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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 20, 1944, Image 7

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29 More Jap Ships
Sunk; U. S. Loses Sub,
Two Other Warcraft
The Navy today balanced the
loss in action of a submarine and
minesweeper against the de
struction of 29 more Japanese
vessels, including 3 warships. An
auxiliary transport also was re
ported lost in the Pacific as the
result of a collision with another
ship.
The Navy announcement late yes
terday indicated there was no loss
of life aboard the 1,525-ton sub
marine Flier. Casualties were de
scribed as "very small" on the
minesweeper Perry, while no one
was injured or killed when the
transport Noa went down.
The Japanese ships fell victim to
American submarines and repre
sented the biggest haul to date
by United States undersea craft
In addition to two destroyers and
an escort vessel, the fa test bag of
sinkings included 23 cargo or trans
port craft and three tankers. It
raised to 931 the number of Japa
nese craft of all types sunk or dam
aged by American subs since the
war started.
Details of I^tss Withheld.
The need for withholding infor
mation from the enemy clouded
with mystery the loss of the Flier,
which brought to 30 the number of
American submarines lost in the
war.
Comdr. John Daniel Crowley of
Springfield, Mass., was in command,
but the brief Navy announcement
withheld details of the sinking, say
ing only that the vessel was lost
"in recent action" and that "next
of kin of officers and men" had
been notified.
The department did say, in re
sponse to questions, that Comdr.
Crowley is a survivor.
The wording, the Associated Press
pointed out, was contrary to cus
tomary language of communiques
reporting loss of submarines. Ordi
narily they are listed as “overdue
and presumed lost" when they fail
to return from a war patrol, and
then the Navy adds “next of kin of
all casualties have been notified."
Believed Attacking in Marianas.
The Flier, it was believed, was part
of a force attacking the Japanese
in the Western Pacific Marianas.
The minesweeper Perry, the Navy
reported, was lost in action during
the present operations in the Palau
Islands, where ground forces are
battling the Japanese. She was
commanded by Lt. William N. Lind
say, jr.. New Haven, Conn., who is
listed as a survivor. The Perry car
ried a crew of about 120 officers and
men.
The transport Noa sank after a
collision with an American destroy
er in the Pacific. She carried a
crew of about 120. under Lt. Comdr.
Henry Wallace Boud, Beachwood, N.
J. Both the Perry and the Noa were
converted World War destroyers.
750 U. S. Prisoners Losf
In Ship Sinking, Japs Say
By the Associated Pits*.
A Japanese Domei news agency
broadcast says that 930 war prison
ers, including 750 identified as Amer
icans, perished in the torpedoing of
two Japanese transports in the
; Southwest Pacific.
The broadcast, beamed to Europe
and recorded Sunday by FCC, quot
ed front-line dispatches received in
Tokyo as saying that the American
prisoners and the Japanese crew
were lost when a transport was
sunk by an enemy submarine off
Mindanao, in the Philippines, on
September 7.
The news agency said it had been
revealed, without identifying the
source, that 180 war prisoners were
: killed in the sinking of a transport
i off Sumatra on June 26. Five hun
dred and forty other prisoners
! aboard, the broadcast said, were res
cued.
I ___
Bombed Nazi Installation
Was to Destroy London
By the Associated Press.
PARIS, Sept. 20.—Tlie newspaper
Parisian Libre reported from Arras
yesterday that Germans had told
peasants In that vicinity that their
huge and mysterious installation
near Watten, destroyed by Allied
bombs, was intended to house a
! secret weapon which would demolish
London.
Five thousand workers toiled for
months in building this installation
despite some of the most intensive
bombings of the war. The Ger
mans claimed, the newspaper said,
that it also was to house "death
ray” machines capable of stopping
airplane engines.
The Wfttten installation was first
revealed by the construction of a
mysterious tower. This was a secret
target for United States Flying For
tresses based in England through
out 1942.
The Allied planes blasted the spot
so thoroughly in 33 subsequent raids
'that the resulting destruction
astounded Army troops who first
saw it after the area was captured
from the Germans.
They get medals and wooden
crosses; we buy War Bonds.
Vichy Laws Remain,
Paris Paper Charges
By the Asioclated Press.
PARIS, Sept. 20 —The Paris news
paper Front National charged yes
terday that some Vichy government
ordinances still were being enforced
by Nazi-minded Fiench administra
tive officials as the purge of col
laborationists swept ahead with un
abated clamor.
"Fiance without a doubt is gov
erned by Gen. de Gaulle, but it is
still administered by too many func>
tionaries devoted to Petain ana
Laval—that is to say, Hitler,” the
paper declared.
Front National specifically
charged that demands were still
being made for payment of the
"metal tax,” a levy initiated under
Nazi auspices whirh required money
payments for failure to contribute
annual quotas of non-ferrous scrap
metal.
Competent officials admitted issu
ing “invitations” for continuation
of the quota contributions, but de
nied suggesting penalties for non
compliance.
Daily arrests of industrialists,
politicians and writers accused of
collaboration run from 10 to 20, but
total figures are not available.
The mounting number under de
tention has not stopped the clamor
foi sterner measures, however.
Hen Lays Five Eggs in Day
1 LOS ANGELES UP).—C. A. Dil
lings’ red hen laid five eggs in one
day, two medium size, three a little
smaller.
COOP NEWS
LUMBER AVAILABLE
Without Priorities
(in limited amounts)
I. S. TUROVER
Bethesdo, Md.
Wl. 6622
Yes, her SALTINES
are always by
KEEBLER
' /If
Girls-be smart!*

