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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 29, 1943, Image 9

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Russian People Plod
Back to Freed Towns
I
To Rebuild Homes
(Constantine Fedin, who was a
close friend of Maxim Gorky,
has become one of Russia's out
standing authors and journalists.
His novel, "Cities and Years."
which appeared in 1924 and dealt
with Germany and Russia dur
ing the World War and the rev
olution which followed, was
translated into many languages
and gained wide circulation.
Later novels include "Brothers.”
"Abduction of Europe” and
"Gorky.”)
By CONSTANTINE FEDIN.
MOSCOW, Dec. 29 (By Wireless
to N.A.N.A.i.—Near a pontoon bridge
across the Oka River in the Orel
region, across which loaded lorries
with guns of various caliber and
carts rattled by, stood an old fish
erman. Behind his back lay the
ruins of a town: sappers were busy
with their axes repairing the bridge
across the river, but he was heedless
to the noise and bustle and was en
grossed in his fishing.
The thunder of war stuns some;
in others it evokes self-sacrifice, de
termination and heroism. But even
in the flames of war man's struggle
for existence isn't destroyed.
On the edge of a road a woman
dragged a makeshift wheelbarrow.
Her face betrayed the violent ef
fort she had to make. The sacks
and bundles of her meager posses
sions were heavy, and the crooked
wheel of the wheelbarrow dragged
her from side to side, but she
pulled away for all she was worth
ever foiward and forward. Behind, a
slip of a girl hela onto a sack with
her left hand while with her right
she whipped along a goat harnessed
to the barrow. The goat appeared
to be giving more trouble than as
sistance.
People Return to Homes.
This is a common sight on the
roads and highways. People are re
turning to their homes from the rear
forests whither they had fled to es
cape persecution by the retreating
Germans or from concentration
camps to which they had been
driven.
Oiw man w;ho had seen a good
bit of the fighting said to me, "The
longing to be back home is so great
that nothing on earth can still it.”
These people sutler terrible hard
ships; their weary legs refuse to
carry their bodies, yet they plod on,
begrudging an extra minute's sleep
because it will delay their return.
Then they come and find their
home* In ashes. They weep and be
gin building life anew. “After all,
we're better off at home.” they say
The most horrible hardship which
fell to the lot of the people who
found themselves under enmy rule
was Imprisonment or deportation.
The retreating Germans drive every
single being, including children and
the aged, along with them. There is
no necessity for this measure, and it
isn't something that springs into
being on the spur of the moment.
It is a carefully planned system en
forced frbm above by the barbarians
in Berlin.
Propaganda Minister Joseph Goeb
bels, in numerous writings, has de
clared that he considered the “main
principle of German strategy is to
seize from the enemy as much living
space and as many people as pos
sible This is not only to deprive
the enemy the benefit of their labor
but to put them at our own service.”
The day after the Germans were
driven out of Ludinovo I happened
to come across a 17-year-old girl by
the name of Rima who escaped de
portation by hiding in the forest and
was among the first to return to
town when it was liberated. We
piled many questions on her and
first of all how the Russian youth
lived under the Germans.
“We, young and old alike, were
forced to dig trenches,” she said.
"The whole population?”
1 “Every human being," she re
piled. "We were taught In parties
to dig them a meter and one-half
long and a meter and one-half deep.
When we had done that another
half meter or so would be added.”
I recalled the German fortress
near Ostrovsky, with Its upright
walls and flooring so smooth and its
covering overhead, and I wondered
how much blood and how many
tears had been shed by the Soviet
women and girls under the whips
of German soldiers before these
grand German fortifications were
built.
Brutality Increases.
Retreating and driving the en
slaved people before them, the Ger
mans become even more brutal than
in the days of the occupation,
making their victims a usable part
of their war machine. They not
only force them to dig trenches
but make them put up stakes for
wire obstructions, clear paths in the
woods and also employ them as
living shields to clear mine fields.
They wear them out and leave them
to die or drive them further into
captivity.
Every one knows how cheap life
is once it is in the hands of the
Germans. We were, therefore, not
surprised to hear Rima exclaim
when she had finished talking, “It's
true the Red Army won't leave us
again, isn't it?” And then she add
$d seriously, "I shan't stay anyway.
It they won’t accept me In the army
111 flee to the woods.”
In each there Is but one wish,
one desire—to get away from the
Germans at all co6t.
(Released by the North American
Newspaper Alliance. Inc.)
British Provide Extra Miners
Wa» reserve police and paid “spe
cials” in London are to be released
for the coal mines if they wish to
help in the campaign to avert a coal
shortage.
