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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 04, 1943, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1943-11-04/ed-1/seq-6/

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Purity of Womanhood
Becomes Involved in
Esquire Hearings
The purity of American woman
hood. cerca 1900. .somehow got mixed
up with the Esquire hearing at the
Post Office today. In the ensuing
discussion, t lie woman of today
didn't come out so well.
Just how the women of 43 rears
ago became involved with the mod
ern Varga girls, who with some
other features in the magazine
brought the law down on the pub
lishers. was confusing to tlie witness.
Dr. Petei Marshall, pastor of the
New York Avenue Presbyterian
Church here.
Dr. Marshall, under cross-examina
tion by Esquire Counsel Bruce
Bromley, had just finished telling
the Post Office tribunal he thought
the general moral tone of the day
was not all it should be.
Deplores Modern Trend.
^ ou deplore the trend of modern
times as detrimental to our morals,
don't you?" Mr. Bromley asked.
Yes. Dr. Marshall replied.
You have advocated that women
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22nd Year NAtional 1333. 1323 G .Street N.W.
Sprerh. rer*nnal Development Fuhlic Speaking. Conversation.
.return to the standards of purity
[of 1900. have you not?"
"Did I specify a year?" the pastor
inquired. “I don't remember speci
fying a year. I don't know what
standards prevailed in 1900. I
wasn't even born then.”
Mr. Bromley asked the witness to
answer the question. Dr. Marshall
said he couldn't see what the ques
tion had to do with the matter at
hand. Mr Bromley persisted.
"Well.” the minister said, "I be
lieve that womanhood has been
definitely lowered by equality with
man. For 19 centuries woman was
revered and respected and on a
higher plane than man. To achieve
equality, she had to step down from
that high plane.
“The only thing man had which
she had not were vices. When she
achieved equality, she took over
these vices.”
Queried About Writers.
Mr. Bromley listed some regular
contributors of Esquire, including i
Father Flanagan of Boys' Town,
George Jean Nathan, drama critic,
and the late William Lyon Phelps,
educator and literary critic. He
asked Dr. Marshall whether these
men would have been associated
with the magazine if Esquire car
ried "obscene” matter, as the Post
Office charges.
"The fact these men were con
tributors.” Dr. Marshall replied,
"may have been an error in judg
ment on their part.”
Dr Marshall admitted he had
spent only "an hour or an hour and
10 minutes” on 11 specimen issues of
Esquire which had been given him
for study. He saio he could not be
sure that he had read all or part of
any specific article in the 11 copies.
Esquire must show' cause why its
second-class mailing privilege should
not be revoked because of its con
tents.
Oakes
fContinued From First Paget
son-in-law said. ' He was very rude
to me."
He added that lie was puzzled by
the ill feeling.
De Marignv's account of his court
ship was brief.
They had known each other for
months, he related, when he went
to New York in March, 1942. for
medical treatment. He saw Nancy
often while there, he said, and
made a trip to California with her
in the company of Mr. and Mrs.
George de Rapp
When they returned he under
went an operation
Guard Beside Witness Stand.
"I told Nancy that if it turned
out all right, we could get married,"
he said. *
"On May 19. 1942, we were married
at New York."
A helmeted guard stood beside the
witness stand while De Marigny
talked.
Apparently eager to get on with
ms story, the husband of Sir Harry's
"Idest daughter .strode confidently
mo the courtroom for the opening
if the session.
He hesitated at the door, and a
Utard motioned for him to enter
he cage.
"Is the accused ready to take the
witness stand?" Sir Oscar inquired.
"Yes, your honor." Mr. Higgs re
plied.
Lady Oakes Attended Parties.
A hush settled over the jammed
courtroom, and De Marigny went to
the stand.
"I first met Lady Oakes sometime
in 1938." the witness related, refer- j
ring to the widow of the aged baro-i
net who was beaten and burned to.
death the night of July 7-8 in a 1
bedroom on his rambling estate.
Westboume.
