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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 14, 1944, Image 11

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1944-03-14/ed-1/seq-11/

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Mr. Terrell, Recently of Dublin,
Speaks of Its Current Theater
Bv JAY CARMODY.
Mr. Daniel Terrell, who used to promote the arts as represented
In the product of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Loew s Inc., and related cre
ative peoples, has more recently been patronizing them as the Office
of War Information’s man in Dublin. For 10 months, he has been
attending the Abbey Theater, the Gate Theater and the movies in Eire’s
suddenly limelit capital. Of that, a kind of avocation, Mr. Terrell will
•peak freely, otherwise, he is ag
gressively clamlike.
"A very interesting institution,
the Abbey Theater in its native
habitat,’’ Mr. Terrell says as if he
would rather lecture than be both
ered answering questions. “I saw
a lot of it, as would any American
who had learned to love it during
"LOANS"
78 years of buying, selling and
lending on diamonds, jewelry, etc.
UWrtl Loans at Lowest Possible Rates
OLD GOLD BOUGHT
GOVERN MINT UCENSE EST. 1866
E. HEIDENHEIMER
|>rFI£« 1215 H St. N.W.
alexanSkFa. Va. HA. 1527
»--- ■ --- ---" --
the period of its prewar visits to
this country.
“It suffers, to get first to its suf
fering. from a death of playwrights.
In all the time I was there, it
produced only two new plays. The
latest one was a tragedy by Paul
| Vincent Carroll.”
It was suggested -to Mr. Terrell
that that should have been good.
“No,” he said, “it was not. I
found it more shadow than sub
stance, if I may make a pun. which
is what every one does after a few
months in Dublin—especially if he
has a tendency toward puns. The
I play was called ‘The Wise Have Not
i Spoken,’ a title that speaks an in
! dubitable truth if one but looks
I around the current scene. The play
I deals with the problem that has

■ , ?
been created because the wise failed
to speak, but after Mr. Carroll has
spoken for three acts, the problem
Is just where he picked it up. It
is musical speech and sometimes
filled with fury, but it signifies
[ nothing beyond Carroll's ability to
use words.”
Mr. Terrell's expression was rue
ful. The mood was upon him, how
ever. for just amoment.
“Did you know." he asked bright
ly. not unlike a Quiz Kid. “that the
Abbey Theater—the building, of
courise—is a converted morgue?
Also, it really is not a lot more com
fortable. The seats are the kind that
keep prodding you with the knowl
edge that the theater is an art,
not a place to loll around in deep,
springy upholstery as we do in our
movie palaces.”
* * * # •
Mr. Terrell did not mind the
seats, except by contrast with those
he used to fill so ably as press agent
for the Capitol and Palace Theaters.
He went regularly to the Abbey.
And he saw some fine revivals when
the theater could find no new ma
terial. He saw “Anna Christie,”
and “St. Joan.” and “Romeo and
Juliet.” Sheila Richards did the
latter two—she who used to play
with the Abbey Players on their
American tours. They were very
good, especially the Shaw play,
which the Irish enjoyed for its
barbed wit.
Mr. Terrell also went to the Gate
Theater, the Abbey’s rival. He
found it dilletantish, the sophisti
cated, somewhat haughty and arty
counterpart of the older institution.
“But,” he observes, “it is not
handicapped by notions that its
plays should make obeisance to the
determination of the Irish to have
their own language. Gaelic that
language would be in my book, but
they call it Irish, which they have
a perfect right to do.
"The Gaelic, or Irish, has to be
modernized, of course, to get into
touch with contemporary ideas. The
ancient Gaels, for instance, did not
have such instruments of communi
cation as the telephone. When
their modern descendants drop the
word for it into the old language,
spelling it ‘telefon,’ the effect is
funny when it shouldn’t be.’’
The OWI’s man does not think
the new lingual twist in the policy
of the Abbey will keep it away from
America after the war.
"They'll drop it long enough for
an occasional American tour,’’ he'
believes.
v * * *
Irish censorship is the big prob
lem of the American movie in Ire
land, Mr. Terrell reports. Any pic
ture dealing with the war is flatly
prohibited, even newsreels. That
eliminates dozens of top-flight fea
tures. Dublin’s standards of mo
rality toss out dozens of others.
