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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 09, 1944, Image 20

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1944-12-09/ed-1/seq-20/

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Keith’s Offers Exciting Mystery;
Romance Blooms at Palace
By JAY CARMODY.
“THE WOMAN IN THE .WINDOW,” an
RKO picture starring Edward G. Robin
son and Joan Bennett, and leaturing
Raymond Massey, produced and written
by Nunnally Johnson, directed by Frit*
Lang. At Keith’s.
THE CAST
Proi. Richard Wanley.Edward G. Robinson
The Strange Woman_ , Joan Bennett
District Attorney_.Raymond Massey
The Blackmailer_ Dan Duryea
Dr. Barkstane _ Edmond Breon
Inspector Jackson_Thomas E Jackson
Maaard __ _ Arthur Loft
Mrs. Wanley_Dorothy Peterson
Among the handful of screen
writers who have convinced their
employers they should be allowed to
produce and/or direct their own
scripts, one of the most able is
Nunnally Johnson. Mrv Johnson is
a fellow of imagination and one
who knows how to keep his values
human. Both aspects of this talent
are pleasantly evident in "The
Woman in the Window” which
opened today at Keith's. Both are
profound factors in making it one
of the most urbane, baffling and
humorous mysteries of the year,
one of the few things of its type
that creates a gnawing, frustrated
sense on the audience’s part that it
can beat the writer to a solution
of the crime. Helping Mi. Johnson
to create this effect is a suave cast
composed of such people as Edward
G. Robinson, Joan Bennett, Ray
mond Massey and Dan Duryea.
If it merely makes the customer
angry with himself for failing to
solve the crime, or with Mr. Johnson
for having devised so trick an end
ing for his murderous fable, “The
Woman in the Window” can be
guaranteed to leave no one unmoved.
a)c * $
As in the recent “Laura.” the per
sons involved in “The Woman in
the Window” are not the kind one
usually associates with emotions
that go so berserk that murder
can be their only relief. Its princi
pal settings are an exclusive men’s
club and a luxurious love nest in
which an international financier
nestles with his current darling.
The humans chiefly involved in the
action which takes place within
these two frames are a gentle pro
fessor of psychology, an easy-going
surgeon, an intellectual district at
torney, and the girl whose somewhat
ethereal loveliness has inspired an
artist to paint her and hang the
canvas in a prominent New York
gallery window.
Murder within the group, with its
follow-up of blackmail, etc., is hard
ly what one would associate with
such normally restrained people.
Mr. Johnson’s imagination did go
that far, however, but an honorable
conditon is imposed upon the re
viewer not to discuss where it all
ends. RKO hopes those who see the
picture also will keep a praiseworthy
silence on the same score.
* * * *
It is permissible to say, however,
that Mr. Robinson is the psychology
professor who became enamored,
innocently in the wav of psychology
professors, with Miss Bennetts
portrait. Thereafter, first thing
audiences know, she materializes
and the two of them in their loneli
ness wander into the nearest bar
where they have several stimulating
drinks. She is a nice girl, his
professor's mind tells him, and after
the drinks, he does not quibble a
bit at visiting her apartment to
see some other sketches of herself
done by the man who painted the
portrait in the window.
The innocence quickly vanishes
from the adventure when the inter
national banker, who is maintaining
the girl in such luxurious security,
shows up, explodes in volcanic
jealousy, and is stabbed to death
by the professor. Even with self
defense as an obvious motive for ihe
killing, the professor and the girl
conclude that it is better to con
ceal the body than to face the re
pugnant publicity which clearly will
follow.
Mr. Johnson's mind turns baf
flingly adroit at this point in his
story into which he introduces all
the elements of a manhunt con
ducted on a much higher plane
than is usual for such things. There
are the usual strands of hair, sleeve
ravelings. tire tracks, and other
shreds of evidence but the story
does not have the unusual aspects
that the murderer dines each night
with his good friend, the district
attorney, and the appearance of a
blackmailer upon whom the crime
could be pinned if chance should
once smile upon the professor and
the girl.
Some facile performing contrib
utes importantly to the excited pitch
of “The Woman in the Window”
once its premise is set. Robinson is >
Invariably convincing as the har- i
assed professor. Miss Bennett j
equally so as the girl. It is the
portrait of a smooth, intelligent, in
exorable district attorney that Mas
sey develops. Edward Breon is a
neatly counterpointed comedy char
acter as the doctor, and Thomas E.