Asked whether he often was in
vited to social affairs at the Oakes'
home. De Marigny replied:
"She usually invited me to her
parties, and came to mine "
r'rhe only sounds in the room, other
:han De Marigny s voice, were the
scratching of the chief justice's pen
and an occasional cough
De Marigny told Mr. Higgs that he
tad more than £7.000 'about $30,000'
at the time of the marriage, includ
ng £1.000 owed to him by John H.
Anderson.
His story moved swiftly to the time
ast fall when Nancy became gravely
11 in Mexico City of typhoid fever,
ind Sir Harry and Lady Oakes hur
led to the scene.
The witness leaned his elbows on
he rail and looked squarely into Mr.
Higgs' eyes while the latter ques
loned him.
"Sir Harry seemed very friendly
when he arrived at Mexico City,"
De Marigny related
Lady Oakes paid the expenses
caused by Nancy's illness, the wit
ness related, but he did not agree
for her to do so.
"I paid £4.000 to Lady Oakes."
he said. "She transferred this
ARMY NURSES ARE IN FRONT LINES, TOO—Coveralls rolled
above her knees, an American Army nurse wades ashore at
Naples from an LCI (landing craft, infantry) while her "ship
mates'’ land gear by means of a human chain. - Navy Photo.
amount back to our account and 1
transferred it back to hers.
"She transferred this amount U
our account and again I transferrer
it back.''
Pale as Result of Confinement.
Continuing De Marigny said:
"We left Mexico City the firs
week of January, 1943, and went u
Palm Beach."
The accused man was pale, as f
result of his confinement of nearly
four months, and lias lost weigh:
since his arrest July 9.
De M.M'igny sometimes gestured
with his hands as he continued
telling of taking a room of Nancy's
hospital suite at West Palm Beach
In order that he might have hi.<
tonsils out.
"I received a call from Sir Harry
telling me to get the hell out oi
that room or he'd come kick mf
out." he said.
' I told Nancy and siie was terribly
upset. Her fever went up
"The next day I told Dr. Sayac
i Dr. William Y. Sayadi that she wa?
:o see nobody, and she gave the same
orders to the nurses."
"Still I wanted that order con
firmed by the doctor." de Marigny
idded. "but he wouldn't agree.
Domes Doctors testimony.
“He said that if Sir Harry or Lady
Oakes came lie would let them m.
“I was very annoyed at Savad and
told him that if Sir Harry insisted
upon coming in and disturbing my
wife'I w'ould have to knock him out
of the room."
"Dr. Sayad quoted you as saying
you would crack Sir Harry's head."
Mr. Higgs pointed out. "Is that
right.?'’
"No,” said De Marigny.
Mr. Higgs brought out that Lady
Oakes frequently telephoned after
Nancy had recovered
"Our relations . with Lady Oakes
were strained.” De Marigny said,
but our relations with Sir Harry
seemed better. Sir Harry was im
pulsive and vet;y moody.”
On March 1 De Marigny said he
same to Nassau and Nancy followed
him a few days later.
He said lie decided to re-enter the
poultry business, but he refused to
use the property offered by Sir
Harry.
De Marigny smiled for the first
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r IT YOU DON'T GIVE ENOUGH 'l
The Community Wor Fund needs S4,800,000 this
year. That's TWENTY PERCENT MORE than last
year. There are many reasons why, but it can be
summed up by saying that wor is not kind to men
or to women or to children. Wor hurts everything it
touches, ond in wartime humon beings of every
station, every race and creed need help ... the kind
of help only YOU can give.
Suppose YOU don't give any more this yepr than
you gave last year or the year before. Then what
happens?
SOMEBODY ELSE HAS TO BEAR YOUR SHARE.
Somebody else has to do his own share by increasing
his gifts and then he has to make a contribution on
top of that, TO MAKE UP YOUR SHARE.
In plain words, YOU'RE NOT DOING YOUR FULL
PART UNLESS YOU GIVE MORE THIS YEAR
THAN EVER BEFORE. A few big gifts won't make
up the difference. New givers won't make up the
difference.
I ONLY YOU CAN MAKE UP THE DIFFERENCE
I (Are OJS (]K . . . for ALL These —
U. S. 0. and other War Hospitality.
United Nations War Relief.
Community Chests and Other Local Welfare.