"And they fool you on matters
of taste,” says Mr. Terrell. “I was
sure, for example, that the Irish
were just the sentimental people
to love Saroyan’s ‘The Human
Comedy.’ I was exactly 100 per
cent wrong. They found it sicken
ingly oversweet—the Irish, of' all
people.”
Dublin's taste in movie stars, he
found to be more conventional." It
runs most strongly to such people
as Greer Garson and Ray MUland,
both of Irish nativity. Fred Mac
Murray is another favorite, non
Irish, but Clark Gable is too rugged.
“Whimsical people," some one
suggested.
“So I’ve heard,” said Mr. Terrell.
Two Newcomers
As Newlyweds |
HOLLYWOOD.
On the “I Married a Soldier” set
over at 20th Century-Fox two of
filmland's newest, a pair of 18-year
olds. were about to begin a bedroom
scene. These youngsters, newlyweds
in the picture, are Jeanne Crain and
Frank Latimore.
The story is about Army wives
who follow their servicemen hus
bands from camp to camp prior to
being sent abroad.
^'A '
A---, te»M ,oW* *e ’oo4V'W^ *ca4V , V>°‘V
f™w .... '& $0^
Tot ^
1 I
HIGHER AND NEWER —The
process of glamourizing Mi
chele Morgan has been com
pleted and when you next see
her she will look something
like this. The film is “Higher
and Higherwhich opens Fri
day at Warner’s Earle.
Florence Frazer Gives
Delightful Recital
At Phillips Gallery
By ELENA DE SAYN.
Something new and delightful
by way of presenting music linked
to penned portraits of personages
and the era In which it was cre
ated. was given last night at the
Phillips Gallery by Florence Frazer,
plano-diseuse, who absorbed her
auditors by the engaging manner
of her delivery. A Philadelphian,
now residing in Washington, Miss
Frazer had an interesting career
in Europe and a long period of
study there and in this country.
In the four sections of her pro
gram, the artist gave an outlook on
the , musical situation in three
coutries, England, Germany and
France, in the 18th, 19th and
20th centuries, beginning with Lon
don in 1773. Her "Dr. Burney En
tertains" throws light on the type
of music in vogue there at the time
Mozart was the towering figure on
the European continent and brings
to the fore five English composers:
Arne Clark, Peter Lee of Putney,
Young and Dilbin, of that period,
whose charming pieces invite re
peated hearing.
To the most successfully per
formed selections of the evening
belong also the “Variations Seri
euse” by Mendelssohn, made alive
by Miss Frazer’s command of light
and shade and the spontaneity of
her approach. Recounting a page
from Mendelssohn’s biography at
the time of his moving to Berlin
from Leipzig, the pianist adroitly
brings in the names of his contem
poraries, Robert and Clara Schu
mann, Jenny Lind, Goethe,, Ferdi
nand David, the violinist, who be
came his successor as director of
the famous Gewandhous concerts.
The performance of Ravel’s "Son
atine” gave rise to interesting de
tails of Ravel’s daily life and habits
and acquainted with the interior
of his dwelling. The recital closed
with the description of Chopin’s
first meeting with George Sand,
famous novelist, whom he had in
mind when composing his "Scherzo
in B Flat Minor,1* the last number
on the program.
Claudette Considered
Mitch an Exception
HOLLYWOOD.
Claudette Colbert Is extremely
critical of any script. She reads
and rereads them before accepting
a part. However, Mitchell Leisen,
the director, called her recently and
said, “I would like to have you in
‘Practically Yours’ and I shall send
the script over immediately.” To
his surprise, Claudette answered,
"Never mind, Mitch, if you think
the part is right for me, I am sure
it is." Result: Claudette is now
working in ‘‘Practically Yours” op
posite Fred MacMurray—the last
picture for both on their old • lot,
Paramount.
(Released by the North American
Newapaper Alliance. Ine.)
No End to It
By the Associated Press.
HOLLYWOOD.
Just when you think the housing
problem out here couldn’t get any
worse, along comes a picture, "A
Bird Without a Nest.”
i
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing
Stage.
National — “Three's a Family”:1
8:30 p.m.
Screen.
Capitol — “Rationing”: 11 a.m.,
1:45, 4:30, 7:15 and 10 p.m. Stage
show: 1:05. 3:50, 6:35 and 9:20 p.m.
Columbia — "Song of Russia”:
11:15 a.m., 1:20, 3:20, 5:25, 7:25 and
9:30 p.m.