Jackson is excellent as a laconic in
spector of police.
Interesting people they are, in
volved in a lot of excitement that
we should hat£ to spoil for any one
by adding another word at' this
point.
District Man Elected
H. P. Gould, 3909 Thirteenth
street N.W., was elected a vice pres
ident of the American Pomologieal
Society at the organization’s 16th
annual meeting this week at Roa
noke, Va.
1901 14th N.W.
Nationally Known Colored Stars
Margaret Watkins
"C. B. S. Singing Star”
Taliaferro and Vance
“Ballroom Smoothie!”
Martha Please
Novelty Aet.
Coleridge Davis Band
And Other Star*.
3 Shows Nightly. 0:30. 11:30. 1:30
Sunday—8, 10 and 18:30
DANCING.
Tuesday and Friday eve
I/"'* to 0:30, with 8 hours ot
<*11 D»nees) . . . only ... SI.
Private lessons at your convenience.
625 F ST. N.W. District 1673
'AND NOW TOMORROW," a Para
mount picture with Alan Ladd and Loretta
Young, produced by Fred Kohlmar, di
rected by Irving Pichel. screen play by
Frank Partos and Raymond Cnandler,
from the novel by Rachel Field. At the
Palace.
THE CA8T.
Emily Blair -- Loretta Young
Dr. Merek Vance._ Alan Ladd
Janice Blair-Busan Hayward
Jeff Stoddard-Barry Sullivan
Aunt Em-Beulah Bondi
Dr. Weeks _Cecil Kellaway
Angeletta Gallo_ Helen Mack
Peter Gallo -Anthony Caruso
Uncle Wallace-Grant Mitchell
Romance, wearing rather a rou
tine expression for all the agile
effort of Paramount to give it a
slick mask, came into the Palace
today under the heading, “And Now
Tomorrow.'” The title derives from
the novel of the same name by
Rachel Field and the producing
studio deemed her story worthy of
the presence in the principal roles
of Loretta Young and Alan Ladd,
a team previously engaged in
romantic dalliance in other locales.
Of its kind, it is competently
handled, which only slightly modi
fies the fact that its kind is com
monplace, the Cinderella story told
in reverse.
The principal distinction to be
found in “And Now Tomorrow” is
that is presents Ladd in a sort of
society wardrobe. Underneath those
well-tailored and expensive fabrics,
however, he is still pretty much
the embittered young man, dark
with the sense that the world is
unjust, and motivated by a feeling
that he ought to sock it on its indif
ferent nose. His violence is more
suppressed than usual, as becomes
the violence of a brilliant young
doctor who grew up on the wrong
side of the tracks. His public, how
ever, will feel not at all let down
by his sudden appearance in the
society set-up dominated by Miss
Young as an heiress whose stone
deafness he undertakes to heal.

The screen play which Frank
Partos and Raymond Chandler fash
ioned for Irving Pichel's direction
has been tricked up with the slickest
cast available at Paramount. It
offers Susan Heyward in the char
acter of the spoiled co-heiress who
tigerishlv snatches the ill sister’s
beau, Cecil Kellaway as the amiable
family physician. Barry Sullivan as
the lovelorn rich lad torn between
the two beautiful Blair girls. The
others fit as snugly into their lesser
roles.
There is slightly more of sub
stance to “And Now Tomorrow” than
there is to many similar items from I
Hollywood, but the effort to point j
out this fact gives the screen drama
a pretentious quality that is fa-!
milairly irksome. H
Miss Young's role, we would say,
is the most striking among the manv
she has been seen in lately. She is
Emily, of the Blair girls, the beauti
ful older one who is stricken with
meningitis at her engagement party
and emerges from that experience
totally and hopelessly deaf. It is
quite a chore, we would guess, for an
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing
Stage.
National—“Dark Hammock”: 2:30
and 8:30 p.m.
Screen.
Capitol—“Kansas City Kitty”:
10:45 a.m., 1:15, 3:50, 6:20, 8:55 and
11:25 p.m. Stage shows: 12:30, 3:06,
5:35, 8:10 and 10:40 p.m.
Columbia — “Something for the
Boys”: 11:45 a,.m.. 1:45, 3.40, 6:40,
7:35 and 9:35 pm.
Earle—“The Very Thought of
You”: 11 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50
pm. and 12:40 am. Stage shows:
1:05, 3:55, 6:35, 9:15 p.m. and 12:06
a.m.
