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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 02, 1946, Image 39

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Society, Like the Theater,
Has Flavor of Unreality
By Jay Carmody
Mjss Betty Hynes of Mrs. Patterson's paper retired from the drama
again the other day. In writing new lyrics to her swan song—which is!
always sad because Betty is such a gay critical colleague—she said a
piquant thing. She was giving up the fantasy of the theater, she sighed
to go back to the realities of Society. That is the Society spelled with
capital S, which has nothing to do with plain society sometimes
called society-at-large. t-— -—__
The latter is the one in which we
thought one encountered the reali
ties, but if Miss Hynes says other
wise. the only gallant thing to do is
assume that she is right and we are
wrong.
It just goes to show how errant a
man's thinking can be for it was
our impression that the most seri
ous remissness of the theater today
was its interest in Society instead
of society. This is not a private
opinion, but one held widely. Al
most as widely as the world is wide,
at least, among persons or certain
habits of mind. These people, who
may 1*? silly even if we don't think
so, do not go to the theater because
it has turned its back on everything
but the very Society Betty is talk
ing about. The one to which she
goes, perhaps hoping like James
Joyce, "to encounter for the mil
lionth time the reality of experi
ence and (maybe) forge in the
eternal smithy of my soul the un
created conscience of the race.”
* * * *
We have nothing against Society
with the capital “S,” but we don’t
thing it is any better than the
theater in giving one a chance to
snuggle with reality.
Once this winter, or last winter
as it seems to be now, we went to a
party that really should have fairly
reeked with realities. It could have
symbolized, in a small way, most of
the issues of the time.
It was an official party. The so
ciety columnists were there, and a j
couple of the long-haired column- j
ists who prowl the punch bowl cir- :
cuit locally looking for significant'
things to write about. It was a good
opportunity for a mere drama col
umnist, a fellow from the never- j
never-land of the theater, to see
what the machinery of society was
grinding out to make this a better
world to live in.
Actually, it was quite disappoint- i
!ng. Instead of giving a man a
feeling that something even a little
bit useful to the species was being j
accomplished, it left him with a dis-1
mayed ser*e that he was an actor in |
a Noel Coward or a Frederick Lons- '
dale drawing room comedy.
The guests of honor were the
members of a mission from a little
country which had lately been an
enemy. The country was so little
that this one had hardly bothered
to declare war on ii, and most of
the Americans present really were
not sure we ever had. The mem
bers of the mission seemed to be
quite conscious of this ignorance or
indifference, but they were serious.
They were here to get American
good will—to be followed by a loan—
and they went around dutifully
speaking hopeful words in their
prim classroom English. The Amer
icans. and some witty English ones,
would listen politely and somewhat
uncomfortably. Then, as soon as1
conditions would permit, they would
excuse themselves and go away.
They all had the look of a man who
Is being panhandled on the street
AMUSEMENTS
fcONALD
Prisoner
/zenm I
GAYETY^wtw-,
CONT; jfDoeo attraction
”*l8.SI6RID FOX in
sjo !
IN PARIS
STREAMLINER AT 80 MPH
CRASHES ANOTHER
45 KILLED, 100 INJURED
WMAL—Hourly Newscast
THERE IS ALWAYS FUN
FROM THE THRILL RIDES
AND ALL THE OTHER
• FINE ATTRACTIONS AT
EVERY DAY FROM
ONE UNTIL MIDNIGHT
DANCING
9 TO 12 EXCEPT SUNDAY
Jack Corry
HIT BAND OF 12
WITH VOCALS BY
KAY LINTON
AKO KEITH’S:::,
OMN I8i<5—SUN, 12 I
] The Trip LL
**m5g**L /
M Dorothy McGURE'
George BRENT
Etbil BARRYMORE
' IUXT— ABBOTT B COSTELLO
"Tin Liltk Oi.m"
_ SAT. MORNING • MAY JS
— rr l buy your yickets now
»»«toon\ oh sale at box office
C \ALL SEATS JS. INC TAX
PERFORMANCE only
and who does not know' whether to
give the fellow' something or rec
ommend to him the proper Com
munity Chest agency. Everybody
was embarrassed and wished some
one would say something at which
they all could laugh.
That was where the Noel Cow-ard
leading lady came along and took
things over. It was quite a good act.
and in a play no doubt would have
received a good notice.