Earle—“In Our Time”: 11 a.m.,
1:45, 4:30, 7:15 and 10:05 p.m. Stage
show: 1, 3:45, 6:35 and 9:20 p.m.
Keith’s—"Gung Ho”: 11:15 a.m.,
1:25, 3:25, 5:30, 7:40 and 9:50 p.m.
Little—"Heart of a Nation”: 11:10
a.m., 1:20, 3:25, 5:30, 7:35 and 9:40
p.m.
Metropolitan—“The Desert Song ”:
11:25 a.m., 1:25, 3:30, 5:30, 7:35 and
9:40.
Palace—“A Guy Named Joe”:
11:30 a m., 2, 4:35, 7:05 and 9:40 p.m.
Pix—“Alibi": 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 and
9:55 p.m.
Trans-Lux — News and shorts:
Continuous from 10 a.m.
DANCING.
DAVISON’S
School will remain open for spring and
summer. Strictly private lessons for
beginners. Short courses.
TAP. TOE. BALLET. HEALTH EXERCISES
All South American Dances. Children’s
Classes.
MAE DAVISON
Teacher and Proprietor,
l.*I2» M St. N.W. at Thomas Circle
NATIONAL 3341
.
Every Tiles.-Erl.; Group Instruction Before
the Dance. r»Oe, plus tax; with lesson. Si.
Smooth floor, inspiring music, congenial
partners; romantic atmosphere.
No Escort Necessary
At these Studio Dances you find better
partners because those attending are more
interested in dancing than in drinkiiig.
Private Lessons at Your Convenience
Saturday night dances by invitation issued
only to good dancers and upon request, i
Canellis Dance Studios j
•*» v at. n.w. Diftritt i«ta
4
Shortage of Males Grows Acute
By HAROLD HEFFERNAN.
HOLLWOOD.
Critical leading-man shortage in
all studios received a fresh jolt to
day with reports that a score or
more stars and “name” players long
since rejected and placed in 4-F by
draft boards would be called back
for re-examination and possible re
classification in limited service.
Thus, the industry will face its
most critical summer program of
picture-making because the leading
man shortage even now is causing
the delay and actual shelving of a
number of pictures.
MGM and 20th Century-Fox, now
in the best shape for hero 4-F's,
may find their positions reversed
by the reclassification. Mickey
Rooney was accepted for duty after
re-examination. Alan Ladd, in the
Army several months and discharged
for physical reasons, is another im
portant star up for rechecking.
Classifications in 2-A, which are
six-month deferments, no longer
hold water in the studios. In the
last 10 days more than 300 studio
employes, who had been deferred
until the summer months, have been
reclassified 1-A. This ruling affects
family men in particular, especially
the actors.
Last week there were 34 feature
pictures shooting on all Hollywood
lots. From 40 .to 45 is the normal
total for this period of the year.
Casting troubles accounted in large
measure for the drop-off.
Established leading men are
going from one picture into an
other, without vacations. If every
leading man in town were triplets,
each triplet would be kept busy
month in and month out. so great
is the demand for fellows capable
of carrying the romantic burdens
in celluloid.
* * * *
Lauritz Melchior, Metropolitan
Opera star, who will make his film
debut in MGM's ‘•Thrill of a Ro
mance.” starring Van Johnson and
Esther Williams, has provided a
lot of comedy recently on radio
programs where he complains about
Frank Sinatra's salary and said he
was tired of "long hair and short
dough.”
He no doubt will introduce some
of this type comedy in his first film
but Joe Pasternak, who will pro
duce the picture, is mostly con
cerned about the type of songs
Melchior will sing in the production.
“We want this great artist to be
properly introduced to screen audi
ences," said Pasternak. “And we
would like to learn just what the
public would like to have him sing.”
Pasternak, who introduced Iturbi
to film fans and who was responsi
ble for the success of many of
Deanna Durbin's early pictures,
■■■■ 1 ■ ■ i —
AMUSEMENTS.
now HMimsa !;S
Tbm Next Sunday Mat. A Night
3 JOHN GOLDEN Preaenta
ISA FAMILY
Pt.tI.iiIt Titled
"THE HOME FRONT"
I Tee. Me. SI .11). (1.6A. S2.20. S2.7S
Wed. Mat., SSe. SI. 10. SI.SS
Sat.. Sun. Mate. SSe t. S2.20
ONE WEEK ONLY BEGTmON.