Keith’s—“The Woman in the
Window”: 11:35 a.m., 1:35, 3:35,
5:35. 7:35 and 9:35 p.m.
Little—“The Gold Rush”: 11:05
am., 12:55, 2:40, 4:25, 6:10, 8 and
9:45 p.m.
Metropoiita n—"Frenchman’s
Creek”: 11 am., 1:05, 3:15, 5:20, 7:30
and 9:35 pm.
Palace—"And Now Tomorrow”: 11
a.m., 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40 and 9:50
p.m.
Pix—“Swing in the Saddle”: 3:15,
5:25, 7:40 and 10 pm.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts, con
tinuous from 10 a.m.
actress to go through that much film
footage pretending that she cannot
hear a word, but Miss Young does
it both convincingly and alluringly.
She brings off less well the impres
sion that she is a fairly brave girl,
whose total unawareness of poverty
and misery in the world is one of
society’s savage denials to poor little
rich girls.
* * * *
The correction of Miss Young's
defective hearing and her crassly
selfish—seemingly selfish—and aloof
attitude toward the poor who sur
round her is left in the story to the
young doctor played by Ladd. To
that duty he brings two reasonably
dramatic qualities, a genius for cura
tive medical research, and a con
trasting vindictiveness toward the
social set represented by his pretty
patient.
The pace of the duels they fight,
the one they fight jointly against
her illness and the one they fight
against each other from their dif
ferent corners in the economic set
up, is not exactly kaleidoscopic.
There is an occasionally dramatic
episode in each, however, the best
of which would seem to be a tene
ment operation sequence in which
the proud butterfly Blair abandons
her hauteur and helps the young
surgeon. That is quite credible as
are their fencing sessions into some
of, which a comedy note is injected
by letting the doctor slap the heiress
around verbally by pouring into her
deaf ears his real opinion of her.
Far less believable, to both you
and your family doctor, will be the
climactic scene in which the girl
volunteers to be guinea pig for the
young man's tissue - restorative
serum after it has worked in the
case of a single white rabbit. A
faith like that can have only one
reward and this one does.
It always has.
AMUSEMENTS.
AMUSEMENTS.
BUY A
BOND
HERE
TODAY
FOR
THE
VIC
TORY
BOWL
r i
i_r-i
The Horrors, But by Proxy
By HAROLD HEFFERNAN.
HOLLYWOOD.
David Wark Griffith invented the
close-up, along with numerous other
camera innovations still in use, but
D. W. never conceived a close-up
anywhere near so big as that being
projected in “The Lost Week End.”
This giant close-up is of Ray Mil
land’s right eyeball and when it is
projected in full Screen Director
Billy Wilder believes it will put
many spectators on the wagon and
perhaps provoke a few cases of the
D.T.’s.
The effect Wilder intends to
achieve is that of the audience tak
ing in the scene through the hang
overish eye of the so-called hero of
the story, as played by Milland.
The camera was placed Just 6 inches
away from the Milland iris. The
lens was so close that every time
Milland took a breath the eye went
out of focus,5* blurring the photo
graphic image.
This full screen reproduction of a
drunk’s bloodshot eye probably
won’t prove so inspiring as some
close-ups you’ve seen of Hedy La
marr emoting in the arms of Charles
Boyer, but at least it will be the
largest ever to be shown on a screen.
The usual close-up of a star’s face,
such as is found in practically every
movie, is made at a distance of ap
proximately 6 feet. Fans are accus
tomed to the result—a magnified
head of the hero or heroine, or both,
filling the whole screen.
AMUSEMENTS. .
IspeciauTI
■a SEIZED FILMS SHOW H
3 HITLER WOUNDED fc
ARMY-NAVY FOOTBALL*
WMAL Hourly Nmweatt
First Washington Shosrlng
“WHEN ASIA SPEAKS"
Midnight Show Ever? Saturday
Hollywood In the past has experi
mented with unusual close-ups and
has achieved some remarkable ef
fects. They’ve been particularly
graphic in horror pictures and, of
course, there was that one huge
close-up of the eyes of Clark Gable
and Vivien Leigh that helped along
the ecstatic moments of “Gone With
the Wind.” This was probably one
of the most expressive shots ever
captured by a movie camera.
* * * *
Another outstanding close-up was
registered in “This Gun for Hire."
For the opening shot of the picture,
the camera was 1 foot away from
_AMUSEMENTS.