* * * *
‘'Does anybody here know any
thing about poor iname of coun
try)?” her opening speech W'ent.
When it turned out that none of
the Americans or English really did
know anything about poor iname of
country), she went on:
“I read up on it a little before I
came, but it was only in an old 1910
encyclopedia. Poor little (name of
country) certainly wasn't much in
1910. Hardly a page, and mostly in
large type, too. And virtually no
footnotes."
She had her audience laughing by
then.
"I m sure a lot of dramatic things
have happened to the place since,
but then it didn’t even have the
queen that every one was talking
about 15 years ago. Or, come to
think of it, it never did have that
particular queen. She was of an
other country. One about the same
size. And close by, as I remember.”
The act was going great by this
time, and so was the party. Its
gay mood was so infectious that
even the members of the mission
were laughing, although thev ob
viously were not sure just why.
At 7 o'clock they all clicked'their
heels and said their prim good-bys
and went away. The invitations
had read 5:30 to 7 o'clock. The
guests of honor thought that meant
they had to leave.
It all seemed quite unreal, even
to one so accustomed to the un
reality of the theater.
But it was society and Miss Hynes
says that is w'here reality is. A
drama critic, perhaps, no longer is
able to recognize it.
'Amber’ Halts,
May Resume
Without Peggy
By Harold Heffeman
- HOLLYWOOD.
Peggy Cummins, 20-year-old Irish
; actress, imported to play the star
role in “Forever Amber,” film version
of the novel by Kathleen Winsor,
was reported to be ill at her home
today following the climax of one of
the most costly producing debacles
| in Hollywood history.
1 Following the shelving of the pic
i ture, after 40 days of shooting, pre
sumably to find a new director to
replace John Stahl, it w:as disclosed
i by authoritative studio sources yes
terday that, when the script is re
j written and a new start made on
the picture, Miss Cummins will be1
replaced by another actress in the
; title role.
That 20th Century-Fox contem
plates an entirely new deal on the
project, was indicated by the fact
that all wardrobe material, includ
ing wigs for the principal piayers,
has been called in, to be replaced
by other sizes. Cornel Wilde. Vin
cent Price, Glen Langan and Regi
nald Gardiner are leading male
members of the old cast. It is hint
ed that all will be dropped.
A jinx pursued “Forever Amber”
; from the outset of filming. A tough j
shooting schedule and the frailness
of. Peggy Cummins, the 5-foot, 92
pound heroine, were obstacles that
eventually brought collapse to the
undertaking.
Several times Miss Cummins was
reported out because of illness. She
lost weight rapidly and after the
second week of shooting it had be
come a monumental job for the
editing and camera departments to
make her shots match. She lost
more than 12 pounds in the space of
three weeks and w'as placed on a
strict build-up diet by doctors.
It is estimated the studio will
take a loss of $250,000 or more on
the unfinished picture.
Reports were curernt in the film
capital today that shelving of “For
ever Amber” was due directly to
censorship repercussions over How- i
aid Hughes’ “The Outlaw.”
In some sources it was said.that
the Motion Picture Producers' As
sociation was cautiously attempting
to clean its house on the inside and
put the soft pedal on movies now in
production that might cause further
censorship stampedes. In this case
AMUSEMENTS AMUSEMENTS
^ NOW SHOWING..
^ DOORS OPEN TODAY 11:14 A M
FIRST SHOW 10:45 A.M.
LAST FEATURE TONIGHT UM ^
__ /lb
COME OUT FROM BEHIND THAT
BRUSH,BOYS...WE KNOW YA!
STARTS
TODAY
All FRANCE BLUSHED
AT HER DARING...
MEN TREMBLED
BEFORE HER
RAPIER!,
'^ALEXANDRE DUMAS
ilof'mg
JOHN LODER
LENORE HUBERT
ALSO ON SCREEN
"LEON ERROL COMEDY"
Doors Open \ ‘UNUSUAL OCCUPATIONS"'
10:30 a.m. \ * JASPER CARTOON"
Warner Bros. F NEAR 10th
METROPOLITAN
Powell Happy as 'Father’ ,
By Sheilan Graham
HOLLYWOOD.
