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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 27, 1947, Image 10

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U. S. Chamber Session
To Open Tomorrow;
State Dinners Planned
Businessmen from all parte of
the Nation began arriving here yes
terday to attend the 35th annual
meeting of the Chamber of Com
merce of the United States. By
tomorrow night- between 2,500 and
3,000 convention visitors are ex
pected.
Chamber officials report tickets
for all dinners and lunches are
sold out. Difficulty was found in
making hotel reservations for those
who waited until last week to apply.
Tickets for ' the annual dinner,
to be held in the Presidential Ball
room of the Statler at 7 pm. Thurs
day, have been gone for more than
a week. At the urging of members,
two additional rooms were obtained
and television sets will be suppplied
so those unable to get into the main
ballroom will be able to see and
hear Dr. James B. Conant, president
of Hardvard University, give the
principal address.
Open House Tomorrow.
Some 1,200 tickets were sold for
the main ballroom and another 400
for the additional rooms, a chamber
spokesman said. The Prank Ben
nett Singers of Chicago will be on
the entertainment program.
The meeting, the first in six years
to be held here, will officially open
at 10 a.m. tomorrow with open
house at the National Chamber
headquarters, 1615 H street N.W.
Visitors will be given a detailed ex
planation of various activities of the
National Chamber.
Tomorrow night 30 State congres
sional dinners will be held at various
restaurants. These will give the
visiting businessmen an opportunity
to have a meal and a talk with their
Senators and Representatives.
The first general session will be
held at the headquarters at 10 a.m.
Tuesday with Elmer H. Sexauer, a
vice president of the chamber, pre
siding. Subject for discussion is
"The World We Live In" and the
keynote address will be given by Earl
O. Shreve on "Waging World Peace,"
Lippmaon to Speak.
Walter Lippmann, the columnist,
will discuss "America's New Role in
the World." Secretary of the Navy
Forr estai will talk on "Armed
Strength and Safety."
A panel composed of Raymond
Swing, American Broadcasting Co.;
Eric Sevareid, Columbia Broadcast
ing System, and Richard Harkness,
National Broadcasting Co., will dis
cuss world peace. Albert Warner of
the Mutual Broadcasting System will
act as moderator.
Tuesday's luncheon meeting will
be at 12:30 pjn. in the Presidential
Ballroom of the Statler Hotel.
"American Opportunity" is the
theme of the meeting.
Vice President Carlyle Fraser will
preside. Speakers will be Dr. Henry
C. Link, vice president. Psychological
Corp., Ν. Y.; Leonard Trester, chair
man of the Chamber Subcommittee
on Advertising, and Arthur M. Hill,
chairman of the Executive Commit
tee of the Greyhound Corp., Charles
ton, W. Va.
Feed, Shelter to Be Discussed.
A discussion of food, shelter and
business will be held at the second
general session meeting at 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Norman P. Mason, presi
dent of the National Retail Lumber
Dealers Association, North Chelms
ford, Mass., will talk on housing.
Wheeler McMillen, editor of the
Farm Journal, Philadelphia, will
discuss the farm program of the
future. Chamber policies for the
period ahead will be explained by
William A. Klinger, chairman of
the Committee on Policy, Sioux City,
Iowa.
Henry Ford II will speak at the
7 p.m. dinner in the Statler. En
tertainment will be offered by Phil
Spitalny and His All-girl Orchestra.
Wednesday's morning session will
be given over to talks on taxes, the
public debt and expenditures. Harry
A. Bullis, president, General Mills,
Inc., Minneapolis; W. Randolph
Burgess, vice chairman of the Board
of the National City Bank, Ν. Y.,
and Fred R. Fairchild of Yale Uni
versity will be the speakers. Fed- j
eral Finance Committee Chairman j
Ellsworth C. Alvord will preside.
Six separate luncheon sessions are
scheduled for 12:30 pjn. Wednes
day.
Transport te be Topic.
Coming developments in transport
Will be discussed in the South Amer
ican Room of the Statler by Charles
P. McCormick of Baltimore, chair
man of the international Transport
Committee; R. V. Fletcher, Asso
ciation of American Railroads; John
V. Lawrence. American Trucking
Association, Inc., and E. S. Land,
Air Transport Association of Amer
ica, Inc., will talk on their special
phases of transportation.