DANCE CONCERT '
EVELYN DAVIS—ALAN WAINE
• and
THE DANCE PLAYHOUSE GROUP
Sat. eve,. Dec. ». at 8:30. Ticket*. *1.»0
bun. aft.. Dec. 10. at t. dncl.Taxi
THE DANCE PLAYHOUSE
_ tin Church St. X.W.
For reservations ran MI 8548 after 0 PM
Alan Ladd’s head. This shoved the
psychopathic killer awakening to the
ringing of an alarm clock. An ex
traordinary one was filmed in “Five
Graves to Cairo,” when the lens
moved to within 10 inches of Fran
chot Tone’s bare chest to focus on
the British Tommy’s identification
“dog tag” so that the name stamped
in the metal was clearly visible.
* * * +
Note of envy for the ladies: Judy
Garland received in her mail re
cently a plain box, without post
mark, and opened it to find four
large bottle of rare French perfume,
. AMUSEMENTS.
t MIDNIGHT Complete staeeTT
tcreen SHOW TONIGHT at n\\ I
/ -gaAX at the
■ ___ Eleanor *
I MORGAN'PARKER
I CLARK * EMERSON
I m Warner Bros.
I "THE VERY ,
| THOUGHT OF YOU
World Premiere
i[|7 ■—Warner Bros. Featurette a
I BEACHHEAD TO BERLIN*
i PriMKi m TECHNICOLOR | I
I Films made by U. S. Coast Guard j !
I And On Stage j|
^lean CARROLL * Roxyettes • others^
j^T* VERT TH0U6KT If HP” tea at HWrassadaT j
BUY A BOND - Get Your Name in the
VICTORY BOWL - You May Receive a
$1500 WAR BOND at Earle-or $500
WAR BOND at the Metropolitan
--/SJopEjflHElAXjtthe^
SOPtN 1030 a. m.
Fontaine
) de Cordova
ENCHMAN’S
EEK" Technicolor
Last Feature 9 40 c m
\miokits SHOwtount itts • in i f51. 4,,1?A-?0f'A'‘/£%\ w mhwr
Tfcmuds if ebb Umt kj tkc ^tmmy.,,n Isl*-' ‘Jffi; ^ '“V. !S'
<i rcckka Oib*...«l, to n fl|B*S»U,lW.*~£2i2S
|wi|es «l lb FR0tf
ty g'-J f&JKkr' OHmUttnuM HITS
T .-’if >« *J <^r^M FRAZEE • THE USER HOTSHOTS .
i >*,x^VS GUtNN(«)WILLIAMS • SLIM SUMMERVILLE i5*
Vl>^^45ifs; KMG COLE TRIO * JIMMY WAKELY AND fcjfl
r IMCIM6 * fl "*
A daring, factual expose o flaming ■» f flfj fntjt
youth on the Nation's frghways.
DOORS OPEN
10*45 A. M.
Repueet
PLEASE DON’T TELL ANY
BODY THE SECRET OF THfc
AMAZING CLIMAXt
It's gta4, to* sxcHing, Im sit
ixpwb4 ft bt spallt4 for anyba4y
wbt hasn't sttn fht pltfsrt. Afftr
yatr twn grtaf fbrtN ytt’H kntw
trbtf wt Mtat, Nt adniffttat dttr
lag sals tit a tf ■ytftry.
. IWTEWIATIONAt WTUKS. mC .Mwnti
EDWARD G. ROBINSON
JOAN BENNETT -
Woman *
•Ill)
•RAYMOND MASSEY
mi EDMOND BREON • DAN DURYEA
Directed by FRITZ lANG
A NONNALLY JOHNSON Production
Reiened by RKO Rndio Pictures, Inc
absolutely unobtainable in this
country.
They had been sent from Paris
by a GI she had never heard of.
(Released by North American Newspaper
Alliance.)
AMUSEMENTS
Washington Grand Opera
CONSTITUTION HALL
STARS OF METROPOLITAN, OTHERS I
RIGOLETTO
DECEMBER 13. 8:30
ALEXANDER SVED
World's Greatest Rigoletto
JOSEPHINE ANTOINE
Greatest Coloratura, Met. Opera
BOURBON
ALTIERI, WEBSTER. DENNIS,
ENGELMAN, SORRENTINO
CHANGE OF SCENERY EACH ACT
ALL NEW YORK COMPANY
Tickets: SI.20, SI.80, S3.88. S3.90
The Hecht Co., 4th Floor, District 5126.
Willard Hotel, NAtional 5575.
