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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 28, 1947, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1947-04-28/ed-1/seq-7/

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Grand Jury Indicts
Man in Assault on
Woman in Apartment
Louis F. Taylor, 27, colored, of
the 1600 block of Gales street NJS.,
today was Indicted by the grand jury
on a charge of raping a 25-year-old
woman last February 15 in her
apartment in the 1200 block of North
Capitol street.
The indictment charges that he
again entered her apartment on
March 1 intending to repeat the
crime. On that date the woman's
assailant, after a struggle, was
pushed from a porch by a neighbor
who came to the woman's assistance.
He was summoned when the woman
rapped on the floor with a mop
handle, according to an arrange
ment they had made if any one
again entered her apartment.
Taylor denied that he committed
the offenses.
The indictment was among 32
returned before Chief Justice
Bolitha J. Laws of District Court
by the grand 1ury.
3 Fugitives Indicted.
Three colored men, who had
uru&cii uui υι une v/tbuquaii tvc
forma tory were indicted on a charge
of stealing an automobile. They
are Lavere G. Hawkins, 21, colored,
4600 block of Meed street N.E.; Earl
Forest, 27, colored, 600 block of
Twentieth street N.E., and George
Searls, 21, colored, oi the 900 block
of Ο street N.W.
Murry Robey, 49, colored, of the
1100 block of Fifth street N.E., was
indicted on a charge of first degree
murder in the fatal cutting of Rob
ert Toney, 33, colored, of the 200
block of G street N.W., on March 2.
Nathan H. Crider, 58, of the 800
block of Van Buren street N.W., who
was employed as a mechanic at the
City Postoffice, was charged with
detaining and opening four letters
on February 20.
2 Indicted in Hospital Theft.
Among others indicted were Fran
cis C. Davis, 28, colored, of the first
block of Fenton street N.E., and
Willy Grays, 33. colored, of the first
block of I street N.W., who were
accused of taking 100 sheets belong
ing to Providence Hospital.
Wong Dok Hong, 42, Chinese, 700
block of Sixth street N.W., was in
dicted on narcotic charges.
Two men were charged with vio
lating the Selective Service Act. One
of the men was Herman Hare Coley,
23, colored, address unlisted, who
was accused of failing to report for
induction into the service and also
for failing to submit to physical
examinations.
The other man was listed as Harry
E. Mason, 40, whose address also was
Unlisted, who was accused of failing
to report for induction, failing to
keep his Selective Service Board ad
vised as to where mail would reach
him, failing to report for a physical
examination and failing to execute
a form of alien personnel history.
Toneman round Guilty
Of Swindling Woman
A man once regarded as an out
standing Boy Scout was ίοΜίΊ
guilty today by a District Court
jury of embezzling $590 from a
woman.
Paul A. Toneman, sr., 32, of the
1200 blcclc of Sixteenth street N.W.,
was accused by Miss Mildred O'Neal
of the 2600 block of Woodley place
N.W. of obtaining the money by
promising her he could invest it so
she would get a $250 dividend in 30
days and «imilar dividends each
month.
At the time Toneman was ordered
held for trial. Assistant United
Staves Attorney John B. Diamond
told the court that in 1944, when
Toneman was in the Army, Mrs.
Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a $2.
500 bank note for him. Mrs. Roose
velt had to "make good" the note,
Mr. Diamond said.
Defense Council Eugene Bryan
then described Toneman as a
"friend of Mrs,.- Roosevelt" who first
came to her attention "when he was
regarded as one of the outstanding
Boy Scouts in America."
During the trial, Justice Alexander
HoltzofT remarked that the "gullible
need to be protected «ven more than
the wise." Toneman was prosecuted
by Assistant United States Attorney
John P. Burke. Justice Holtzoff did
not set a date for sentencing.
Most Hordwood Is in East
Most of the hardwood forests of
the United States are found in the
East, the Western hardwoods being
found mostly in river bottoms and
valleys.
i WED 64 YEARS—Mr. and Mrs.
. John W. Sherbert of 2431
Thirty-third street SJÏ., who
recently celebrated their 64th
i wedding anniversary. They
1 have 11 children, 39 grandchil
j dren and 25 great-grandchil
: dren. —Star Staff Photo.
Philippines Pian to Sell
Million Tons of Scrap
By th· Associated Press
MANILA, April 28.—The Philip
pines plan to sell more than 1,000,
000 tons of scrap iron and steel· to
the highest international biader.
President Roxas said today first
attention would be given to salvage
of between 280 and 400 ships sunk in
Manila Bay. The successful bidder
will be required to remove the entire
hulls of sunken ships.
Next, metal will be placed on sale
at various collection points through
out the islands. Much of the scrap
is still on battlefields.
Japs Honor Dead Rabbits
TOKYO, April 28 (JP).—'The Min
amibayashi Rabbit Breeding Station
held a memorial service yesterday
for rabbits that have given their
lives for their country, either in
medical experiments or for pelts for
export.