I Community War Fund . . . 143 Appeal, in One Campaign
Federal Storage Company
1701 FLORIDA AVENUE ADAMS 5600
Officer*
E. K. MORRIS
President
HAROLD N. MARSH
Vice-Pres. and Counsel
JAMES M. JOHNSTON
Vice-Pres. end Treasurer
H. RANDOLPH BARBEE
R Secretary
B haul e. TOLSON
bn Asst. Vice-Pres.
Z *■ WEBSTER ADAMS
A.vst. Vice~Prrs
A. RUSSELL BARBEE
Asst. Secretory
Directort
BRICE BAIRD
H RANDOLPH BARBER
DANIEL L. BORDEN
HENRY P ERWIN
D. P. GAIL LARD
.FAMES M. JOHNSTON
HAROLD N MARSH
A. N. MILLER
CARROLL MORGAN
E. K. MORRIS
DONALD F. ROBERTS
FREDERIC N. TOWERS
GRIFFITH WARFIELD
time since he took the stand. It
flickered across his lace and he be
i came serious again.
"You and Harry were very
i Iriendly?" Sir Oscar asked.
"Oh yes. very iriendly," answered
De Marignv.
, "We did not spurn the Jones
property <a tract offered by Sir
Harry i but turned it down because
it was 15 miles away.
"We would never seen anybody if
we were there, and it would have
taken great capital to have made
the land useful."
"We made a trip to Governors
Harbor in March," De Marigny con
tinued.
“Upon our return Sir Harry told
us we were invited to a cocktail
party .it Government House by the
Duke for March 27."
He referred to the Duke of Wind
sor. Governor of the Bahamas
"I invited Sir Harrv to mv house
for dinner, but he was rude to every
body.
"When he left T walked In the
car with him. and he told me Nancy
and I were a couple of asses to have
a cocktail party.
"He said as far as he was con
cerned Nancy was going to have
nothing from him."
De Marigny testified that Sir
Harry threatened to have him < De
Marigny i and Mr. Higgs whipped
for writing a letter to Lady Oakes.
They wrote to ask her for a copy
of a letter addressed to her by Ruth
Fahnestock de Marigny. the defend
ant's divorced wife. Witnesses have
said the letter made various accu
sations against De Marigny.
De Marigny continued:
"He said 'as far as that girl in
your house is concerned.' referring
to Nancy, ‘she has caused trouble
for her mothpj- and me.' SJr HfU'ry
First Prince Georges
County School Joins
Paper Salvage Drive
The Columbia Park School yes
terday became the first Prince
Georges County school to join in I
The Evening Star-PTA salvage for
victory waste paner campaign.
Like the other nearby schools
which have enlisted in the drive to
gather in the waste paper which
is so badly needed in the present'
critical situation. Columbia Park
pupils will collect old newspapers,
magazines and cartons until ap
proximately 6,000 pounds have been
accumulated. Notification to ihe
salvage editor of The Evening Star
will then bring an order for the
dispatch of a truck to gather the
paper which before the following
morning will be on its way to a
mill.
Another recruit in Washington
enlisted when Bell School at Second
and D streets S.W. informed The
Star of its intention to begin col
lection. making the 97th school in
the campaign.
With partial reports for Tuesday's
collection tabulated, the second 100 -
000-pound mark had been passed
with the total figure recorded 219.
074 pounds. Tuesday's collection,
incidentally, was 36.198 pounds, the
said he didn't want anything to
do with her.
"Sir Harry was so mad I thought
he was going to hit me ’’
March 29 was his birthday. De
Marignv said, and the oldest Oakes
son. Sidney, was among the 20 guests
at De Marigny’s home for dinner.
"Nancy asked him to stay over
night," the witness said.
“About 4 o'clock in the morning
there was a terrible pounding on the
front door. Somebody shouted.
Open the door or 1 11 break it down.”
"I opened the door and Sir Harry
walked in.
"I took him into a guest room
"Sir Harry pulled Sidney by the
foot.
"He told him to get out of the
bed and put on his clothes and get
to hell out of this house.
Never Spoke to Sir Harrv Again.
"I never spoke to Sir Harry after
that morning.”