DIRECT FROM 17 WEEKS IN N. T.
BROCK PEMBERTON'S LAUGH RIOT
I
SEAT SALE THUHS.
Eve*. SSe. S1.10. SI.SS, S2.20. S2.7S
Bar re In Mat. Wed_SSe. 11.10. Sl.dS
■at. Mat. SSe. S1.10. SI.SS «.*#
Washington Choral Society
LOUIS A. FOTTEB. Conduct*.
TONIGHT, 1:30 P. M.
CONSTITUTION HALL
HONEGGER’S
“King David**
DEBUSSY’S
“The Prodigal Son**
Soloitttl
MAXIRI STELLMAN, Met S»r.n.
DONALD DAME, Met. Tenor
RODENT NICHOLSON, Baritone
HENRIETTE BAGGER PLUM,
Contralto
ISO Vsiess—Symphsny Orehsstra
ml (Jw Army flfuic School Choir
WM. STRICKLAND, Condnct.r
SEALS: SSe. SI.10, SI.SS. 82.20—
SNOW CONCERT BUREAU. 1108 O SI.
BE. 44SS
_AMUSEMENTS.
WRKO KEITH'S
P"' err u s. tmaiust • im m (
THE SCREEN'S GREATEST
GLORY STORYI
WALTER WANGER
THE BATTLE CRY
OF THI
MARINE RAIDERS1
RANDOLPH SCOTT
vp
WALT DISNEY'S
SNOW WHIT E
and the 7 Dwarfs
**********
—I WMAL Hourly Ntwteatt
EXTRA! EXTRA!
“RUSSIA’S FOREIGN POLICY”
Rtvealinr how Russia views her
friends—and her enemies
Midnicht Shew Every Saturday
j SUNDAY. 4 PM. I
I CONSTITUTION HALL |
RATIONAL SYMPHONY
HANS KINDLER. Coidactor
Final Sunday Concert
SCHUBERT, Symphony No. 7;
STRAUSS, Don Juan; RIEGGER, Pos
tacoglia ond Fugue World Premiere);
BORODIN, Polvettkian Dances, "Prince
Igor" <utth Chorut from N. Y. Ave.
Pretbvterian Church).
Seats: Me, SI. 10, *1.65, *2.20—Srm
»£°nr Bj» Offlee. KITT'S <NA. 7332)1
after 5:30 p.m. at WILLARD (NA. 5575) i
and SHOREHam (Ml. 0162) Hotels.
^Dcanta of tflace fIBou'crl
France's great director turns
a girl's mind into a labora- V
lory . .. pitting her every ■
emotion against her wiU... I
to break down a fatal liel |
| \ Mon poworfvl in its omoUonal im
poet than Horn Chonmti nemo- W,
roblC~Crimo ot Chatimont"! *
English Titlot |
L’ALIBI
ERICH von STROHEIM 5
|
i^D^jAMISOLIVIR
T&f CURWOOD’S ]
ftulMrowii&J
_ jH. RINTINTIN
Constitution Hall. Tomorrow at 8:30
C. Cappel Presents
Formerlr Prlaa Ballerina
Ballet Basse do Monte Carlo
Tickets: 65c. 1.10. 1.86. 2.20 Inc. tax.
On sale at Cappel Concert Bureau In
Ballard'S. 1340 O St. N.W., RE. 3603.
★ Buy more War Bonds *
Dows Open 10:30 a in
Warner bros: k
The DESERT SONG I
in TECHNICOLOR'tamng fijjjl
Dennis bene
Morgan. * Manning y,
MAT. A *ȴ*>' attraction
12 alynepayheTs
<« s .rnm^BSBMsUhi
Mld-NIte Shows Even Frl. A Sat.
--——————
I
MICHELE JACK RANK ’
MORGAN-HALEY-SINATRA
BEGINS WARNER BROS. PLUS
FRIDAY EARLE STAGESHOW
i i
would like to get suggestions. So.
if you feel you have a tip or two
along such a line, just drop it in
the mail to Joe Pasternak, MGM
| Studio, Culver City, Calif.
* * * *
Kaiser Wilhelm, II, appears
briefly in "Wilson”—so briefly, in
| fact, that the script gives him only
one line to say. But before he could
say that one line, the Kaiser had
to get acquainted with the German
language.
