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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 14, 1943, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1943-11-14/ed-1/seq-12/

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lastltatlenal treatment far an It
aral 4u> Is reeelred ta eliminate
the aravlnt and daaira and also ta
areata an a rentes ta Alaahel la aU
Ita forma. _ .
Writs or call for frss booklet
assff y&sssl
Greenhill Institute
3145 16th St. N.W.
Phone Doy or Night—CO. 4754
Civil Service to Fill
OPA Rationing Office
The post of rationing officer of
the District OPA will be filled by
a Civil Service examination, Robert
K. Thompson, District OPA director,
announced yesterday.
Mr. Thompson said he had re
ceived a number of applications for
the job which he announced some
time ago would go to a Washington
man with successful business ex
perience.
The vacancy was created through
the resignation of Heath C. Mor
man who is now assistant chief of
the scrap section of the steel di
vision cf the War Production Board.
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'Mystery' Armored Jeeps Play
Significant Role in Sicily
By THOMAS R. HENRY,
Star Staff Correspondent
WITH UNITED STATES »th
DIVISION IN SICILY (By Aerial
Courier).—A new kind of American
“battle wagon”—the Invention of a
Washington offi
cer—played a
significant role
during the Sicil
ian campaign.
From the dis
tance, a6 it came
bouncing over
the rocks of
Sicilian hillsides
it looked like a
tiny tank*. None
of the Nazi in
telligence re
ports, so far as
is known, ever
has mentioned
this strange new Thomas R Henry.
American vehicle. In fact few
American officers, except those in
the 60th Infantry and officials in
Washington who sanctioned its con
struction, knew what it was.
Actually, it waa an ordinary Amer
ican jeep equipped with armor plate.
The idea of the armored Jeeps oc
curred to the regimental commander
while on maneuvers in the United
States. He was with a reconnais
sance group which came linder sim
ulated rifle fire. They were, said the
umpire, “out of action.” That was
just what was likely to happen in
real combat, the colonel admitted.
After the maneuvers, he had a
cardboard model made and the
project was discussed with ordnance
experts. With orders from Wash
ington, a Pennsylvania foundry
forged the steel according to special
requirements.
She armor plate with driving slits
is in front of the driver and the
machine gunner, taking the place
of a windshield, and extends around
the sides, giving both frontal and
flank protection. It is made of steel a
quarter-inch thick and weighing 400
pounds. It gives the scouts protec
tion against .30 and .45 caliber pro
jectiles and from flying splinters of
shrapnel.
These armored jeeps have been
used in all engagements since the
North African landings but they
came into their own in the Sicilian
campaign. Men of the intelligence
and reconnaissance platoon who use
them were given the dual mission
of locating the enemies positions
and of finding a route which the
regiment’s heavier vehicles could
follow. The men had to operates
miles ahead of their foot troops in
hills where the best thoroughfare
was a mule trail down a rocky
stream bed.
“That little hunk of steel,” ex
plained Lt. Harold Willoughby,
Florence Junction, Ariz., leader of
the platoon, “is a wonderful com
fort when shrapnel and rifle bullets
are chasing you.”
In the platoon’s operations near
Floresta, three men in one of these
jeeps were wounded by shrapnel
after capturing a German patrol and
many more would have been in
jured had it not been for the armor
plate. Lt. Willoughby himself was
captured and rescued by his men
due to the ability of the jeeps to
travel through enemy-held terrain.
He had dismounted from his jeep
and was proceeding on foot ahead
of his platoon hunting for mines.
He was in a dried-up gully. Hound
ing a corner he glanced up and
found himself looking down the bar
rels of three German rifles.
“I knew I needed about 5 minutes
times,” he said. “If I was able to
stall long enough the men would
realize that something had hap
pened. But if they missed seeing
me they’d ride by and into the main
German position.”
Lt. Willoughby did some quick
thinking. He walked right up to
the patrol of three Nazis, head down,
poking the ground with a stick.
Then, lifting his head and pretend
ing to see them for the first time,
he vjflked ahead with a smile as If
ho *u meeting his boat friends,
■tuck out his hand and shook the
hand of each of the amazed Ger
mans.
"Say, I’d like that for a souve
nir,” he said and reached for the
German sergeant’s hat.
The Germans looked at each other
in bewilderment.
"You Francias,” Lt. Willoughby
continued. "Me Francals, too.”
"Sie sind Americaniche,” said the
German sergeant.
"Oh, no,” insisted Lt. Willoughby,
playing his part. "Me nuts, me
crazy.”
To prove his point he broke into
an exhibition of the latest G. I. jit
terbug steps. The Germans glanced
at each other, uneasily.
“I want a drink of water,” Lt.
Willoughby said, pointing to a pool
of very dirty water at his feet and
fumbling for his canteen. Precious
minutes were passing while he
stalled in this way. The Germans
grew impatient and told him there
was good water back a hundred
yards in the gully. But this was
the water he wanted, the lieuten
ant said, continuing to fumble with
his canteen.
Finally, growing impatient, the
German sergeant grabbed his arm
and started back with him. But the
ruse had worked. Before they had
taken a dozen steps they heard a
noise behind them, and there on top
of the gully were three of Lt. Wil
loughby’s jeep6 and his platoon ser
geant, Norman L. Martin, Belle
ville, 111. The Nazi patrol hardly had
realized what had happened before
it was riding back to the Ameri
can lines in one of the strange new
“tanks.”
Add part of your bloodstream to
the swelling tide of victory. Call
Blood Donors, District 3300, for an
appointment.
Richard W. Woolworth
Is Sued for Divorce
By the Associated Press.
TAMPA, Pl»., Nov. 13.—Richard
W. Woolworth, son of the founder of
the vast Woolworth dime store for
tune, was named defendant in a
divorce suit filed by his wife here,
attorneys said today.
Mrs. Woolworth, the former Mar
garet Brady of Scranton, Pa.,
charged desertion, and asked perma
nent custody of the Woolworth’a
three children, Charles Sumner
Woolworth II, 17; Barbara, IS, and
Richard, 8. She also requested tem
porary and permanent alimony for
herself and the children.
Charles Sumner Woolworth, II,
LONG LIFE
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of stores.
Mrs. Woolworth gave her address
as Redington Beach, Fla., and that
of her husband as San Francisco,
Calif.
Decries Late Hours
British children are being ad
versely affected by late hours, too
much noise, too much radio at home,
too much time at the movies, de
clared Miss G. Kerr, Educational
Psychologist of the Medical De
partment of Surrey, in a speech at
Addlestone, England.
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WHIPPET CLOTH OF SPUN RAYON that is ideal for casuals.
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STARLAND RAYON CREPE—A plain weave with a supple
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Children will love our bright story book print hankies . . .
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Colorful hand-block
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