"You never spokes to him again?"
Mi'. Higgs asked.
De Mangny did not hesitate:
"No."
He said Nancy left for the United
States May 27 for medical treat
ment of her mouth.
Defense attorneys indicated the
tempo of the trial, which began its
16th session today, would be speeded
uip with the accused son-in-law of
I Sir Harry completing his testimony
l in two days.
Minor witnesses are expected to
follow until the week end recess, with
Marquis Georges de Visdelou. close
friend of De Marigny. taking the
stand Monday and Betty Roberts,
the marquis' friend, testifying next.
There were indications that the
trial, now in its third week, might
be concluded in another week and a
half. The defense has approximately
a score of witnesses awaiting call.
'Continued From First Paae.t
understood, it is sold as "half-and
i half,' but in the Washington
negotiations so far it has been
described as "enriched milk."
"The whole idea," one dairyman
said, "is to make the present sup
plier of rream go further by spread-j
Paper Collection
In Schools Tomorrow
The following is the schedule
for the collection of newspa
pers, magazines and cartons to
morrow in district 5 of The
Evening Star-PTA Salvage for
Victory program together with
the five leaders in the District
and their poundage to date.
Kingsman . _ _ 3.063 pounds
Logan -3,010 pounds
Taylor- 2.381 pounds
Pierce - — 1,154 pounds
Hayes .. _ 980 pounds
Brnning Taylor
Brown Junior Log an
Blow Blair
Webb Ludlow
Smothers Cardberry
Crum me) Haves
Kinssman Seaton
Pierre Gales
Madison
best day so far recorded in the
campaign.
Garrison turned in its first col
lection with a highly creditable
3,000 pounds. Other newcomers
were Eckington. with 1.150 pounds,
and Emery, with 1,080 pounds.
The Noyes School, which has only
about 350 pupils, collected 2.185
pounds for its best total to date,
which averaged a little better than
6 pounds per pupil. Noyes’ progress
has been steady, the first week to
taling 1.275 pounds and the second
falling just short of a ton with
1.923.
ing them out.” The 12 per cent
cream would give a greater distribu
tion for the present inadequate sup
plies of butterfai and relieve the
pressure for more cream from res
taurants and other large consumers.
Milk Producers Ask Boost
In Price, End of Subsidy
B> 'he Associated Pie 5
Major milk producer representa
tives laid belore Congress today a
legislative program calling for an
immediate increase of slightlv more
than 1 cent a quart in retail milk
prices and an end to Government
subsidies.
Directly counter to President
Roosevelts appeal this week for
continuance of the food subsidy
program. the proposed bill would
require the Office of Price Admin
istration to boost ceiling prices of
ail dairy products the equivalent of
of) tents a hundred pounds of whole
milk.
The National Co-operative Milk
Producers’ Association estimated the
t-meregney price increases would cost
consumers S149.000.000 for the initial
four-month period to which they
would apply. After 120 days, the OPA
and the War Food Administration
would be directed to adjust milk and
dairy product prices on a regional
or market basis to reflect increases
in production costs.
ADVERTISEMENT.
Kidneys Must
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Excess acidk. poisons and wastes In youi
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Getting up Night* ning Passage*, Bim
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Cjratec from row dbsgtfto today lor an ft iU
How about the roof? Make It
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stomach
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U frtrtra- £
Does your stomach go on (trilra
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Neither an antacid nor a laxative...
it doesn’t add to your trouble ... but
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Serve This Easy Way!
Place Vi package in dog'a dish. Soak wit!
boiling water! Let cool as directed. Lei
dog sniff—watch it disappear! Double
Your Money Back if it fai ls. Send cartoa
w ith unused portion to: The Quaker Oafli
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It won’t cost yon anything. Matter
of fact, it will save you money. But
it means a lot to him when he’s away
in camp. Here’s what he’s saying—
"Please give me a betterchance
to telephone home between 7 and
10 o’clock at night.
"That’s about the only time I’m off
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Remember, he may be calling
somebody right in your town or on
your street. Every time you stay off
the line you may help him get on.
. Ik Ckcapnk ft P»Immc Ufapka* U.
' r

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