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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 23, 1947, Image 18

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__ Ormandy, Signed for a Movie,
| Knows Little of Hollywood
. * By Jay Carmody
Sooner or later, Hollywood’s faith that the greatest musicians are
none too good for moviegoers Is rewarded with the assent of another
superb artist to make a screen debut. Latest of these to agree to a
movie offer is Dr. Eugene Ormandy, conductor of the Philadelphia Sym
phony, who has just conducted two concerts here.
Unlike his predecessor, Leopold Stokowski, who entered quite Into
.. . sv_j r\i. • ■ ■ ... .. ■■
(die »rwvw,
mandy is impressively unimpressed
by his decision.
“Yes,” he told this inquisitor, “I
am going to Hollywood.”
"No,” he added hastily, "I have
never been there. I have no pre
conceived notions about it."
Did he know anything about the
picture?
“Not much,” he said. Not who is
in it. Not what it is about. In
tact, in a pleasantly amused way
Mr. Ormandy guessed he knew as
i little about his picture as anyone
; ever knew about a picture.
"I have not seen a script,” he
ir admits unblushingly. "We have
already recorded the music I am to
conduct. I do not have to act, which
I could not do. All I do is stand on
a podium and go through the mo
tions of leading an orchestra. I
, ' have done that and since I am play
ing myself, a character named Or
mandy, I do not think it makes
much difference whether I can act
f —which I can’t.”
Without having seen a script, Mr.
Ormandy thinks he already knows
his dialogue.
In selling him the idea, as the
I trade saying goes, that he should
■’ appear in the movie, the studio as
sured him he would not have to read
4 sides, or lines.
"I think,” he reflects aloud, "that
all I have to say, to the feminine
star of the picture, is something
like ‘Good luck.’ ”
ilt i i i
*
As the most unmovie-struck hu
* man in America, which Mr. Ormandy
almost certainly is, there is virtually
nothing he would not rather talk
% about than Hollywood and its pro
l liferous art.
He would not want anyone to get
the Impression that he has anything
' against the movies, anything per
sonal or impersonal.
“It’s Just that I don’t know much
j about them." he says. "I do not
* have time to go to the theater," he
explains.
The time aspects of a conductor’s
life, he thinks, are understood only
* by conductors. He is not greatly
- concerned about this, does not feel
» that any one need bother to correct
a false Impression. But he agrees
t readily that any impression which
5 assumes that a conductor has spare
time is flagrantly false.
“We are always busy with music,’1
J he says. “The orchestra, for ex
t ample, plays anywhere from 30 to
* 40 new compositions a year. These
must be ''selected from hundreds
which are submitted. An actress
has to look for only one play, or a
$ producer in the theater. But a con
ductor must look for many times
that number. He spends all his time
2 looking.”
On Sunday, for instance, before
his opening concert here Monday
night Mr. Ormandy found himself
with what the average person could
call a day off. .There were no re
.hearsals, no concerts, and no social
engagements.
“But I worked until 2 o’clock Mon
day morning,” he says.
* * * *
A drama critic’s somewhat logical
interest in whether a great sym
phony conductor ever is interested
j, , In the little music of the modern
theater leads him to the quick dis
covery that such is not the case. II
Mr. Ormandy ever has been within
earshot of the music of such cur
rent operetta hits as ‘‘Carousel,’
“Finian’s Rainbow” or the like—and
It seems impossible to avoid it—he
has been immune to it.
Mercifully immune, one gathers
* * * *
Mr. Ormandy would like a rest
or a reprieve, from so much music
but he does not seem to find it
despite a few safeguards he prac
tices. One of these is avoiding
summer engagements whi^h he feel£
can, and should, be left to youngei
conductors.
“They need the experience, I feel,’
he says, "and we older ones need th«
REACH, STRANGER!—When
Joel McCrea unlimbers these
shootin’ irons he means busi
ness. He’d drill a varmint
quicker ’n you could say
“Ramrod,” which is the name
of the picture in which he is
the noble hero. It opens to
morrow at the Capitol.
rest. Even if we don’t get the rest,
avoiding such engagements gives
them the experience. I had it in
my day and I think the new group
is entitled to the same opportunity."
One thing that delights Mr. Or
mandy about life, rest or no rest, is
that American music is growing so
well, so fast. It is getting a steadily
larger and much more vital and in
telligent audience, he feels. This is
something for which he thinks pub
lic school mpsic departments are de
serving of a great deal of credit.
Another thing he thinks, with a
touch of serenity, is that music
criticism is getting better, too.
Hollywood:
‘Years Ago* Gets
Spehcer Tracy,
Judy Garland
By Sheilah Graham
Judy Garland and Spencer Trac;
will star in the movie version o
“Years Ago," with Garson Kanii
directing—for Metro, «f course
Spencer is the spirit behind thi
deal and when Kanin was recentl;
in Hollywood he went to town or
selling him the idea of himself foi
