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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 14, 1944, Image 4

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Red Aerial Assaults
In Latvia and Estonia
Point to New Drive
St the Associated Pres*.
LONDON (Sunday), May 14.—
The Soviet high command an
nounced last night that Russian
bombers attacking German military
trains and stores at Daugavpils
(Dvinsk> in Latvia and Tartu in
Estonia had touched off violent ex
plosions and fires Friday night in a
possible prelude to a fresh Red Army
northern offensive.
The German high command also
Indicated that Russian troops in
force had smashed across the Mol
dava River, 60 miles inside Ro
mania, when It told of fighting
between Romanian soldiers and a
full Soviet rifle division on the west
bank of that river.
The Moldava is a western tribu
tary of the Siret, joining the larger
river 35 miles southwest of Iasi.
Moscow never has claimed a cross
ing of the Moldava, but last month
announced the capture of Falticeni
near Its east bank.
linestr Front News Lacking.
Neither the Germans nor the
Russians made new mention of the
lower Dnestr River sector near
Tiraspol where Berlin had declared
that a Russian bridgehead had been
erased and where Moscow said Ger
man counterattacks had failed.
No essential changes occurred on
the long land front. Moscow said.
For some time German broad
casts have suggested the Russians
were mounting another big-scale
offensive in Northern Estonia where
the Red army holds positions near
Narva, and opposite Latvia where
the Russians were reported within
five miles of Pskov on March 3.
The Moscow bulletin recorded by
the Soviet monitor here said ex
plosions and flames enveloped a
substantial part of Daugavpils rail
junction, 115 miles southeast of
Riga, after the Friday night blow.
11 Explosions Observed.
Eleven explosions, one of them
enormous, and 10 fires were observed
amid trains and stores at Tartu,
100 miles southeast of the Estonian
capital of Tallinn and 65 miles
northwest of Pskov, the bulletin
said.
The Germans still reported fight
ing on Cape Khersones, west of
Sevastopol in the Crimea, but the
Russians said the last enemy rem
nants had been wiped out there
Friday.
Italy
i Continued From First Page.)
Army, congratulated Gen. Alphonse
Juin. the French commander. “You
are proving to an anxiously await
ing France that the French Army
has returned, sacred to its finest
fighting traditions,” Gen. Clark told
him.
Grim fighting developed at every
point where the Allies made pene
tration; into the formidable de
fenses and the Germans lashed out
in a series of determined, but costly,
counterattacks.
Gains Up to 3 Miles.
During the day Allied headquar*
ters officially announced gaihs of a'
mile and a half and front dispatches
later told of advances of 2 to 3
miles at some points.
The first prisoners began filing
into the Allied lines on various
sectors.
Sector by sector here are the high
spots in the official accounts of the
first day of the offensive yesterday:
1. North and west of Mintumo,
on the sector nearest the Tyrrhen
ian Sea. American troops captured
four strategic hills from which the
Germans previously were able to
pour devastating fire against Allied j
forces advancing across the Lower
Garigliano valley. Two counter
attacks against the newly-gained
positions were repulsed.
2. American infantrymen, sup
ported by tanks, advanced a mile
northward and captured the village
of Ventosa, Damiano Hill and an
other 1,000-foot peak from the Ger
mans in a stiff battle, gaining foot
holds west of Castelforte. San
Sebastiano. a third village near
Castelforte, also was taken.
French Take Monte Faito.
3. French troops on the 5th
Army’s right wing swarmed up the
2.550-foot heights of Monte Faito,
which anchors the Gustav Line's
outer fortifications in the Upper
FIVE TOWNS FALL TO ALLIES IN ITALY—American forces
have driven deeper into the Gustav Line in JJaly, capturing
Ventosa and Santi Cosmos e Damiano in the vicinity of
Castelforte, which the Germans said they had evacuated. In
addition, Cercobi and San Sebastiano, also near Castelforte
but not shown on the map, were taken. French forces seized
Mount Faito and British 8th Army troops captured the town
of Sant’ Angelo. The British also took Mount Albenetto,
northeast of Cassino. (Story on Page A-l.>—A. P. Wirephoto.
Garigliano Valley, and then cap
tured the surrounding heights,
smashed a violent counterattack
and pushed on.
4. Under incessant fire of Ger
man guns installed for miles back
along the Liri Valley, 8th Army
troops secured a bridgehead across
the Rapido River in close, contact
with the foremost enemy defenses
and built bridges to bring over guns
and supplies for the next step in
the sector south of Cassino. .