The financing of education will
be discussed by Gov. Kim Sigler of
Michigan at the Statler's Con
gressional Room luncheon. Dr. Paul
Douglas, president of American Uni
versity, will be moderator of a panel
discussion. Participating will be Dr.
William G. Carr, secretary, Edu
cational Policies Commission; L. J.
Fletcher, director, training and
community relations, Caterpillar
Tractor Co., Peoria, 111., and Dr.
Ordway Tead, chairman of the
Board of Higher Education. New
York City.
A six-man panel will discuss bow
to counteract depressions at the
Presidential Ballroom luncheon. It
comprises Richard B. Heflebower.
economist, Brookings Institution;
Rufus S. Tucher, General Motors
economist; Howard R. Bowen, eco
nomist, Irving Trust Co., Ν. Y.;
George W. Terborgh, research di
rector, Machinery & Allied Prod
ucts Institute, Washington; William
S. Street, president, Frederick &
Nelson, Seattle, and C. O. Hardy,
staff director, joint committee on
the President's economic report.
Wade McCargo, president of H. V.
Balwin & Co., Richmond, will discuss
a merchandising program for a
smaller store at the luncheon at th"
Federal Room of the Statler. At
the same meeting Lowell B. Mason,
Federal Trade Commission, will dis
cuss his agency's work.
Minerals to Be Discussed.
Foreign and domestic mineral sup
ply will be discussed at a luncheon
at the Chinese Room of the May
flower Hotel. Speakers will be Otto
Herres, vice president of the Com
bined Metals Reduction Co., Salt
like City; Merle Becker, vice presi
dent of W. C. McBride, Inc., St.
Louis; Dr. Elmer Pehrson, chief,
economics branch, Bureau of Mines;
H. H. Hill, production department,
Standard Oil of New Jersey, and
Richard R. Deupree, executive
tions Board.
Woman's role in today's world will
be discussed at the women's lunch
eon in the Grand Ballroom of the
Mayflower. Mrs. Mildred McAfee
Horton, president of Wellesley Col
lege, will speak on an American
woman's viewpoint. Barbara Ward,
foreign editor of the London Econo
mist, will offer a British woman's
viewpoint.
Secretary of Commerce Harriman
will speak at the Wednesday dinner
to be held at 7 pm. in the Sapphire
Room of the Mayflower.
Halleck to Speak.
Thursday, the last day of the
meeting, will begin with talks on
"The People and Their Govern
ment" by Dr. Clark Kuebler, presi
dent of Ripon (Wis.) College; Ralph
Bradford, executive vice president of
the Chamber; House Majority
Leader Haleck and Mr, Kllnger of
the Policy Committee.
Dr. J. E. Hobson, director of the
Armour Research Foundation, Chi
cago, will speak on "Out of the Lab
oratory—a New Tomorrow" at the
luncheon in the Mayflower Ballroom.
The final session will be devoted
to a discussion of Government's
place In labor relations. The prin
cipal talk will be by Senator Taft,
Republican, of Ohio. The panel dis
cussion will be by George O. Bahrs,
president of the San Francisco Em
ployers' Council; Cyrus Ching, direc
tor of industrial and Public Rela
Professional Women
Told of Successes at
District Convention
Looking forward to other suc
cesses in its organization and ulti
mately to equal rights for women, the
Business and Professional Women's
Club of the District held its second
annual State Federation Conven
tion yesterday at the Hotel Statler.
Past progress of the group, or
ganized in 1927, and of the Na
tional Federation, organized eight
years earlier, was reviewed in a
morning session by a panel of five
prominent speakers. One point of
which the speakers were proudest
was the federation's indorsement
of entry by the United States into
iuc VYUiiu vuuib aiici nuiiu vtai
I. The Indorsement has been
amended since to make it thé
United Nations.
Panel speakers were Dr. Irma
Gene Nevins, health and safety
chairman of the federation; Miss
Mary Agnes Brown, former chair
man of the federation's Interna
tional Relations Committee; Mrs.
Lucy Howorth, chairman of the
Candidate Data Committee for the
federation; Miss Una R. Cobb,
president of the Virginia State
Federation, and Mrs. Gladys Oli
phant, president of the Maryland
State Federation. Miss Frances
Maulé, editor of the Independent
Woman, acted as moderator.