Full Night's Sleep
On New Year Eve
Urged as War Aid
War Manpower Chairman McNutt
is asking the workers of America to
"get a full night's sleep on New
Year eve."
The WMC chief issued a statement!
yesterday calling on workers not only
to stay on the job New Year Day but
to postpone their New Year eve
celebrations.
"Workers not on the job, or work
ers who are not at their best on New;
Year Day,” he said,“'mean a loss of
planes, ships, guns arid other ma
terials of war." I
6 New Radio Stations
Aid in Ferrying of
Planes to Europe
Operation or a. network of six
long-wave radio communications j
stations is now greatly helping in:
the ferrying of aircraft across the1
Arctic and North Atlantic, the War
Department announced today.
Built by the Signal Corps under
hazardous conditions and function
ing under the Army Airways Com
munications System, the six stations
link the United States with New
foundland, Labrador. Greenland,
Iceland and Great Britain.
Officials said the network assures
24-hour radiotelegraph and radio
teletype confmunications uninter
rupted by atmospheric disturbances
and magnetic storms capable of in
terfering with and “blacking out"
short-wave communications. These
disturbances do not similarly affect
the long-wave system, so constant
radio communications Is assured.
To complete the network for the
Army Air Forces before winter, the
Signal Corps was required to ac
complish an unusually difficult con
struction job with emergency speed.
That it was done in time is largely
due to the efforts of Brig. Gen.
Frank E. Stoner, chief of the com
munications service of the Signal
Corps, and Brig. Gen. H. M. McClel
land, communications officer of the
AAF, who directed the task.
Radio technicians were drawn
from all parts of the compass to
complete the job. Civilian as well
as Army technicians were flown to
northern points from South Amer
ica, North Africa and Alaska, as
well as from both coasts of this
country. The Royal Air Force co
operated in the work.
Gas Coupon Thief Jailed
Russell Johnson. 20. colored, of
the 1300 block of Fifth street N.W..
was found guilty yesterday in Mu
nicipal Court of illegal possession
of gasoline ration coupons and
sentenced to 45 days in Jail. John
son, who was employed in a gaso
line station, stole coupons given to
him by customers, police said,
Polish Club to Hold
Social on Saturday
Polk dancing will feature the
Washington Polish Club social Sat
urday at Stansbury Hall, 5832
Georgia avenue N.W.
Mrs. Walter Lewicka will be
i hostess and Egno Leneski, social di
rector, will be in charge of enter
1 tainment and refreshments. Prank
Bukoski's orchestra will furnish the
music.
The party, which will begin at
8:30 pm., is open to the public.
RALEIGH IS OPEN
THURSDAY from
12:30 fo 9 P.M.
Only Because of the Small Groups and Broken Sizes, These
Unusual Savings in Raleigh's Washington-Famous Annual
Clothing Event! Choose From Men's Fine Suits, Topcoats
and Overcoats, Tailored to Our Quality Specifications!
Limited Quantities! No Returns, No Approvals. Mail. Phone, C. O. D Orders. All Sales Final. Items Subject to Prior Sale!
Raleigh Shoes
CALFSKIN AND SCOTCH GRAIN
Stroight-tips, wing-tips, moccasin styles!
Heavy-duty brogue type shoes, winter weight,
with hand-turned leather soles. Calfskin and
Scotch grains, made to Raleigh's standards of
good looks, long service. Not all sizes in
each style.
NOW AT REDUCTIONS FOR ANNUAL YEAR-END CLEARANCE
' ' * ■ f ' * *
<28> $35 ALL-WOOL COVERT AND TWEED SUITS m solid
colon ond herringbone. Sizes: Regulors—12) 36, (I) 38, • 2 »
39, (3) 40, (2) 42. Shorts I2.h 36,-ll). 37, 15) 38, (31
39, (2) 40. Long—(2) 38, (2) 44,'Tl)' 46.-$21.75
(37) $35 ALL-WOOL FLANNEL AND TWEED SUITS. Flon
nels in solid browns, blues, groys. Tweeds ond novelty weoves
in desirable colors. Sizes: Regulors— (21 36, (1) 37, (6l 38,
<4i 39, (51 40, (31 42, II) 44. Short—(I ) 36, (2) 37,
(2) 38, (3) 39, <4. 40. Long—(2) 40, (I) 46_$26.75
#
(751 $35 ALL-WOOL SUITS OF IMPORTED TWEEDS in her
ringbones, diagonols and solid colors. Sizes: Regulors— ( 3 ) 37,
(4) 38, (81 39, 18 > 40, (5) 42, (1) 44, ( f) 46. Short—
121 36, (81 37, (7) 38, (10( 39, (2» 40, (1) 44. Long—
(1) 42, (3) 44_$28.75
(1971 $39.50 and $45 ALL-WOOL WORSTED AND CHEVIOT
SUITS, renowned for wear ond good looks; in o splendid assort
ment of shades ond models. Sues: Regulors—(41 37, (6l 38,
(61 39, (71 40, (5) 42, (81 44, (6) 46, (5) 48, (3' 50.
