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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 11, 1947, Image 23

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LEATHER GIFTS
for Birthday or
Aanivertary
I. . . ore liftetime treasures when
they're chosen from Bertram's fine
accessory end luggage lines.
fL^O 14th it. Bet. Eye end Kg
25 From D. C. to Attend
Social Work Conference
About 25 Washington workers in
social service fields are expected to
attend the Cr '- />cc of Social
Work to to held in San Francisco
next week.
Ray L. Huff, director cf the Dis
trict Welfare Department, and
chairman of the area committee of
the coming conference, said many
Washington members would serve as
section chairmen or discussion lead
ers at the meetings.
M arquand Believes No Problem
Is Completely Resolved in Life
Noted Author Tells
* 1
Of Trouble in Ending
Newest Best Seller
By Miriam Ottenberg
When you meet people at a
party, there’s no one standing at
your elbow to tell you this one is a
very selfish person and that one is
kind to his mother.
John P. Marquand, author of the
best-selling ‘3. P.’s Daughter," be
lieves you should meet characters
In books in the same way, free from
the author’s interpretation of what
they are really like.
Talking about reading and writing
in an interview at the Mayflower
Hotel this week, Mr. Marquand ex
plained why he leaves so much to
the reader’s imagination in his own
books.
Illusion of Reality.
“So many writers,” he said, "try
to resolve every problem absolutely
and make everybody feel that the
characters lived happily ever after.
But no problem is completely re
solved in life. You can think every
thing is black and white. As soon
as you make it that way, you spoil
the illusion of reality.”
He admitted he came face to face
with the problem of an ending in
“B. P.’s Daughter.”
"I thought of Polly Pulton,” he
said, "as a very spoiled girl who had
a sharp lesson. Whether she made
the most of that lesson, whether she
got some other man or went back to
her husband, I don’t know.
as i came to me ena. x rnougni
of making a more definite decision.
I thought of her calling her husband
and saying, 'Let’s fix this thing up,’
or calling the soldier who had
malaria or doing something else
definite. Then I decided the reader
should make his own interpretation.
That’s one of the pleasures of
reading.”
Thinking of Next Book.
As he talked, the tall, spare New
Englander had to be reminded every
once in a while of a character's
name or a scene. He wasn’t posing.
It was simply that he’s now at the
thinking stage of his next book. As
far as he’s concerned, he’s done the
best he could with what went before,
and now it’s finished.
Unlike some authors, however, he
doesn’t have pride of authorship
;hat makes him believe every finished
product is perfect. He’s still not
sure he should have used the flash
back technique in "B. F.’s Daughter,”
whether it should have been written
chronologically or told entirely from
one character’s point of view. As
a matter of fact, he admits he got
himself into “quite a hot box” trying
to stick to the flashback method of
telling his story.
He showed obvious reluctance to
talk about the new book, other than
to say that it will be laid in a New
England town where the lines of
class distinction are sharply drawn.
"I cant even talk to my wife about
It,” he apologized. “As soon as I
start talking, it all becomes per
functory and it’s gone. On the other
hand, I know a lot of writers who
love to talk about what they’re
working on. It sounds wonderful,
JOHN P. MARQUAND.
—Star Staff Photo.
but they either don’t write it or,
when they do, it’s never as wonder
ful as it sounds.”
An impish gleam came into his
eyes as he talked about the egocen
tricity of some of hjs writer friends,
his own efforts to stay anonymous
enough to get his work done, and
the kind of questions people ask him.
He likes to think of the day of his
revenge.
“I went to the 20th anniversary of
a writers’ club,” he recalled. “I was
told some man was getting $1,000 for
each short story. I don’t know who
he was, and he didn’t know who
I was.
One of Old Favorites.
"I asked him if he wrote every
day or when the spirit moved him.
That’s one of the old favorites. He
said he thought it was better to
write every day.
“Then I asked him If he hires an
artist to illustrate his stories or
does the magazine do that. He
explained very carefully how that
worked.
“Finally, I said I had some good
ideas, but I just couldn’t seem to
get them on paper, and how would it
be if I dropped in to talk to him
about my ideas some time.”
Mr. Marquand settled back in his
chair with a deep sigh of satisfac
tion.
"I don’t know when I’ve had such
a good time," he said.
Howard Professor Named
To FEPC Council Post
Elmer W. Henderson of Chicago,
regional director of the wartime
Fair Employment Practices Com
mittee and sociology professor at
Howard University, has been ap
pointed executive secretary of the
National Council for a Permanent
FEPC. the council announced today.
The Rev. Allan Knight Chalmers
and A. Philip Randolph, co-chair
men of the council, explained that
Mr. Henderson’s appointment is part
of a council re-organization to as
sure broader support among co
operating organizations and indi
viduals.
Mr. Henderson was regional di
rector of the FEPC in eight Mid
western States during the war and
served the committee in other ca
pacities during its five years of
operation.
Previously, he was executive direc
tor for a legislative commission of
the Illinois Qenwd Assembly,
which studied conditions among the
calami population of that State In
1940. The commission’s report re
sulted In the passage of a non
discrimination bill covering Illinois
defense industries, according to the
council.
The new executive director will
be assisted by Paul Sifton, director
of legislative and public relations,
and Milo Manly, director of field
organization.
Alexandria Man. Heads
Alhambra Committee
Robert L. Nowland, 104 East Brad
dock'Road. Alexandria, has been
named head of the Membership
Committee of Alcantara Caravan,
Order of the Alhambra, social or
ganization within the Knight of
Columbus, it was announced today.
Mr. Nowland and his committee
are laying plans for an initiation of
candidates from Washington and
nearby Virginia May 18, at the K.
of C. Sail. 918 Tenth street N.W.
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HOW YOUR AIRLINES LAST YEAR BROUGHT THE SPEED AND
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CONVENIENCE OF AIR TRAVEL TO 175 MORE U.S. CITIES
♦ •
4
During 1946, your scheduled airlines opened up
26,000 miles of new sky routes. Many of these routes
are now flown two, six, a dozen times a day.
Thus, to new millions of people-in 175 more cities
have come the speed and convenience of travel by air.
The steady lengthening of U. S. air routes here and
overseas is just one proof of the steps being taken now
to render air service more efficient for all.
Together with new air routes comes the first of the post
war sky transports-the giant Douglas DC-6. This super
plane has already been delivered to the airlines —may
be in service by the time you read this. It will join the
four-engine Douglas DC-4s and famed DC-3s to Carry
over 90% of all airline passengers throughout the world.
On the ground, vast new airports an under construct
tion...new radar and radio devices, an being rapidly
installed to aid all-weather flying... and die delays often
caused-in ticket buying, baggage loading, and Bans*
portation to and from airports are being remedied.
Because folks want the speed and convenience of
flying...because it’s the modem way to go places ...there.
are limitless horizons for air travel.
At Douglas, our entire resources and quarter-century
of experience are devoted toward bringing you the kind
of fast, dependable aircraft that have made our nation
the most air-minded in all the world.
Douglas Aircraft Co. Inc.; Santa Monica, California
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