In a talk on "Understanding Latin
America," Dr. James Magner of
Catholic University, lecturer and au
thor of "Inter-American Affairs,"
pointed to the importance of Latin
America in future world affairs.
"Hie United States didn't become
really aware of the Latin American
countries until World War II," Dr.
Magner said, "but now imports from
there are three times as great as in
1939."
In another panel on "Problems of
Women in the World," members
from France, England and China
joined with Miss Doris Cochrane in
discussing the subject. They were
Mrs. Armand èerard, France; Mrs.
Margaret Tempest-Holmes, England,
on/4 Ά/rc C Ρ Wonrr PViino
At the opening of the meeting,
Henry Goddard Roberts, associate
professor of speech at George Wash
ington University, instructed mem
bers on parliamentary law.
G. W. Law Review Staff
To Hear Frankfurter
Associate Supreme Court Justice
Felix Frankfurter will be the guest
of honor at the annual dinner of
the George Washington University
Law Review staff at 7 o'clock tonight
at the Hotel Broadmoor, 3601 Con
necticut avenue N.W.
Justice Frankfurter will discuss
informally the work of the Law Re
view. John D. Upham, student edi
tor; James Forrester Davidson, fac
ulty editor, and Dean William Cabell
Van Vleck, of the law school, also
will speak.
tions, United States Rubber Co., New
York, and Jules D. Lippmann, presi
dent of the Textileather Corp., To
ledo.
Gwynne to Address
Trade Executives at
Meeting Tomorrow
The American Trade Association
Executives will hold their spring
meeting at the Statler Hotel begin
ning at 10 a.m. tomorrow, Ruth I.
Mulroy, executive secretary, an
nounced yesterday.
First speaker at the opening ses
sion will be Representative Gwynne,
Republican, of Iowa, who will dis
cuss labor relations.
Paul G. Hoffman, chairman of
the Committee for Economic De
velopment and president of the
Studebaker Corp., will talk on
"Management's Responsibility to
Capitalism."
Luncheon Planned.
J. E. Frawley, board chairman of
the American Hotel Association, has
as his topic "Current Hotel Policies
With Respect to Conventions."
At a luncheon to be held in the
Congressional Ballroom, Walter
Chamblin, jr.. an association vice
president, will talk on "Business
Under a Republican Congress."
At the afternoon session there will
be a panel discussion of "Adjust
ment of Trade Associations to
Peacetime Economy." Panel mem
bers are Wesley Hardenbergh, pres
ident, American Meat Institute; L.
Abbett Post, executive vice presi
dent, American Institute of Steel
Construction; George W. Romney,
?eneral manager of the Automobile
Manufacturers' Association, and
Merrill A. Watson, president of the
Institute ta Carpet Manufacturers
of America, Inc.
Admiral Paine to Speak.
Rear Admiral R. W. Paine will
deliver an address at the afternoon
session.
The Greater National Capital
Committee of the Washington
Board of Trade and the Washing
ton Trade Association Executives
will be hosts at a cocktail party to
morrow evening in the Ballroom of
the Mayflower Hotel. The hotel
management will be host at a buffet
supper to follow.
This afternoon at 2:15 o'clock an
American Airlines flagship will leave
National Airport with members of
the board of directors, their wives
and staff officials for an hour's
flight over Washington and nearby
areas.
G. W. Glee Club Concert
Is Set for Thursday
The George Washington Glee Club
will present its spring concert at
8:30 p.m. Thursday at the Shore
ham Hotel.
Dr. Robert Howe Harmon, uni
versity physician, who organized the
group in 1924, will conduct the 120
voice chorus. Mrs. Grace R. Har
mon will be the accompanist. The
glee club's annual dance will fol
low the concert.
Visiting Police to Study Here
Sergt. Andrew P. Crabtree, Port
land, Oreg., and Lt. Wyman W.
Vernon, Oakland, Calif., student
police officers attending the North
western University Traffic Insti
tute's police administration course,
will begin a one-week study of the
Metropolitan Police Department
starting May 5.