1 CONT. MAT. |2 to 5
CyC$. 6:30 RES.SEAT*
AMUSEMENTS.
L«t 2 Tim.*
Mirn 0AVM 4 f AM H. AMMAN
DARK HAMMOCK*
MARY ORR • RIOMALO MNHAAL
■* ELISSA LAND!
RIARY WICK IS . CHAR LI. McCLMAMN)
ONE WEEK ONLY BEG. MONDAY
^AIAX GORDONfi**s**<» Mm_
TRIUMPHANT BROADWAY SUCCESS
QutkQ&tdon
AtHtR-new C^rfrllUA*i!l'
CQMEoy
I
_ RUTH GORDON
mtaujedl)y STORM SXAUFMAM
.*•». 1 20 I.M. 2.40: Or«k. *3 <t»i taui.)
MxU. Wad. A Oat.. 60c. 1.20, l.M. 2.4*
mueM
the COLD KUSB
TODAY'S NEIGHBORHOOD MOVIES
Buy War Bonds and Stamps at Any Local Theater.
rsnm viva iith * N c.
InnULlnA Matinee I P.M.
‘KISS THE BOYS GOOD BYE.” MARY
MARTIN. ROD CAMERON in ‘BOSS
OP BOOMTOWN.”___
rvnrr v 2105 pa. at«. n.w re. 01 si.
MtllLL Matinee 1 P.M. Cent.
Today Only. “THE HITLER GANG.’ with
ROBERT WATSON. ROMAN BOHNEN.
At 1:20. 3:25. 5:25. 7:30. 9:35.
CONGRESS 2931 8E
ROY ROGERS in “SAN FERNANDO VAL
LEY ” At 1:05. 2:50. 4:30. 6.15. 8:00,
9:45. Also Three Stooge Comedy._
DUMBAHTON ,319MW,i* A"
Triple Attraction A Big Treat LANA
TURNER. ROBERT YOUNG in
' ‘ SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS ” Also ONE
FRIGHTNED NIGHT.” MARY CAR
LISLE in ‘VALLEY OF VANISHING
MEN”. And OUR GANG COMEDY._
FAIRLAWN Good Hope Rd. S.E.
MARY LEE RUTH TERRY. CHERYL
WALKER in "THREE LITTLE SISTERS."
At 1:20. 3:03. 4:40. 0:25, 8:05, 9:50.
Also Little Luiu Cartoon._
rnrrunri t cmnofii. »d.
UnUUDUil Double Feature.
A. CARNEY, W. BROWN m "7 DAYS
ASHORE." and LEO GORCEY and EAST
SIDE KIDS in “FOLLOW THE LEAD
ER." Cont. 1: Last Complete 8how 8:30, j
HIGHLAND 8533 'SSTwfT 8 E
BASIL RATHBONE as SHERLOCK HOLMES I
in "THE PEARL OF DEATH ’ At 1:50,
3:50. 5:50, 7:60. 9:50.
I |PH 3227 M St. N.W. WHITE ONLY.
Today Only. New Show 8unday. Double
Feature Program FRONTIER TOWN ’
JOHN MacBROWN Also "WEEK END
PASS.’’ Comedy. Cartoon, Chapter. A
Truely Great Show. _ _____
LITTLE ~fl08Be?hFS£- Zw
CHARLIE CHAPLIN in ’’THE GOLD
RUSH__
PIY 13tb & H Sti N #
■ Centlnuou. 2-11.
"SWING IN THE SADDLE" and “HIGH
WAY HELL
LOWS BEBKHEIMEB'S THEATERS
THE VILLAGE T4 W
Phone Mich. 9227
“Barbarv Coast Gent.”
WALLACE BERRY. BINNIE BARNE8.
_Mat, at 1 P.M._
NEWTON ‘'ths?"dNSErw,on
Double Feature.
“TIGER SHARK.”
EDWARD G. ROBINSON. RICHARD
ARLEN.
“San Fernando Valley.”
ROY ROGERS. DALE EVANS.
_Mat, at l P.M._
JESSE THEATER iffiUte.
Phone DU. 9861.
Double Feature.
“MY BUDDY,”
DON BARRY. RUTH TERRY
“CHEROKEE STRIP,” j
DICK FOR AN
_Mat, at 1 P.M_!
CVf VElf tst St- * K. 1. Ave. N.W.
» X Ac Y Jill Phone NOrth 9689.
Double Feature.
“A Night of Adventure,”,
TOM CONWAY. JEAN BROOKS i
“Brand of the Devil,”
DAVE OBRIEN. JIM NEWILL.