Elizabeth Taylor, who is 14, is
playing a 16-year-old ingenue in
“Life With Father.” And she has
her first screen tor any other)
romance. Her beau is Jimmy Lydon
—he’s 24 and married. “Do you get
to kiss him?” I ask Elizabeth. "No,
but I sit on his lap,” says Lizzie.
William Powell, "Father,” is in his
dressing room. And I think he looks
very odd with his bright red hair.
“But my wife loves it,” he assures I
me. Well, that’s the main thing, j
Bill has been after “Life With
Father” since 1940, when he tried to
get Metro to buy the successful, and
still running, play. But the price
was too high and Howard Lindsay
and Russel Crouse wanted to be in
on the making of the movie when
they felt the time was right. Powell’s
agent sold Warners on buying it,
and then Bill had to sell Metro on
lending him to Warners.
The set is full of experts. In ad
dition to Lindsay and Crouse there
is Mrs. Clarence Day, widow of
“Father's'' son, and her 14-year-old i
daughter, Wendy. When I ask Di
rector Mike Curtiz how he manages
to make his picture with so many
experts around, he replies, “on the
first day I called them all together
and told them—’I'm temperamental,
but I know my job. Please trust
me.’ ”, So far—and I’m touching
wood for Mike—it has worked.
* * * *
Merle Oberon's evening gown is
staying up all by Itself—in “Bella
Donna.” I am standing on the top
step of her dressing room and look
ing down at Merle. She's a very
beautiful woman in the strapless
the industry as a whole could be
expected to absorb whatever losses
accrued on “Forever Amber.” I
North American Newspaper Alliance. •
[gown. *‘I play a London divorcee,”
t says Merle, who recently divorced
Londoner Sir Alexander Korda. She
has a hectic affair with Charles
Korvin. ‘‘We try to kill George
Brent,” says Korvin, Who looks East
ern and interesting in a colored silk
caftan. Brent plays Merle’s second
husband and he’s an archaeologist.
And most of the action takes place
in Egypt near and in the tombs of
the Pharaohs. The press agent with
us sums up the movie as "a story
of violent passions.” It’s from the
Robert Hichens famous novel.
Brian Aherne is a doctor and he
is going dotty in ‘‘What Nancy
Wanted.” He is married to a klep
tomaniac—none other than Laraine
Day. At the moment—in their sit
ting room in London—he is trying
hard to believe that his wife is not
a thief. It seems that Lady Wynd
ham's diamond necklace is missing.
After a bad moment of doubt, Brian1
apologizes to Laraine for having sus
pected her. And that naughty La
raine has the diamond necklace all
the time!
The movie of “What Nancy
Wanted” is told in a series of flash
backs. Brian narrates the story.
But at the end, Laraine tells the
audience not to believe a word of
Brian's tale because “he’s insane”!
Is that something new in endings,
or is it?
Ella Raines is “looping” on a re
cording stage at Universal. No, she
is not in an airplane. “Looping” is
the technical term for dubbing in
dialogue after the scenes have been
shot. It's for Ella’s picture, “The
Runaround.” She had some storm
scenes to do with Rod Cameron and
her voice was not heard above the!
thunder. So now she is sitting on a
stool, wearing black slacks, with a
bottle of pop in her hand, and;
screaming brief sentences that make
AMUSEMENTS_ AMUSEMENTS
I TWO FRENCH DIALOGUE C. >/i<?gbcs/j'
Ream sawn 1
r'-t.tftt III washIncto^remiere!
s:r^lCLlVE BROOK.
II RETURN TO YE 3 TER £ A Y
]
r OWERFUL
AND BOLD IN 11$ STORY!
UNFORGETTABLE
IN ITS DRAMA! M
DANA ANDREWS • ».krichard conte
Produced and Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE • From the Novel
by HARRY BROWN • Screen Play by ROBERT ROSSEN • 20th Century-Fox
V§ j J w iT#4 "uHli
The One end Only
PAT ROONEY
RICHARD ADAIR DANCERS
featuring
LILLIAN & MART • JEAN ARDEN
DOTTIE BONCORE •
in “A Clyde Beatty Fantasy” 1
BUNIN'S PUPPETS
ROLLY ROLLS **
nn'ff nnri 11 I,
Doors opon SH if
10:45
_DANCING. DANCING.
