
i Tomato I
; juice I
large C 1
47 oz. M m I
can mi . I
(14 POINTS) I
1 Stokely's Finest I
! Golden, Whole 1
I WAX
I BEANS
n» 72.c I
con |
>
fc
[ The Real 1
j McCORMICK I
Prepared j
MUSTARD I
\ English Style 1
I or Horseradish 1
» - Tc 1
I i°r m I
Van Camp's I
': TREAT FOR LOVERS OF I
: AVRCARONI or SPAGHETTI 1
1 TEHDER0H11
12 17c I
\ vv^vvv^v^v^v^vv%M I
! (5 Red Points) j
\ BROADCAST I
redimeat 1
L Luncheon Meat I
12 ounces of meat, ready- I
j to-eat. No waste, bone I
or fat-all solid meat. I
,>.r.9Cc I
- _|
LIFEBUOY
HEALTH SOAP
cake ^ Q
It Floats
SWAN SOAP
Xf. 10c
For Fine Laundering
LUX FLAKES
S. 10c
WWWWWWMWWWW
For Washing Clothes
PARSONS'
HOUSEHOLD «. ia
CLEANSER_bot* l>c
WW»W»»VW»»VWWWW»WVM
ZERO
BLEACH AND
DISINFECTANT
A 17c
r— ■ ■ — —
Guest Size
IVORY SOAP
rake <JC
mwmuwwwHvtwM
The Soap of Beautiful Women
CAMAY
'»* 7c
HUDSON
'Ultra-Soft' Tissue
4ro,u 22c
HUDSON
PAPER TOWELS
3ro,u 25c
HUDSON
WHITE 3 Dk„ 73.
I NAPKINS 3 Z3C
mWtWWHWHHWWHHH
Prices effective Friday. Jane IS. till
dose at businesa Saturday. Jans 16.
MM3. We reserve the rtaht te limit
•uantltles. NO SALES TO DEALERS.

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