5. Swinging south and west from
the sector to the north of Cassino,
troops of the 8th Army fought bit
terly with German parachute troqpe
for Monte Albanetto and the ad
joining mountains two miles west
of Cassino. They had at least an
other mile of the toughest kind of
going before they could hope to
crash down into the Liri Valley from
the north and menace the enemy
holding Cassino from the rear.
A dispatch from Associated Press
Correspondent Lynn Heinzerling
with the 8th Army on the Cassino
front said fighting was particularly
intense today around Sant’ Angelo.
He said German guns were quite
active and troublesome and that
their mortar fire along the river
line was causing some casualties.
Major Accomplishment.
Capture of Monte Faito by the
French was considered one of the
major accomplishments of the first
day of the drive, since it was
the strongpoint on Which.,the anemy
hinged his first Hnr bastions in
that area.
An authoritative military spokes
man cautioned against undue opti
mism over the initial gains both
north and south of Cassino, how
ever, declaring that much - grim
lighting lay ahead before the Ger
man defenses in those areas could
be pierced. He said the Germans
had constructed many pillboxes
and converted houses into miniature
forts.
Mr. Heinzerling's dispatch de
scribed the first prisoners coming
into the 8t,h Army's cages behind
the Rapido River as a tired, be
grimed motley group wearing ill
fitting, baggy uniforms. He said
they threw themselves on the ground
behind barbed wire and dozed in the
hot midday sun. Many of the Ger
mans he added, were veterans of
the battle for Sicily.
Nazi In Cassino Unmolested.
Although the fighting was grim
both north and south of Cassino,
the Germans inside the battered
town itself were left unmolested.
In the Anzio beachhead sector and
on the Adriatic coastal line, only
patrolling and artillery duels were
reported.
For the second successive day the
15th Air Force's heavy bombers left
undisturbed the more remote stra
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tegic targets and concentrated on
blasting rail centers.
After a complete absence from
the battle area yesterday the Nazi
Air Force reappeared today. North
of Gaeta Spitfires met 22 Focke
Wulf 190s and shot down three.
Near Valmontone Warhawks met
18 to 20 FW-190s and 8 to 10
ME-109s. They shot down two
Messerschmitts at a loss of three
Warhawks.
OPA' Eases Oil Ration
Rules for Householders
By the Associated Presi.
The Office pf Price Administra
tion ruled yesterday that beginning
tomorrow and continuing through
September 30, householders can ob
tain fuel oil rations for oil cooking
stoves and hot-water heaters even
though they may have a coal or
wood-burning stove available. A
similar rule was in effect last sum
mer.
OPA said that while there is an
over-all shortage of all fuels, oil
units of this type can be used
more economically during the
summer.
Wounded Flyer,
Doomed, Crashes
J Deliberately
Br Hie Associated Press.
A NINTH AIR FORCE FIGHTER
BASE IN ENGLAND, April 24 (De
layed).—Thunderbolt Pilot Lt. John
P. Hayden, severely wounded in a
raid over Munich and knowing he
was doomed, calmly, told his com
rades over the radio telephone: “My
arm is shot off—I’m going in.”
"Going in” meant he was going
to crash.
Other pliots reported they saw
the plane of the 23-year-old flyer
from Newton Center, Mass., crash
into a hillside. His plane was one
of a quartet of Thunderbolts that
engaged six Messerschmitts in a
running fight.
Before he crashed. Lt. Hayden
assisted in blasting one of the Mes
serschmitts out of the air.
Atom Being *\
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Musical Interludes i
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Never a Cover Charge A
Sunday, May 14th A
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ROAST PRIME RIBS OF l
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LOBSTER SALAD, Hard /
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Allied Bombers Pound
Jap Bases and Troops
In North New Guinea
Bs- the Associated Press.
ADVANCED ALLIED HEAD
QUARTERS. New Gtf%ea. Sunday,
May 14.—Allied bombers have heav
ily bombed Japanese bases and troop
concentrations in Northern New
Guinea, Gen. Douglas MacArthur
announced today.
Mokmer airdrome on Biak Island,
260 miles north of captured Hol
landia in Dutch New Guinea, was
hit twice by Liberators on Friday.
Biak is in the Schouten group.
One of the attacking Liberators
was shot down by enemy anti-air
craft fire.
Timor Attacked.
Other planes from Gen. MacAr
thur's air forces, ranging west of
New Guinea, hit Timor and Boeroe
airdromes.
Wewak, bypassed Japanese base
in British New Guinea, also was
attacked.
Tire first Biak raid brought up
no Japanese interceptors and other
heavy bombers came back later with
fighter escort, but still the enemy
did iyt attempt to send up fighters.