This unexpected circumstance
arose because of the fact that the
20th Century-Pox casting depart
ment decided that the likeliest man
to portray the Kaiser was Character
Actor George Sorel—the same
George Sorel who played Napoleon
several years ago in "Becky Sharp."
He was born in Russia and edu
cated in Prance, and spoke English
when he crossed Germany,
i Released by the North American Newt
_paper Alliance. Inc )
‘Bernadette’ Cycle
Bt the Aaaoclated Pres*.
Success of "Bernadette" has em
boldened producers to put the story
of Mother Cabrini in work. An
Italian nun, she founded hospitals
in America, manned by her order,
sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
She died in 1917 and has not yet
been canonized by the Catholio
church, although she has had sev
eral miracles ascribed to her.
AMUSEMENTS.
AMUSEMENTS.
- ' .. -.- ' 1 - ' - - JL»
III Wallace BEERY/‘The BRIDGE^!
•I in.TIAlillUMl m LUIS REY 1 i
Pit RATIONING V ~?l*» ON STAGE Jj
El -7u-..onstaci \ MARY RAYE M 1
■ | -miniatures” and NILIHil I
^ J|^^JORCH»< Tim • "Posi-U'ar Jobs?*^g™ HRLW^T JM
SECOND WEE^°c”‘,8,,il1 | j
C f Spencer TRACY* Irene DUNNE I
GUY NAMED JOE" I
iL^H^- ^HE SONG OF BERNADETTE” Jf
thumpay*^^p
|[ U.7 2 D,„ * Dtort »f** 10:41 \ ]
11 ROBERT T*TL0R<Th-jo-*WELLE* FONTAINE I
-JANE EYRE” (
TODAY'S NEIGHBORHOOD MOVIES
Buy War Bonds and Stamps at Any Local Theater.
1 CAROLINA FimShOW ft 5 AO 8pem.
’ 'RIO RITA.” ABBOTT and COSTELLO,
j KATHRYN ORAYSON. Also "FT YA
8AILOR,” DONALD WOODS and ELYSE
I KNOX.
CIRCLE 2193 be: oi*.NW'
GREER OARSON. WALTER PIDGEON In
I "MADAME CURIE. ' Open 4:45. Feature
| at 8. 7:15. 9:35._
I rnvcnree 2*31 Niehoia a*«. b.e.
lUnbllUB TR. 8700
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND. ROBERT CUM
MINGS In "PRINCESS O ROURKE. '
j At 6:15. 7:55. 9:40.
DUMBARTON 1349 wlM,on,'n *”
Two Main Pictures—Always a Bit Show.
CARY GRANT. LORai;nE DAY. Cr AS
BIGFORD in "MISTEP. LUCKY " Also
"O' MY DARLING ^CLEMENTINE."_
FAIRLAWN 1342 M SE
CARY GRANT, JOHN GARFIELD in "DES
TINATIOM TOKYO.” At U:'.'6, ■)._
mrrtinn T Greenbelt. Md.
UltUllBuUI Double Feature.
MAE WEST. VICTOR MOORE in “THE
HEAT'S ON/' and MILTON BERLE in
"OVER MY DEAD BODY. At 7 and 8:30.
HIGHLAND 2333 ftP’Vr “
GREER OARSON. WALTER PIDOEON in
“MADAME CURIE." At 6:35. 9.
V inn 3227 M St. N.W. WHITE ONLY.
liMJV Double Feature Protram.
•THE BOMBARDIER." Also “THAT
OTHER WOMAN.”
LITTLE
“The Heart of a Nation.”
niv 13th A H Sts. N.W.
■ M Continuous Ml.
“ADVENTURE IN BLACKMAIL" and "NA
BONGA."
_I K-B THEATERS
LOUIS BERNHEIMER S THEATERS _
ARLINGTON * ALLS CHURCH. VA.
Information Phone Oxford I 139—F. C. 1555. ________
nnrv * Mass. Ave. N W.
iirtnik Woodley 4ttllfl
Take the Croastown or N-‘* Bos
Dire'-t Is Door
GREER GARSON. WALTER PID
OEON In "MADAME CURIE." Also
Car oon and Late News. Doors Open
at H:15. Feature at 7, P:35.
£rt? Rf> 1.131 H St. N E AT WOO.
. * : I Cootin’-ors I to It PM
Double Feature
CARY GRANT, JOHN GARFIELD In
"DESTINATION TOKYO 1 Also MA".