Boy and Girl Scouts
Given Annual Awards
At Catholic Rally
Washington Boy and Girl Scouts
received awards yesterday for outi
standing service to the Catholic
church during the annual Catholic
Boy and Girl Scout observance at
the Sylvan Theater. Nearly 500
Scouts and their families partici
pated.
The archbishop's medal to the
outstanding man and woman in
scouting also was presented at the
rally, held under the sponsorship of
the Catholic Committee on Scouting
of the Archdiocese of Washington.
rThis award was presented to Mrs.
Victor. S. Mersch, chairman of Dis
trict 3 of the Girl Scouts, and Joseph
F. Robinson, Scoutmaster of Troop
96, Nativity Parish.
Ad Altare Dei Crosses were pre
sented to John P. Breen, John P.
McMorrow, Thomas P. Fitzgerald,
Candido Palting, Paul E. Richard
ton, Malcolm Stewart, Wallace
Whelan and Marvin Stewart.
Girl Scouts receiving the Matei
Dei medal were Florence Coleman.
Anne McCormack, Ami Louise
Rappe, Mary ODea, Margaret Ann
Buckler, Mary J. Dahlstedt. Betty
Ann Burke. Edith Ellis, Ellen
Hughes, Jeanette Le'oel, Clare Mc
Nabb, Patricia Meehan. Alice Marie
Curtin, Mary Ann Edelen. Mary
Ann Fisher, Minarosc Lorditch,
Mary Frances Lyons, Joan McCar
ron, Ann Maiatico, Carol Ann Sy
mons, Cecilia Green. Mary Therese
Moynihan. Lois E. Schmitt, Mary
Jeanne Stock. Patsy Beck, Mary
Lou Beck, Marjorie K. Brearton,
Carolyn Crowder, Mary Alice
Crowder, Noreen Cummings, Joan
M. Dugan, Mary C. Garrity, Suz
anne Hixon, Catherine Kemp,
Sheila McDuell, Catherine Reilly,
Mary E. Rogers, Margaret Johann
Usilton and Mary Catherine Walsh.
The awards were presented by the
Rev. Edward Fuller, S. J., Washing
ton arty scout chaplain. The Rev.
Joseph L. Wingler, chaplain of the
Diocese of Richmond, preached.
The ceremony was closed with the
Benediction oi the Blessed Sacra
ment.
RAF Abandons Search
For Vessel Off Burma
■y th« Associated Pr«s
RANGOON, April 28.—The RAF
announced yesterday it was aban
doning a search for the 1,000-ton
coastal vessel Sir Harvey Adamson,
missing since April 17 with 250 pas
sengers aboard.
Two RAF search planes made a
final «weep off the Burnt coast
without finding any trace et the
ship, which British nevel sources toe·
lieve may have struck a stray mine.
Surface craft are continuing the
search. The Adamson was en route
to Tavoy when she disappeared.
\A/|N5L0W^
Λ/Vpaints^
1
Helpful Hints
on how to make your home more beautiful,
en η be obtained, by just listening in each
Saturday, Station WMAL. to Betty Moores.
Benj. Moores decorating expert at 10 a.m.
This Saturday, May 3rd. her subject will be
thé Forward Kitchen. All products recom
mended by Betty M"ore may be purchased
at any one of these Winslow Associated
Stores.
Chevy Chase Paint tc Hardware Co.
Silver Sprint Paint It Hardware Co.
Bethesda Paint ti Hardware Co.
Takoma Paint A Hardware. Co.
Beeker Paint Λ das· Co., Georgetown
Local Paint Λ Hardware Co., Hyattsrille
922 New York Aye. (1) NA. «610
Menu Idea
POR MM
Today
With the Fine Flavor
of Blue Plate
Mayonnaise
I
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Sandwiches for Spring
—with the fresh, inviting
taste of Blue Plate Mayonnaise
Salmon, J cup flaked
Sont pickle, 1 tablespoon
chopped
Pickle juice, 1 tablespoon
Onion, 1 teaspoon finely
minced
Blue Plate Mayonnaise,
2 to 3 tablespoons
MCKie , . r _
Mix all ingredient* together lightly, using sufficient Blue
Plate Mayonnaise to moisten thoroughly. Of course, youll
spread the sandwich bread with Blue Plate Mayonnaise too—
for more of that tempting flavor everybody loves. This
amount makes generous filling for 4 full-sized sandwiches.
I
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Made by the Wesson Oil people
as you'd make it at home
—with fine salad oil
Blue Plate
Mayonnaise
BLUE PLATE MEANS FINE FLAVOR
A Saje Depository for Over 55 Years
jfcurifg Jftoragr (Jompang
Affiliated with the American Security & Trust Co.
1140 Fifteenth St. (5) N.W.
Safe Deposit Vaults for Silverware
and Other Valuables
Cold Storage Vaults for Furs
and Garments
LONG-DISTANCE MOVING
"Around the corner or around the world—MOVE BY VAN"
SECURITY steel "lift" vans for overseas removals, ALLIED
VANS for domestic removals
DIRECTORS
C. A. Aspinwall, President
Daniel W. Bell H. L. Rust. Jr.