_Mat, at 1 P.M._:
THE yramm 3707 Mt. Vernon i
NEW YMI1IUII Ave.. Alex., Va
One Block from Presidential Gardens.
Phone Alex. 2124.
Double Feature
‘THE JUNGLE WOMAN,’
EVELYN ANKERS J. CARROL
NA1SH.
“Allergic to Love,”
MARTHA ODRISCQLL, NOAH
BERRY. JR
_ Mat, at 1 P.M._
DAT M Mt. Vernon Ave.
rJilcPl Alex.. Va. Alex 0767
“Twilight on the Prairie,”
EDDIE QUILLAN. VIVIAN AUSTIN.
Mat, at l P.M.
ACADEMY 535 ulh96si6.8E
Double Feature.
“THE IMPOSTER,”
JEAN GABIN. ELLEN DREW.
“STAGECOACH,”
JOHN WAYNE. CLAIRE TREVOR.
Mat, at 1 p.M.
STANTON 51Lc5§Lne
Double Feature.
“GHOST CATCHERS,”
OLSEN and JOHNSON.
“MEN OF THE SEA,”
WILFRED LAWSON, MARY •
JERROLD
_Mat. at 1 P.M._
-SIDNEY LUST THEATERS
BETHESDA 'BetbisdanSMdATe' 1
WI. 2838 or WI. 9638. Free Parkin,.
Continuous 1-11.—Double Feature.
Last Complete Double Show 9:30.
GENE AUTRY. SMILEY BURNETTE in
BIG SHOW 1 Also LYNN ROBERTS
in PORT OF 40 THIEVES ”
Sun., Mon., Tues.—Double Feature.
Norma Shearer,
Robert Taylor in
“ESCAPE.”
L. Armstrong and
P. Whiteman’s Bands in
“ATLANTIC CITY.”
CAMEO 34th S
Continuous 1-11.—Double Feature.
Last Complete Double Show 9:30.
RED BARRY in "BLACK HILLS EX
PRESS." MARG. O'BRIEN in "CAN
TERVILLE GHOST."
Sun., Mon., Tues..—Double Feature.
JEAN GABIN in
“IMPOSTER.”
DEANNA DURBIN in
“Christmas Holiday.”
nVATTCVTI I V BaltimoreTBWd.
RIAI laVlliliL Hyattsville. Md.
Union 1230 or Hyatts. 0552. Park Free.
Continuous 1-11—-Double Feature.
Last Complete Double Show 9:30.
FIBBER McGEE and MOLLY in
"HEAVENLY DAYS." JERRY COLON
NA. ARMSTRONG and WHITEMAN'S
BANDS in "ATLANTIC CITY '
Sun.. Mon.. Tues..—Technicolor Hit.
“AMERICAN ROMANCE,”
with BRIAN DONLEVY.
Mil A Bockviile, Md. Bock. 101.
Filial) Free Parkin,.
Continuous 2-11.—Double Feature.
BILL ELLIOTT. GABBY HAYES in
"OVERLAND MAIL ROBBERY." PAUL
LUKAS in "ADDRESS UNKNOWN."
Sun.. Mon.—PAULETTE GODDARD In
“I LOVE A SOLDIER.”
MARLBORO 0pp*rk£;,r‘b??*- Md
Continuous 2-11.—Double Feature.
SMILY BURNETTE. LARAMIE TRAIL.
ANlgMILLER. LOUIS ARMSTRONG'S
BAND in "JAM SESSION.”
Sun . Mon.—PAULETTE GODDARD in
“I LOVE A SOLDIER.”
HIPPODROME
Continuous 2-11.—Double Feature.
Walter Pidgeon, Robert
Taylor in
“FLIGHT COMMAND.”
MARX BROS, in
“BIG STORE.”
Today, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday.
ALEXANDRIA. VA.
arm Kins St.—Alex. 344ft.
HJbUI Parkin* Snare Air-Conditioned
MONTY WOOLLEY. JUNE HAVER, DICK
HAYMES IN "IRISH EYES ARE SMIL
ING ”
RICHMOND Mat.9Daily AVr-CnndiUoned
ST^« gr1^iM)^ert henrt m
i
' BUY WAR BONDS AT WARNER BROS/ THEATERS1 _
All Time Schedules Given in Warner
Bros.’ Ads Indicate Time Feature la
Presented.
_Theaters Having Matinees.