A beautiful tuxedo eeat like this—at this sen
sationally low price—could only com# from
Wonder Clothes, the Factory store! Beautifully
styled to wear several seasons—in 100% wool,
♦rimmed with mouton lamb. Fabric colors le
fuchsia, jade green, brown or grey.
s54,!
T NO TAX
CONVENIENT TERMS
937 F ST. N.W.
Its smart to buy at a factory store!
Roger H. Ferger Nafted
Cincinnati Enquirer Head
Bt the Associated Press.
CINCINNATI, Sept. 20.—Roger H.
Ferger, who operated his own ad
vertising agency at 22 and became
advertising manager of the Cincin
nati Enquirer at 26, was named as
its publisher yesterday to succeed
William F. Wiley, who died August
25.
Announcement of the appoint
ment was made by the American
Security & Trust Co., Washington,
trustee for the estate of John R.
McLean, which owns the Enquirer.
Mr. Ferger, 50, and a native of
Cincinnati, has been acting pub
lisher since Mr. Wiley’s death.
Villa Rosa Acquisition
Opposed by Haycock
Robert L. Haycock, superintendent
of schools, yesterday advised Chair
man Randolph of the House District
Committee he was opposed to acqui
sition by the District government
of the Villa Rosa estate as a means
of preserving the children's museum
there.
He joined with the Commissioners
in the view that such a museum
should be operated as a private or
ganization rather than as a munici
pal activity. Mr. Haycock said the
museum had proved valuable in
affording after-school educational
opportunities to children, but held it
would be inconsistent to authorize
the Commissioners to buy the prop
erty at public expense.
-NEY’S
LIQUOR STORE
...3 Pa. Ave. N.W
AMANDIO ’S
RUBY PORT
A fine full-bodied wine that
speaks of perfect grapes and
matchless |kill of the old mas
ters of Portugal’s fine wineries.
also TAWNY and FULL
Alcohol
By Vol.
20%
| 1 Pint, 7 oz.
Shop Thursday at The Mode, 12 Noon 'til 9 P.M.
Richard Prince Tweeds
For Gentlemen of Good Taste
You’re smartly dressed for fall in a casual, rough and ruddy
Richard Prince Tweed. You’re ready for brain work or
casual hours in a herringbone, check or solid pattern tweed.
These are superbly tailored suits of 100% wool. See your
self today in a Richard Prince Tweed ... the suit that
makes the rounds . . . and exclusively with The Mode.
Other Richard Prince Fall Suits_38.75 to $45
Famous Stetson
“Premier”
The smooth lines and nice pro
portions flatter almost every
face. See them at The Mode.
Ottoer Stetson* . . . 7.50 to $20
4
Open Thurtday Night Until 9 P.M.
SENSATIONAL
DD-LOT
CLEARANCE!
Of the World's Finest
Nationally Known Brands
ARMY & NAVY OFFICERS'
UNIT RMS
For the past several months we have been purchas
ing complete retail stocks from some of America’s
largest retailers who decided to quit the Army &
Navy business! We made sensational “buys” and
we’re selling the same way. Almost anything Mili
tary at lower-than-ever prices! Here is a partial listi
ARMY OFFICERS' UNIFORMS
Full regulation 17 and 19 ounce Elastique and Bara
thea Blouses. ALL NATIONALLY KNOWN MAKES.
$32.50 BLOUSES... _ .Now *22.50
$37.50 BLOUSES... . .Now *25.00
$42.50 BLOUSES.Now <32.50
SLACKS—Dark Green . .Now *10.00
SLACKS—Pink.Now $12.00
Mackinaws, All-Wool Doeskin, $25.00
(Large Sites Oaly)
148 ARMY AIR CORPS
Regularly $32.50 All Wool
ELAST10UE „
BLOUSES—. 12
RAINCOATS REDUCED!
*14.95 Coats—*9.95 $24.59 Coats__*14.50
ARMY OmiERS' CATS
50% orri
Were $5.00 Were $9.95 Were $12.50
*2.50 *4.85 *6.25
Fantous Nationally Known Brand of
OFFICERS' SHIRTS REDUCED
“Jayson,” “Van
Heusen.” “Arrow,”
“Liondale,” “Hath
away,” “Troy,”
1.99
Were $3 to $3.95
Extra-fine Broad
cloth! Burton’s
Irish Poplin! 62
Clinir Cloth! Gen
uine 2-ply Poplin.
Wel-known Leon
ard Tropical Wool
“Brook" Weares,
Gabardine* and
Tropical*,
3.99
War, $8.95
Fe a t u r i n g 20'/r
wool and 80^o
rayon.
100% All - W o o I
Form - Fashioned
Tropicals and
100% All-Wool
Gabardines and
Serje,
6.99
Worm $5.95
to S 12.50
“Jayson,” "Yale,”
“Jackson R a y
mond,” "Leonard,”
NAVAL OFFICEHS' UNIFORMS
$40 All-Wool Uniforms_ now $27.50
$40 All-Wool Raincoats-.-— now $27.50
$65 All-Wool Bridge Coati_ now $45.00
OHicen' Cap, Bine and White Cover_$10.00
A A N Serving the Service for Over 27 year»

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