THIS OFFER MADE POSSIBLE IN ORDER TO AC
QUAINT YOU WITH OUR METHOD OF INSRUCTION
DANCING
M;; $11|
Lessons ■ ™ F
• Fox Trot • Waits • Jitterbug • Tango • Samba • Rumba
DON MARTINI—ORIGINATOR OF THE CHAIN DANCE
SCHOOL IDEA—has taught thousands of individuals through
out the U. S. to dance with EASE, POISE and GRACE
DON MARTINI
Naw Yark, Carnagia Hall; laltimara, 319 H, Charlai; Phila., 902 Chaitnut
REVOLUTIONIST—Or maybe
she is on the other side. At
any rate, Eva Gabor is im
portantly involved in the film
called “The Wife of Monte
Cristo,’’ at the Metropolitan.
no sense—but they will when tied up
with the thunder scenes in the pic
ture. Watching her and limping
all over the place is Cameron, who
seems to be in love with Ella off
stage as well as on. They lunch
together every day and go places In
the evenings four or five times a
: _
j__amusements
LISNER AUDITOR IUM
or
I The George Washington University
present!
EVELYN DAVIS
ALLEN WAINE
and
The Dance Playhouse Group
Thursday Evening, May 9, 1946, 8:40 P M
Ticket!: SLJ.40—S1.80— SI.SO (tax inel.j
On sale at:
! Limer Auditorium, Slit and H St!. N.W.
Dance Playhouse, 171" Church St N.W
_For Keiervatiom, call: National 5055
mim
NOW,,. Doors op»n 10:30
W1
week. And In Hollywood—or any
where, else—that's love, son.
Cameron’s limp is the result of
his too realistic fight with Brod
Crawford in the picture. “I’m hav- i
ing my toe X-rayed,” he tells me.!
But you should see poor Brod. His
once classical nose is a mess! “It’s!
broken,” he tells me, "and I have
to have two thin splints up each
nostril until it heals.” Now, who
Grants to be a movie actor?
North American Newspaper Alliance
Montgomery Plans
Broadway Shows
HOLLYWOOD:
Elliott Nugent, now directing
"Welcome Stranger” for Paramount, j
and Robert Montgomery plan to
leave Hollywood on September 14 to j
start rehearsals of "The Big Two,” a
new play by Ladislaus Bush-Fekete
and Mary Helen Fay, which they 1
will produce on Broadway. This is I
the first of two stage productions
they have scheduled for the coming
season. Nugent will direct “The Big
Two,” and both are arranging their
picture plans so they can launch
their play activity in New York.
Montgomery’s commitments at
M-G-M will prevent him from ap
pearing in one of the two leading
roles. He now' is preparing "The
Lady in the Lake,” in which he will
star as well as direct.
-J _.... . .!
AMUSEMENTS
AMUSEMENTS
S tatter Hotel—TONIGHT—8 3#
NATIONAL CATHEDRAL
SCHOOL (GLEE CLUB)
And
GERALD TRACY
Outstanding New York Pianist
Program includes Balnbridge Crist’s
' To a Water Fowl" conducted b? Composer
Tickets $1.59
On 8ale at Cappel Concert Bureau
In BALLARD S. 1300 O St. RE. 3509
and at National Cathedral 8chool
and at door
Proceeds (or Musie Scholarships
E.M.LOEWS MT. VSRnOn I
OPfcN AIR.
| RT. 1-3 Ml. SOUT-H QF AUfcXAnOttlA |
— LAST DAY
PADEREWSKI«
Mo OM LtGHf SOitAT^
NATIONAL • ™“ • SL'MML
KATHARINE CORNELL
CEDRIC HARDWICKE
"ANTIGONE"
(6 Nights & 2 Matinees)
Mon., May 13th thru Wed. Mat.
Sc Night, May 15 and again
Thurs., May 23rd. thru Sat. Mat.
Sc Night May 25th.
[ "CANDIDA"
(6 Nights Sc 2 Matinees)
| Thurs., Fri., Sat. Mat. Sc Night,
| May 16-17-18, thru Mon., Tues.,
| Wed. Mat. Sc Night, May 22nd.
MAIL ORDERS
— NOW —
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Mats. $ 1.20-$ 1.80-$2,40-Orch. $3.00 (tax inel.)
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