Short—(ll 35, (41 36, 161 37, (71 38, (4i 39, (31 40,
181 42, (31 44, (21 46. Long—(7) 38, (8) 39, 17) 40,
(51 42, (81 44, 161 46, (3) 48. Stout—14) 39, (5) 40,
(41 42, 161 44, (51 46, (3) 48, (1) 50. Short-Stout—(31
39, < 61 40, (61 42, (61 44, (1) 46. Long-Stout—— (3) 42,
(4) 46, (3) 48. (3) 50_$36.75
(33) $45 ALL-WOOL SUITS OF IMPORTED SCOTCH TWEEDS
foilored by a fine maker in distinguished models. Sizes: Regu
. Jars—(1) 36, 41) 37, (2) 38, (3) 39 (!) 40 (3) 42,
'3) 44, ill 46. Short— (2' 36, (2) 37, (3) 38, \3» 39,
421 40, (3) 42. Long—(2) 38, (1) 40._ .. $38.75
(153) $50 ALL-WOOL SUITS OF FINE WORSTEDS, plus o
group of imported worsteds— every one tailored to Roleigh's
finest standards of workmanship. Sizes: Regulars—14' 37,
(5) 38, (3) 39, (61 40, i4) 42, «5) 44, < 6 > 46, (5) 48,
(3) 50. Short—(21 36, (3' 37, (4) 38, (5) 39,’ (4 • 40'
(5' 42, (11 44, (li 46. Long—(2) 37, (7) 38, )4' 39
(5' 40, (41 42, (6) 44, (51 46, (2) 48. Stout—(3) 39,
(41 40, 15' 42, (3) 44, (4' 46, (3) 48, (2) 50. Short
Stout— 141 39, ' 4 ) 40, (3) 42, (4) 44, (2),46. Long-Stout
— (3) 42, (3) 44, (2) 46, (2' 50 _ $42.75
l 1 21 ) $35 and $37.50 ALL-WOOL SUITS OF WORSTED CHEV
IOTS, FLANNELS, TWEEDS in a splendid assortment of patterns
and colors; single and double breasted models. Sizes' Regulars—
(2) 35, (2) 36, (3' 37, (5> 38, (10) 39, »71 40, (5) 42,
(5> 44. Short—(6) 37, (8) 38, )7) 39, (5) 40, (5' 42,
(3' 44. Long—(1) 37, <6' 39, (5) 40, (5) 42, I4i 44,
(3) 46. Stout—(1) 39, 13t 40, )4i 42, 13) 44, (li 46.
Long Stout—(1) 40, (1) 42, (1) 44, (1) 46_$31,75
(167) $39.50 ALL-WOOL COVERT SUITS in natural ton.
Also o limited group of tweeds and fine quality cheviots included.
Sizes: Regulors—(3) 38, • 4) 39, (3) 40. (4) 44, (2) 46.
Short—(li 35, (5) 36, (6) 37, (4) 38, < 71 39, (6*1 40, (2)
42, (2) 44, (21 46. Long—(2) 42, (3) 44, (5) 46. Stout—
ll) 40. Short-Stout—(I) 40__$34.75
AT REDUCTIONS FOR ANNUAL YEAR-END CLEARANCE
(34) $35 ALL-WOOL DONEGAL TWEED TOPCOATS. Also
fleeces, plain and novelty weaves included in the group. Sizes:
Regulars—< 3) 36, < 21 37, (3) 38, (4i 39, 13» 40, (8> 42,
'll 46. Short—ID 38, (2) 39, (1) 40, (2) 42. Long
l i 37, (2) 38, (1) 39, (I) 40_.... $23.75
(82) $35 TOPCOATS OF KNITTED WOOLS. FLEECES, TWEEDS,
in favorite styles, good assortment of colors and patterns. Sizes:
Regulars—(3) 35, (4) 36, (4) 37, (31 38, <4) 39, (5) 40,
(3) 42, (41 44, (2) 46. Short— (t) 35, (2i 37, (3) 38,
(4i 39, (4) 40, (5) 42. Long—(5) 37, (4) 38, I6i 39,
(5) 40, 14) 42, 13) 44, (4) 46_$28.75
(81) $35 to $37.50 HAND-WOVEN TWEED TOPCOATS, also
o limited number of domestic fleeces, tweeds and cheviots in
wanted colors and potterns. Sizes: Regulars—11) 34, (41 35,
(3) 36, (3) 37, (6i 38, (4) 39, (4) 40, (5) 42, (3) 44
(41 46, (1) 48. Short—(2) 36, (1) 37, (4) 38, (3 * 39
(3) 40, (4) 42. Long—(2) 37, (4) 38, (6) 39, (5 > 40.'