Ground troops, mopping up in
the Hollandia-Aitape areas, which
was invaded April 22, have killed
101 additional Japanese and in
creases their unprecedented bag of
prisoners by 30.
354 Japs Captured.
This brings the total of enemy
dead in the area to 1,716 and the
number of captured to 354. These
enemy troops fled inland at the
time of the invasion.
Australian troops, working their
way to the New Guinea coast from
Alexishafen toward the Hollandia
Aitape area, pressed 5 miles past
Nape Croisilles. They reached
Meigar plantation, 30 miles from
Madang.
Yesterday’s communique told of
an aerial foray into the area of the
Palau Islands, Japans naval base
about 500 miles from the Philip
pines
Southwest Pacific patrol planes
strucx 300 miles east of Palau, dam
aging an enemy' freighter. It was
the first time that Gen. MacArthur
had included the Palau sector in
his communique.
Japanese-Held Positions
In Marshalls Raided
PACIFIC FLEET HEADQUAR
TERS, May 13 (JF).— Army, Navy
and Marine bombers carried out
day and night raids on the remain
ing Japanese-held positions in the
Marshall Islands on Thursday, the
Navy reported tonight.
The Pacific fleet announcement
told of hits on runways, anti
aircraft batteries and barracks. A
marine divebomber was shot down,
but its crew was rescued by an
American destroyer.
Idaho Man Appointed
Mines Bureau Assistant
B> the Associated Press.
George A. Lamb of Pocatello,
Idaho, has been appointed by In
terior Secretary Ickes to be assist
ant director of the Bureau of Mines.
Mr. Lamb, 38, was graduated from
the University of Portland (Oreg.l
n
Value* in
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Guitar dl'W
Continental AA FA
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U. S. Flame Throwers Clean Out
Machine-Gun Nests in Thrust
EIGHTH EVACUATION HOS
PITAL. ITALIAN FRONT, May 13.—
During the second night of the Al
lied attack, American flame throw
ers were used to dislodge German
machine-gun nests and pockets of
resistance that were impeding the
progress of our infantry and in some'
rocky sectors were stopping it cold.
Casualties arriving in the dawn
told of seeing whole squads of Ger
mans incinerated by molten Are
from the flame throwers. Those
who survived leaped from cover and
were cut down by Americans armed
with Tommy guns before they could
take three steps.
One private fn©m Newark, N. J„
who handled a flame thrower, gave
a graphic description of flghting
along the moonlit slopes and the
terrible destruction of the chemical
flame that incinerates anything it
hits.
His company had been stopped
and was being mowed down by a
hidden machine gun. Second It.
Howard D. Sharman, Memphis.
Tenn., called for flame throwers
and directed the fire on the "i**”
gun post, a sort of Inverted faatoote
built with rocks above the pound.
“Our flame throwers weigh W
pounds and have a terrific recoil
unless you lean into it,” the private
said. “Men were dropping all areond
us, but they stopped dropping after
I got in the first burst.
“I ‘basted’ the target first with
liquid, then when it was well wet
ted down. I ignited it. This creates
a vacuum and sucks the flame
through all the crevices and kills
everything it touches.” •
He said flame “sort of rolled along
the ground” as he fired short bursts
and then the pillbox seemed to be
enveloped in flame. Three Ger
mans managed to leap out, but were
shot instantly. After that the com
pany moved forward and ooeupied
the hill, which was covered with
dead Germans.
“I counted 33 lying there, but
there must have been a lot more
than that,” he sfld.
Nazi Disturbers Moved
From Michigan Camp
Er the Associated Press.
MILWAUKEE, May 13—Several
Nazi prisoners of war. all non-com
missioned officers, were transferred
from Camp Sidnaw, Mich., to Camp
Alba, Okla., last Thursday because
of “repeated efforts on their part to
make trouble among other prisoners
of war” engaged there on the pulp
wood cutting project, Col. William
H. McCarthy, commanding officer
of the Wisconsin and Upper Michi
gan Peninsula District of the Sixth
Service Command, stated today.
Some of the prisoners of war,
who were not moved, refused to
report for work during the afternoon
because of sympathies toward the
transferred men, Col. McCarthy
said.’ However, this did not result
in any other incidents, and no
offense of a court martial nature
occurred.
There is a curse in your purse
and a wallop in your wallet. Let
the Axis have it—through-an extra
bond.
Blood Donor Day Set
Blood donor day for the Chew
Chase branch of the Red Cross has
been set for May 26 at the Chevy
Chase Woman’s Club, from 9 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. A nursery will be main
tained to care for small children.
For appointments call Mrs. Frank
Ayer, Oliver 1879. or Mrs. Roger
Whiteford, Wisconsin 4041.
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