New-Mexico U. Alumni
To Hold Reception
New Mexico's congressional dele
gation will be special guests at *
reception and dinner of University
of Mew Mexico alumni next Friday
honoring Dr. J. Philip Wernette,
university president.
The affair will be held at 7:30 pan.
in the Roger Smith Hotel.
In the receiving line with Dr.
Wernette will be Senator and Mrs.
Hatch, Senator and Mrs. Chavez,
Representative and Mrs. Fernandez
and Representative Lusk.
Sidney Hertzmark, chairman of
the Washington alumni association,
is in charge of reservations.
Hotel Manager Charges
Desertion, Asks Divorce
Neil S. Allen, general manager of
the Roosevelt Hotel, yesterday
brought suit in District Court asking
for divorce from Mrs. Mildred Y. B.
Allen, of New York, on a charge of
desertion.
The Aliens were married in 1834,
according to the suit, which says
Mrs. Allen left her husband in Au
gust, 1944. Mr. Allen, who is 38,
is represented by Attorney Manuel
J. Davis.
Vermont U. Reunion
Graduates of the University of
Vermont will.hold their annual Re
union here at a dinner in the Hotel
2400 at 7 pm. Wednesday. Dr. J.&
Millis, president of the university,
will address the group.
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1 Pr. Nylons. Reg. Price 1.69
1 Pr. Rayons. Reg. Price. 89
1 Pr. Pure Silk. Reg. Price.2.49
Total Value 5.07
au 3 for 2,94
Open 'Til 6 P.M.
Saturdays 'Til 7 P.M.
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MEN'S SPORT
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Man? All wool.
CLEARANCE
LADIES' SHOES
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Were 2.95 to 5.95
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Take m Lont Time
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LADIES' COATS
AND SUITS
Warm 29.95 to 49.95
NOW
Open · Charte Account
MEN'S SUITS
ud TOPCOATS
Wmrm 29.75 to 49.75
NOW
19.94
I'SE LONG'S CREDIT
MEN'S HATS
Pelts- wools (many na
tionally famous brands),
some soiled or shopworn,
narrow and wide brims.
Wmrm 3.95 to 8.95
1.84
NOW
OSE LONG'S CREDIT
MEN'S SPORT
COATS
Leisure and Cardigans
Were up to 19.75
NOW
9.94
Many lOOf» Wool
mmmmm
Clearance
Ladies' Hats and
Handbags
Were 2.95 to 4.95
n°w 34®
No Dawn Payment
MenVand Ladies'
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BIRTHSTONE RINGS
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now 4.84
Plus Fed. Tax
P5S
~1
SHIRTS
(Dress and sport, white
and assorted colors)
Were 4.9S
n°w 2.34
Tike a Lonf Time to Pay
I
..
LADIES DRESSES
Were up to 14.95 each
Now 2 'or 10"
I
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2-Door Electric
TOASTERS
Ware S.80
n°w 2.44
USE LONG'S CREDIT
LADIES' EVENING
GOWNS
Assorted colors, styles
and sizes.
Were 14.95
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IMPORTANT NOTICE
Fire, Ambulance and Police
Emergency Telephone Calls
Due to the telephone strike, operators may not be available to assist on calls
for fire, ambulance and police. The public is requested to remember these
directions in event of emergency:
To Report a Fire . · . . DIAL HObart 1616
WASHINGTON To Call the Police .... DIAL NAtionàl 3313
To Call the Park Police . · . DIAL District 1400
To Call an Ambulance · · . DIAL HObart 3322
FIRE—AMBULANCI—OR POL ICI
Bradley-Oliver-Wisconsin § . . DIAL Oliver 3205
MARYLAND Hyatts ville-Union-War field . . DIAL UNion 1122
Olympic-Pleasant .... DIAL PLeasant 1122
Tower DIAL TOwer 5151
Shepherd-Sligo-Silver Spring . DIAL SHepherd 3200
Marlboro DIAL MArlboro 3417
Rockville DIAL ROckville 2345
Greenbelt ·.·..· DIAL GReenbeh 2011
ATT. NON-DIAL (MANUAL) TELEPHONE SUBSCRIBERS
Flash Your Receiver Hook Up and Down Slowly and Report the Emergency.
PLEASE CUT THIS OUT AND KEEP NEAR YOUR TELEPHONE
The Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company

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