William J. Flather, Jr. Corcoran Thom
Chauncey G. Parker, Jr. Lloyd B. Wilson
Pure Vermont
MAPLE SYRUP
(PREPAID DELIVERED PRICES)*
ONE QT $2.19
HALF GALLON 3.79
ONE GALLON 6.95
Sorry, no C. O. D. orders accepted.
•Add 75c for over 25· miles.
Molt· checks and money orders payable to
LAURENCE A. KORAN
121 -CHANNING ROAD
WATERTOWN 72, MASS.
P. S. Your friends end relatives Out
West or Down South would like
this precious New England sweet
Business concerns—Why not ihip
some to your friends, employes and
customers? Quantity orders filled.
RENOVIZING
by the EBERLY PLANI
ONE responsibility OURS
A. Eberly'i Sons ΠΙ 6557
Ιΐββ Κ Street N.W.
LINOLEUM
ASPHALT TILE
AND SINK TOPS
Floor Machines Rented
SANDERS—EDGERS—WAXERS
WE ALSO
SANO AND REFINISH FLOORS
LONG ·λΛ STONE FLOOR SERVICE
RA. 5717—RA. 93)0
' Adam Κ, Weschler L· Son, Auctioneers
Large Attractive Sale of New
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
' Lionel and. American Flyer
ELECTRIC TRAINS ft ACCESSORIES
Fluorescent and Other
LIGHTING FIXTURES
OSCILLATING AND PEDESTAL FANS
WASHING MACHIHE
Appliances include: Toasters, Coffee Makers, Automatic Iron·, Casseroles.
Hot Plates. Heatint Pads and Heaters. Hair Dryers. Razors, etc . also Fluorescent
Desk and Bed Lamps. Show Case Fixtures, Bed Spot Lamps, etc.
BY AUCTION
at WESCHLER'S, 90S Ε Street, N.W.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30th
Commencing 10 o'clock A.M.
LIFE INSURANCE
£ô4M4,
If 70α have an existing loan on four life insur
ance, you probably can save money by refinanc
ing it through this bank at a low interest rate.
* .
If you are planning to make a new life insurance
loan, the same low rate will apply. You need
not be a depositor to qualify. Applications may
be made at either of our two convenient offices.
OTHER LOANS'
Nrt«wl Lnii ImI fatat* Lmm
Iwtar till Imm ·. I. L»ni
Hew AM· Lmm Η·μ··Η·Ι4 lquipm«Rf Lmm
/
How To End The Telephone Strike
ONE UNION—TltE MARYLAND FEDERATION OF TELEPHONE WORKERS, INC—
just reached a settlement through local bargaining and agreed to return to work while
disputed issues, including basic wage rates, are decided by local arbitration.
%
Settlement Of The Strike In Washington
' H
Depends On Two Important Issues
THE FIRST ISSUE
IS. WAGES
WE BELIEVE THAT our basic wages are
good. The Unions disagree. Here are the figures—
Typical Telephone Wages For A Five-Day Week
*
Basic .
Starting Wages .. . ICw»
(In Training) Max,mum Wages
Operators $29 $44
Stenographers 29 49
Installer-Repairmen 31 72
Central Office Repairmen
and Cable Splicers 31 76
(In many cases, the above wages are increased
by overtime, holiday or Sunday work, night work,
etc.)
We Offered Local Arbitration Of This Issue
Local arbitration simply means letting three
impartialj residents of this area, who are not asso
ciated with either the telephone company or any
union, settle the question of wages after reviewing
the facts and giving consideration to both sides.
This offer has been made to the District
Federation of Telephone Workers.
It is also available to the Washington
Telephone Traftic Union.
THE SECOND ISSUE
IS NATIONAL BARGAINING
«
WE BELIEVE THAT telephone wag··,
Ilk· telephone rat··, should b· settled
locally. Our wag·» ar· based on th· loeal
community pattern, and Washington tele
phone employees' wages, paid for by
Washington customers, should be settled
here in Washington.
WE BELIEVE THAT agreements can be
reached on contracts by bargaining locally with
the Unions if they are free of outside control. It
has been done this way in Washington in the past.
It was just done this way in Maryland.
National telephone bargaining would give the
Unions nation-wide power—BUT WITHOUT
REGULATION—over such an essential public
service as the telephone.
WHY DO THE UNIONS REFUSE SUCH A FAIR METHOD
OF SETTLEMENT AS LOCAL ARBITRATION?
Why won't they submit their dispute to three impartial neighbors in this area? , J
Is it because they believe a wage increase cannot be justified?
Or is it because thiy cannot move without the approval of the National Federation of Telephone
Workers with which they are affiliated?
We Are Endeavoring to Carry Out Our Responsibilities
• ' * ' I
to Customers and Employees Alike, ι ι
%
'r " 4. /
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%
The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company
It « I I'
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