AMBASSADOR vw'coks?.?:
Mat t P.M.
DENNIS MORGAN. ELEANOR PARK
ER. DANE CLARK tn THE VERY
THOUGHT OP YOU.” At 1:00. 3:10.
5:20. 7:30. 9:45.*
avhiTn HT***”irson;
HrULLU FR. ,5300. Mat. 1 P.M.
Today only. ANDREWS SISTERS in
'MOONLIGHT AND CATCUS" At
2:30, 5:35. 8:45 ROBERT WATSON
in "HITLER GANG ". At 1.00, 4:05.
7:15, 10:2 5._
&VAI AW 5013 Conn. Are. N W
HTiUiUn WO. 2000. Mat. 1 P.M.
Today only. JIMMY LYDON In "HEN
RY ALDRICH LITTLE SECRET." At
1:25. 3:30. 5:30. 7:35. 9:40.
AVE. GRAND ll
Mat 1PM
Today only. INA RAY HUTTON In
"EVER SINCE VENUS' At 145
5:00. 8:10. VAN HEFLIN In BACK
DOOR TO HEAVEN." At 3:00, 6:10.
9:25. Mystery River Boat, (cartoon >
GET YOUR NAME IN OIK VICTORY
BOWL FOR S1.OOOJN_BO.ND PRIZES.
nrvrRT v isth a e n.e.
OZ.VC.nliX Ll 3300 Mat. IP M.
Last Day JON HALL. MARIA MON
TEZ in "GYPSY WILDCAT " At 1:15.
3:25. 5:35, 7:45. 9:40._
rat vrnT mm wl. at*, n.w.
bAlaVX.fl I WO. 2343. Mat. 1 P M.
Last Day JON HALL. MARIA MON
TEZ in GYPSY WILDCAT ” At 1 45
3:50. 5:56, 7:55. 9:45 Mystery of
River Boat, (mat, only). Chapter 1.
rrNTRAI 423 9th St.. NW
bX.fi IflillaME. 2841. Opena 10:13
Today through Tuesday. JOYCE
REYNOLDS. ROBERT HUTTON tn
"JANIE” At 11:00. 2:25. 5:50. 9:15
WM BENDIX. SUSAN HAYWARD tn
"HAIRY APE." At 12:55. 4:20, 7:45
rni nuv 4935 r,. *?«. n.w.
bUlaUfll GE. 6300. Mat. 1 P M.
Today only. EDGAR BERGEN.
CHARLIE MCCARTHY In "SONG OF
THE OPEN ROAD.” At 1:30. 3:30.
5:40. 7:40. 9:45.__
DflMF 1230 C St. N.E.
IIUIUX. TR. 8188. Mat. 1 P.M.
Today only, PAT O'BRIEN in "SEC
RET COMMAND." At 1:00. 3:45.
6:40, 9:30. TEX RITTER in "DEAD
OR ALIVE "_At 2:3d. 3 4(1, 8 40
VrUNrnV Kennedy Nr. 4th N.W.
nx.nnx.ui ra eooo Mat i p.m.
Today only DONALD O CONNOR !n
"MERRY MONOHANS.” At 1:30.
3:30. 5:35. 7:35. 9:40. Cartoon.
PFNN 5»e- »t 7th 8.E.
rz.nn fr 5200. Mat. 1 p.m.
Last Day. JON HALL. MARIA MON
TEZ in "GYPSY WILDCAT " At 1:45.
3:45. 5:45. 7:45. 9:45 GET YOl’R
NAME IN OCR VICTORY BOWL FOR
SI.000 IN ROND PRIZES.
C A VflV _3030 14th St. N.W.
anvui CO. 4908. Mat. 1 P.M.
Today only. ABBOTT and COSTELLO
m "IN SOCIETY.” At 1:00. 2:30.
4:15, 0:05. 7:50. 9:45.
crrn Ga. Aye- Sliver So ring?
aBbU SH. 2310. Mat. 11 A.M.
Today only. BOB CROSBY in "THE
SINGING SHERIFF." At 11. 1:50.
4:40. 7:30. 10. MARJORIE WEAVER
in "SHADOWS OF SUSPICION." At
12:40, 3:30, 6:20. 8:55, Cartoon
SHFRinAN £*■ Are. A Sheridan!
dOLniUHn RA. 2100 Mat. I P.M.
Today only. JIMMY LYDON in "HEN
RY ALDRICH LITTLE SECRET " At
1_325. 3:05. 4:45. 6:20. 8:00, 9:40
CII VrD Ga. Are. * Colasville Pika
V lift SH. 3300 Mat. 1 P.M.