WEST. WILLIAM GAXTON. VICTOR
MOORE In "THE HEAT'S ON."_
DBIwmc I tin h st. n.e.
rilll'bl'.S XR. 9300.
Continuous 1 to 11 P.M.
Double Feature.
A Thrill and Horror Show.
"DR CYCLOPS, with ALBERT
DECKER. Also "THE MAD DOC
TOR." with BASIL RATHBONE.
CrilHTnn Minn. Ave. at Bennlns
aCsRAlUn Rd. N.E. TB 3600.
ROSALIND RUSSELL and BRIAN
AHERNE In "WHAT A WOMAN."
Extra Hit! VERA VAOUE In "DR.
FEEL MY PULSE." Doors Open at
6. Feature at 6:15. 8:10. 10.
THE VILLAGE «?££
Phone MTrh. 9227.
“MADAME CURIE,”
GREER OARSON. WALTER PID
_GEON.
NEWTON 1 nd Newton.
Phone Mich. 1839.
“LOST ANGEL,”
MARGARET O'BRIEN and JAMES
_CRAIG_
JESSE "HE*VE«
Phone Dll. 9861
“GOVERNMENT GIRL.”:
OLIVIA DE HAVII LAND. SONNY
TUI'T.e
“Gentleman After Dark,”,
BRIAN DONLEVY and MIRIAM
__HOPKINS.
DVT V&ll *»* St J R, 1. Are. N.W 1
a till Hr Phone NOrth 96811
Double Feature
“The Cross of Lorraine,”
PIERRE AUMONT. GENE KELLY 1
“YOU’RE A LUCKY
FELLOW, MR. SMITH,”
ALLAN JONES. EVELYN ANKERS
S& VERNON ;^7 m&WZ
One Block from Presidential Gardens. ,
Phone Alex. 2424.
Free Parkins in Rear of Theater
“GOVERNMENT GIRL,”
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND. SONNY
_TUFTS._
DAI M Ml Vernon Ave.
rm.n Alev Va Alex. 0767. i
CLAUDIA,”
ROBERT YOUNG and DOROTHY I
_McOUIRE.__
ACADEMY
Double Feature.
“IN OLD CHICAGO.” i
AUCE FAYE. TYRONE POWER
“THE RACKET MAN,”
TOM NEAL, JEANNE BATES !
STANTON 5,2lcigi,"x~i
«viru- ,,r?oubl«. Feature
Whistling in Brooklyn,”
REG.rS??LT9,N. ANN RUTHERFORD
THE SAINT MEETS
THE TIGER,”
—gOZgH-SINCLAIR. JEAN jQTT.t.ts j
STATE Shows 7 and 9
SULLA- i
I.VP A Treat for the Entire-Family
ARLINGTON
"CROSS OF LORRAINE" PIFRR?
AUMONT. GENF. KEUY LIFRRE
wilson v&rsr IssF""•
SON.PWALTER*PIDOEorLEER' GAR'
ASHTON 3166 Wilson Blvd.
fIyI CAR^N^RA^"
BUCKINGHAM
ru&AeTllAbriOT&rneROSAUND
1
For Additional information
Phone Theaters Direct
BUY WAR BONDS AMD STAMPS AT WARHEB BBOS. THEATEES
j In the Event of Busy Signal
I Call REvublic OSOU
All Time Schedule* Given In Warner
Brea. Ads Indicate Time Feature |i
Presented.
Theaters Having Matineaa.
AMBASSADOR i®.
r„. Mat. 1 P.M.
IDA LUPINO PAUL HENREID In
"IN OUR TIME." At 1:30, 4:10. 6:50.
(1:35. "Heavenly Music." Academy
Award Short_
BEVERLY u ^*mWp*.
SEWmBSMA*** m0t
3:05. 5:lu. 7:15. 9:20. Cartoon._
PfilVFRT &Z4 -wit. Ave. M.W.
TAL?™1 WO. 2315. Mat. I P.M.
JOHN WAYNE. SUSAN HAYWARD In
"FIOHTING 8EABE3S.” At 1:20.
3:25, 5:25 7:30. 1)::)5.__
CENTRAL
WARGARErOBRna? JAMES CRAIG
in "LOST ANGEL" At 11, lT*5. 4:30,
7:15. 10. TOM CONWAY tn "FAL
CON AND COEDS." At 12:40. 3:25.
O^UO. o!60.