the Fredric March role, and Jud;
for the part played by Ruth Gor
don in the play—which as you knov
Ruth authored. The papers haven’t
been signed yet, but they will be
Frank Sinatra has a lot of fight
scenes In “The Kissing Bandit!1
But they were written for Frankii
AMUSEMENTS ~
before his fight with Lee Mortimer.
And by the my, Jean Sablon guests
an the Sinatra show, April SO.
Robert Taylor, William Powell
and Deborah Kerr! How does this
stack up as a super-duper cast?
Sam Marx is after them for “This
Is Love.” He’s sure of the boys,
but there’s always a question mark
after Debbie’ because every pro
r ducer on the Metro lot is after the
l gal. It is definite by the way, that
i she will not be in “Luxury Liner”
! —the new title for “Maiden Voy
! age."
- Margaret O’Brien has already
i made $10,000 on the few records
- for children she made a couple of
' months ago. And I’m told that last
year, in radio shows alone, little
Miss O’Brien earned $37,000. No
; wonder Mrs. O’Brien has a nice
, little nest egg of $95,000 saved for
; Margaret from her five years in
’ pictures. And this in spite of Mag
i gie beginning with $150 a week and
AMUSEMENTS
staying at this figure for the first
few years of her career.
* * * *
Alan Marshall almost played
John Paige's role in “The Outcast”
for Republic. Director John Auer
spent days with Alan trying to
convince him that he was well
enough to return to pictures, but
it the last minute Alan said no.
and. they wanted Alan for the Pat
Knowles role in “Jvy” with Joan
Fontaine. Alan has not made a
picture since, “Bride by Mistake.”
He is still “owned” by; Selznick,
who reecives $75,000 for him when
tie can loan him—Alan would get
$3,000 weekly. But he te sow on
suspension until he wants to work
again.
Edward G. Robinson will be a
busy boy this year. He has just
added “The Mill of the Gods” to
his picture schedule. Robert Thoe
ren produces.
Donna Reed and Janet Leigh, and
Cameron Mitchell and Tom Drake,
are fighting respectively for the boy
and girl leads in "Alias a Gentle
man,” starring Wallace Beery. Janet
and Tom tested yesterday, and Don
na and Cameron are testing tomor
row. But Cameron says that the
part* has been promised hinf and he’ll
be very unhappy if anyone else gets
it- .
Lassie will be starred in "mils of
Home.” And how about having Nor
myi Taurog as the director? There
are lots of kids in this picture and
(See GRAHAM. Page A^St)
AMUSEMENTS
Constitution Hail Fri. Eve., Apr. 25, 8:30
Featured In "Humar
|
lu a Preiram tf Plane Muele With Comment,
lit 11.20. 01.00, >2.40. U. >3.60. Inal, tai
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LAST SHOW STA8.TS 10:15
MATINEE TODAY, 2:30
TONIGHT AT 8:30
I Seats at Box Office
| The Theater Guild
presents
LAURENCE
OLIVIER ,
t» WlffiaM Shakespeare's
“HENRY V"
fat TECHNICOLOR
Released thru UNITED ARTISTS
Only Engagement in Washington
Prices: Eyes.. $3.40, *1.80: Mats., SI.80.
$1.30 tax Incl. Choice seats available.
Little Theatre 608 9,11 s* N w
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i '1 ■ .—.
.AMUSEMENTS
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April 23-May 3
Ladiai Free TONIGHT
Spaciel Kiddies' Met. Sot. 1 -6 P.M.
AMUSEMENTS
mnw dTaNNA DURBIN
H* OAKES LAUGHTON
EIDS "BECAUSE OF HIM"
WED. JOAN OAVIS JACK OAKIE
Wt,‘ *OHE WNOTI THE NOOK*
Doors Open
1030 a. m.
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ROBERT MITCHUM
BRIAN AHERNE A
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1 < ^ Robert huton
MARIKA VICKERS
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Tvka m 2 M ML « t:1S ML
$1.20 $1 JO $2.40 $3.00 lad. iu
SEATS Of SALE AT
almas temple
1315 K St. N.W.
CLINE ARENA
3d A M Sts. N.E.
BALLARD’S
1300 G St N.W.
Tha llnatt SWw In Ttwa
INCLUDING THESE AMA2IHS AOS:
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largest, moot amailng bareback
riding art of all time, direct fro*
the "Blcgeet Show on Earth.’*
Famous Movla Horsoa !
FLICKER. TrtUNDBRHKAD and
SMOKY hi a parade aronnd the
arena and followed Immediately
by MONTANA KID and the
CAMPBELL SISTERS In a
unique and eeueational preeentn
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and Intelligence.
ELEPHANTS! ELEPHANTS! A
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★CLOWNS! CLOWNS! CLOWNSt
i
AMUSEMENTS
[—WEEKS—BEG. BEXT MON.
Internationally Famous Actress
c?^M BEHDMH
IN MARTUiVKIAS
JOEL ASHLEY
REDUCED PRICES/$3,00
EVtKW6Slt**tttSf2t! timKOWHEJTUWW
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—SEAT SALE WBW—
I NOW... Doors. Optn 1030 I
M G M’s TECHNICOLOR 1
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I 'THE 1
YEARLING
I GREGORY JANE I
L -rfSr PECK WYMAN I
corcerto" CLAUDE JARMAN, Jr.
JOEL McCREA ^VERONICA LAKE
'
.

.
»
Screenplay by Jack McJfitt, Graham Baker and Cecil* Kramer - imirm inner*
»d Saturday •“ • Music by Adolph Deutsch . Released thru UMUIJ ARlwTS
mARIO & FLORIA ST |
THE CROSBY SISTERS • THREE EBWA 1
Musicomedy Capers Sansa ||
I Professor BACKWARDS Jimmy Edmondson ^
FnricTnriau* “carnival in costa ricaw with dick haymes ♦ vera ellen
UIU5 I Ulidy 0, ttip.. LEONARD SUES • FRANK CQNVILLE • Bntitrri BRICKLAYERS
* ■ t > r

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