Today only JON HALL. MARIA MON
TEZ in GYPSY WILDCAT" At
1:00. 2:45. 4:30, 6:15. 8:00. 9:43
TAROMA 4th * Butternut Sts
InAUPlA GE. 4312. Mat. 1 P.M
Today only. FRANCES LANGFORD in
"DIXIE JAMBOREE " At 1:30. 4:20.
7:05 9:40 "RIDE. TENDERFOOT.
RIDE ' At 2:40. 5:30, 8:20 "RAID
ERS GHOST CITY." (mat, only*.
TIVOII !ia A p»rk Rd. nTw.
IlVUlai CO. 1800. Mat. 1 P.M.
Last day, JON HALL. MARLA MON
TEZ in "GYPSY WILDCAT." At 1:00.
2:«o. 4:30. 6:10. 7:55, 9:40.
ITPTnWN Conn. Ava. A Newark!
*»|r*VVVII WO. 5400. Mat. 1 P.M
Today through Monday. PAULETTE
GODDARD to "I LOVE A SOLDIER "
At 1:15. 3:20. 5:25. 7:30. 9:40. __
VflRK Ga Are. * Ouebee Pl~N W.
lUftA RA. 4 100. Wat. 1 P.M.
Today only. ROY ROGERS tn "SONG
9P.TEXAS” At 1:50, 3:45. 5:45.
(i45.
K B THEATERS
ARLINGTON FALLS CHURCH. VA.
Information Phone OXford 1130—F. C. 1555
SPrV 48th A Mass. Ave. N.W.
***;*■« . Woodley 4600.
Take the Crosstown or N-2 Bna
Direct to Door.
Doors Open at 3 2:30.
HS?YLAMARR. PAUL HEN REID In
“THE CONSPIRATORS.”
At 1:00. 3:20. 5:30. 7:35. 9:45
Starting Tomorrow: MARRIAGE IS
A PRIVATE AFFAIR."
ATI AC 1331 H St. N.E. AT? 9300
AlIiMd Double Feature.
Continuous J to il PM
“Twilight on the Trail,”
WILLIAM BOYD. ANDY RLyDE.
Plus:
“Sons of the Desert,”
with LAUREL'and HARDY
Cartoon Show and New Serial.— Prea
Gifts. Starting Tomorrow: "AR
SENIC AND OLD LACE." Plus:
"SUMMER STORM"
PRINCESS
Continuous 11 A M. to 11 P.M.
Double Feature.
WILD BILL ELLIOTT In
‘CHEYENNE WILDCAT.’
Plus:
FAYE EMERSON. JEROME COWAN in
‘Find The Blackmailer.”
SENATOR rIlVe”
„„„„„ Two Big Hits!
S?TB,E.RZ,ZiJBOR- VIVIEN LEIGH in
“WATERLOO BRIDGE.”
At 1:15. 5:00, 8:50.
_ Plus:
“THE HITLER GANG,”
with ROBERT WATSON
At 3:05. 7:00.
Also serial, "THE PHANTOM "
Starting Tomorrow: "AN AMERICAN
_ROMANCE.”
STATE Shows l-ll.
THE MERRY MONOGHANS.-' DON’.
ALD O CONNOR, PEGGY RYAN
LEE A Tr**t L#J lhe Family
,Pd
ARLINGTON £WoV*SSi
■BARBARY COAST GENt“ waL
LACE B EERY. BINNIE BARNES
WILSON ii39 Wilson Bird. ’
TTlljOUn Phone OX. 1480.
“WILSON,” ALEXAN
DER KNOX. GERAL
DINE FITZGERALD.
Mat : Chll. 40c: Adult* T6e Ere:
$l l°- r*«- « i.
ASHTON 8166 Wilson Bird.
"LOUISIANA HAYRIDE." JUDY CA
NOVA, ROSS HUNTER.
BUCKINGHAM
“I LOVE A SOLDIER.” PAULETTE
1 GODDARD. SONNY TUFTS
HISER-BETHESDA EWE **&
Claudette Colbert, Jennifer
Jones, Shirley Temple,
Monty Woolley, Lionel
Barrymore and Robert
Walker in
‘SINCE YOU WENT AWAY.**
Matinee Today, 1 P.M.;
Feature Showing at
2:20, 5:35 and 8:45
Regular Admission Price.

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