KENNEDY N£.4,ul ?;Z:
ALICE FAYE in “THE OANO’8 ALL
HERE." 1 20. 3:20. 6:28, 7:28, 9:30.
PENN f£-8&8: *J«.IVA.
DOROTHY LAMOUR^ DICK POWELL
fin30 7^30 9”o0tM.rch oiSItar
SHERIDAN
OREER GARSON. WALTER PID
crog " At
Bsr, °»h .Vi5b«*co«f:te
GREER GARSON. WALTER PID
CUR«" 5*
Tfir«» » ' *'h * Park Rd. N.W.
CO 1803 Mat 1 P.M.
np-ne*™ L«MOvrvj povELL
in T.ipiNO HIGH" (In Technicolor).
At l5..». 3:35. 5:40, 7:40. 0:45. Dls
n** ' Cflt,!con.
Conn. Ave. A Newark
... WO. 5*00 Mat. 1 P.M.
■..9T': " SUSAN HAYWARD in
••FTOrmwa 9FABEE3.” At 1. 3:10,
5:20 7:30. 9:45.
Theaters Having Eve. Performance!
APnun 6vs«NI
HERE*’* ItA^55ln9:05°ANG 8 AIi
AVALON 86,3 w8n2^w: N W>
GREER GARSON. WALTER FID
OEON ‘,n MADAME CURIE.” At
n^45. P:20.
AVE. CBAND ■*
ENORTHERNNNpURSUrr.”ISIAtP Jf
COLONY 4938 &;,£». N W
JT°OHKNYOdA^iI5EL0D21o'*
momt; 133’?rc8s,188nb
IRVING BERLINS "THIS IS THE
LW’OEOBO,i
SAVOY 3030co4‘h4flSkN W
NELSON EDDY. SUSANNA FOSTER
In "PHANTOM OF THE OPERA." At
nils &iOJ>. f>;55.
t^FPII 8214 Ga Ave.. Silver Sprini
• - ■!’ SH. 25-10.
EINO CROSBY DOROTHY LAMOUR
in "DIXIE Atr ft: 1 5 9:30. PIERRE
AUMONT GENE KELLY in "CROSS
OF LORRAINE.” AL H. Cartoon
T AK0M* 4th
MARV MARTIN FRANCHOT TONB
in "TRUE TO LIFE." 0:15. 8. 9:55.
VPV ' G» Ave. A Qnebee PI. S.W.
RA. 4100.
MAE WEST VICTOR MOORE In
"HEATS ON ” 0:30. 0:05 0 45
-SIDNEY LOST THEATERS
BETHESDA Bethe«da”*Ma.*T*' I
Wl. ?868 or Brad 9636.
Today-Tomor.—At 6:35. 8:39.
GREER GARSON and
WALTER PIDGEON in
“MADAME CURIE.”
HIPPODROME
Today-Tomor.—Double Feature.
RICHARD ARLEN. JEAN PARKER In
"ALASKA HIGHWAY." LIONEL
GILLESPIE' 3* CR?MINALR C ASt “ DR'
CAMEO 34th \\ 'ote7*1
Cont. 6.30-11:30—Double Feature.
Last Complete Double show 9:110
EHROL FLYNN, JULIE BISHOP in
"NORTHERN PURSUIT." FRANCES
LANGFORD. EDWARD NORRIS m
"CAREER GIRL.” ln
HYATTSVIM.E KKS8J®:
Lnion 1230 or Hyatts. 0552.
DORPX^X LAMOUR. DICK POWELL
HIGH" (Tech.) At 6:15.
o.iu, iu:(>5.
MILO RockyMIe. _Md. Roek. 181.
GREER GARSON. WALTER PIDGEON.
“MADAME CURIE.”
MARLBORO ~°BD"!5&!b?r Mi
Today-Tomor—At 7 20. !): 17
MARGARET SULLAVAN. and ANN
SOUTHERN In
“CRY HAVOC.”
ALEXANDRIA, VA.
Rrrn free parking.
IICiEiII Phone Alex. 3445.
EDDIE BRACKEN. BETTY HUTTON la
MIRACLE OF MORGAN'S,, CREEK.”_
RICHMOND p&'&TCLi
7HARLES STARRETT. JANE FRAZER,
VERA_VAGUE_ln_COWBOY CAN1EEN ~
UISER-BETHESDA
Bethesda. Ml
Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland
in “GIRL CRAZY.”
Also News and Short Subjects

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