(3) 42, (3) 44, (3) 46_$31.75
(39) $39.50 to $45 TOPCOATS OF IMPORTED SCOTCH
TWEED m attractive heather and plain shades. Sizes: Regu
lars— (2) 35, (3) 36, (3) 37, (3) 38, <3) 39, (4» 40, (3)
42, (2144. Short—(1) 35, (1) 37, (2) 38, (2) 39, (3) 40.
' Long—() 38, (2) 40, (2) 42, (2) 44_$36.75
161) $50 TOPCOATS OF CAMEL'S HAIR AND WOOL in nat
ural and oxford shodes; single ond double breasted models with
set-in sleeve or raglon shoulders. Sizes: Regulars—(2) 35,
(4i 36, (5) 37, (3) 38, (2) 39, (3) 40, (3) 42, (4) 44.
Shorts—(2) 36, (2) 37, (1) 38, (3) 39, (4) 40, (3) 42.
Long—(1) 37, (4) 38, (4) 39, (5) 40, (3) 42, (2) 44,
(I) 46---$42.75
AT REDUCTIONS FOR ANNUAL YEAR-END CLEARANCE
(37) $35 ALL-WOOL FLEECE OVERCOATS in nntural, grays
ond blues. Single ond double breasted styles. Sizes: Regulars—
III 37, <2> 38, (31 39, (3 > 40, (6> 42, (21 44, (1) 46,
(1) 48. Short—(2) 39, (21 40, (4) 42. Long—(1) 38,
(2) 39, (3) 40, (21 42, (I) 44, il) 46_$26.75
(81) $35 and $39.50 WOOL OVERCOATS featuring warmth
without weight, fleeces, Worumbos and cheviots. Sizes: Regu
lars—(3) 36, (4) 37, (3) 38, (4) 39, (6) 40, (4) 42, (6)
44, (3) 46. Shorts—(1) 36, (4) 37, (5) 38, (4) 39, (4>
40, (3) 42. Long—(3) 37, (5) 38, (4) 39, (5) 40, (5)
42, (3) 44, (2) 46___$31.75
(57) $39.50 and $42.50 CHEVIOT OVERCOATS. Also a lim
ited group of velour finishes in plain and diagonal weaves, all
hondsomely tailored to Raleigh specifications. Sizes: Regulars—
(3) 36, (4) 37, (2) 38, (3) 39, (5) 40, (4) 42, (3) 44,
141 46, (1) 48. Short—(31 37, (I) 38, (11 39, (4) 40,
(I) 42. Long—(2) 37, (2) 38, (5) 39, (4) 40, (2) 42,
(1) 44, (1) 46--$36.75
<581 $45 and $50 OVERCOATS OF IMPORTED AND DOMES
TIC FLEECES AND CHEVIOTS. Superlative quality with hand
some tailoring. In a good selection of colors. Sizes: Regu
lars— (ll 35, <21 36, <4i 37, 14) 38, <4) 39, < 3) 42, <41
44, (7) 46. Short—III 37, <31 38, < 2) 39, (2) 40, (2)
42. Long—(1) 37, (I) 38, (2) 39, (3) 40, (6) 42, (I)
44, < I ) 46-$42.75
<46) $50 and $60 OVERCOATS OF IMPORTED SCOTCH
FLEECES with unsurpassed stamina and good looks. In favorite
colors. Sizes: Regulars (2) 36, (2) 37, (11 38, (41 39, (5)
40, (4) 42, (5) 44, (1) 46. Short—(3) 40, (2) 42. Long—
(1) 37, (1) 38, (3) 39, (1) 40, (6) 42, (5) 44....$48.75
$16.50 to $20 SPORT COATS in plaids, diagonals and
novelty weaves in a representative selection of colors
and sizes_ $12.75
l
Men’s Felt Hats
REDUCED FROM REGULAR STOCK
IT'prp $7.50
and $8.50
Fine fur felts in populor welt or bound-edge
brims. Broken sizes and colors.
*5 end *6.50 Fur Felt Hot*_*3.85
Welt, bound-edge brims; narrow, wide bands.
Incomplete sizes and colors.
RALEIGH HABERDASHER
WASHINGTON’S FINEST MEN’S WEAR STORE 1310 F S»r««t
1 . 1 *■ , . " m

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