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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 09, 1947, Image 17

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1947-06-09/ed-1/seq-17/

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D. C. Bankers Return
Highly Pleased by
29th Convention
By Edward C. Stone
District Bankers Association mem
bers were back at their desks to
day, with high praise for their 29th
annual convention at the Bedford
Springs Hotel, Bedford, Pa.
At the business sessions the dele
gates were told that the banks were
never in a sounder condition, that
business is now in a ‘ boom stage"
and that any extended depression
late this year seems unlikely. They
also heard plenty on the gloomy
aide of the picture in World affairs.
The five-day program ended Sat
urday night with the ‘‘family din
ner" at which the sports awards
w'ere announced, amid great ap
plause, as follows:
Hatton Cup—-Won by Rhomas H. Rey
nold*: low gross. Roger J. Whiteford:
second low net- W. Hiles Pardor ' ^op
Fleming Cup—Robert V. Fleming, Robert
W. Fleming. A M McLachlen. Wright
Cup—Landra B. Platt,. Richard W. Mil
ler. C. Ba.vne Marbury. Hibbs Cup—
W. J. Waller, Aubrey O. Dooley, A. Scott
Offutt.
Corby Cup—J. Robert Sherwood. J. McD
8hea. T. Howard Ducket. Eleanor Pat
■ erson Cup—Mrs. Landra Platt. Mrs.
Harry J. Kane. jr.. Mrs. Don S. Birney
Shannon Cup—W. P. Folger, George M
r A hann!i»r ir \A r To rVi i PC
Cup— Harry J Kame jr . J. B Wallace.
F Tracy Campbell. Ladies Putting Con
test—Mr*. L. P. Hallett. jr., Mrs. T. W
Perry. Mr*. Stanlet Carr
Gruver Horseshoe Pitching Cup—Jam?.*
B. Edmunds. Lester A. Lawrence, second.
Caroll Morgan Tennis Cup—Stanley Carr,
Albert E. Yeatman. runner-up.
A terrific electrical storm flooded
the golf course Saturday morning
Pools of water stood all over the
course and in the afternoon many
of the Capital's most dignified bank
ers played off the finals barefooted.
Echoes of Bankers’ Conclave.
S. William Miller, retiring presi
dent, was presented a handsome
watch for his “outstanding service
to the association.”
Rogert J. Whiteford was master
of ceremonies at the annual dinner
and G. Elmer Flather announced
the »ports results.
Luvius V. Friedli, veteran court
reporter, officially recorded the pro
ceedings for the twenty-fifth time.
Kenneth O. Hulse reported that
men now outnumber women in
Washington Chapter, American In
stitute of Banking, for the first time
in years.
James B. Edmunds, Chesapeake
& Ohio'passenger agent, known to
all Washington bankers through
past conventions, was among those
present.
Bond Drive Support Pledged.
Resolutions adopted pledged sup
port of the banks in the Treasury's
present drive to increase the sale
of Series E, F and G Bonds. The
. , . ■* _V.., A hyf
I COUIUI VV r. A s.. **•
McLachlen for Chairman Charles
H. Doing who was unable to be
present.
Bruce Baird, who arranged for
the cr^vention speakers, did not
hear the addresses as he is now' on
the West Coast.
Emil %chram. head of the New
York Stock Exchange, made an ex
ceptionally fine address comparing
free enterprise with the Russian
way of life.
Richard A. Norris, the new presi
dent, will announce his standing
committees for the coming year
shortly.
Business Briefs
Steel Mill Operations for the cur
rent week were scheduled at 96.9%
of capacity, indicating production of
I, 695.700 net tons—American Iron
Sc Steel Institute. Figures last week
were 9774 and 1.697.400 tons, a
month ago. 94.2% and 1 648.400; a
year ago, 76.1% and 1,341,200.
Meat Supplies next year will be
the smallest since 1941. but this
year's supplies will be sufficient for
a per capita consumption averaging
between 150 and 155 pounds, high
est average in 35 years—Agriculture
Department.
Jewel Tea Co. stockholders ap- j
proved a plan to issue 75,000 shares j
of 354 % $100 par cumualtive pre
ferred stock and increase authorized
common stock to 900,000 shares
from 600.000. The preferred will be
offered publicly.
Hookei- Electrochemical Co. stock
holders will vote June 26 on a plan
to split common stock 2 for 1 and
authorize a new issue of 200,000 pre
ferred shares.
Public Service Co. of Colorado has;
: a _ j i: _ » _ T__ J *7 (40 .
ui' m u uiu.-* up w ui»v * ■
000.000 of first mortgage bonds, due t
1977, and $7,000,000 more of 3% con-!
vertible debentures, w'hich will be
offered for subscription first to com
mon stockholders.
Peabody Coal Co. directors will
meet. June 12 to conside- the pro
posed redemption of all Class A:
stock as initial step in a recapitali
zation program.
Mid-Continent Petroleum Corp.!
will spend $8,500,000 in expanding
and modernizing its refinery at West
Tulsa, Okla„ Chairman Jacob
France .announced.
Atchison, Topeko A- Santa Fe
Railroad ,plans to spend from $6.
000,000 to $10,000,000 on freight
terminal expansion near Kansas
City, Mo, official disclosed.
Electric Power & Light Corp.
earned $7,737,127 in the March quar
ter vs. $6,237,888 a year ago.
Southern Railway System reported
May operating revenues of $24,532,
485. a gain of $4,907,829 from a year
ago. Revenues for five months of
1947 totaled $122,515,311. an increase
of $11,463,810.
Bond Stores. 1nc„ sales for May
totaled $7,101,951. a rise of 26.3%
from a year ago: for five months,
*32.535:255, an increase of 25.7%.
McCrory Stores Corp. sales in May
totaled $7,127,588. a jump of l§»7c;,
from a year ago: in hve months.
$32,248,062. a gain of 9%.
Wieboldt Stores. Ine., sales for 13
weeks ended April 26 totaled $13.
504.490, a gam of 8.5% from a year
ago: for 39 weeks ended the same
date. $44,876,395. a rise of 21.9%.
Investment C o. of America re
ported net asset value on May 31
was equal to $24 91 a common share
vs. $25.55 a month ago and $37.77
a year earlier.
Sharpe & Dohme, Inc., has pur
chased a large Government manu
facturing plant at North Wales. Pa.,
from the WAA for $1,750,000.
Safeway Stores directors voted to
call for redemption 4,452 shares of
5% preferred stock on October 1 to
meet regular sinking fund require
ments. The regular dividends were
declared payable July 1.
Booth Fisheries Corp..has acquired
the business and inventories of
Omco Frosted Foods. Inc., distribu
tors of Polar Brand frozen foods in
the Chicago area.
Eastern Air hines has concluded
an agreement with Peoples Express
Co. for pickup and delivery of air
freight throughout the New York
area.
Allts-Chalmers Mfg. Co. appointed
William A. Roberts and William C.
Johnson executive vice presidents of
the tractor division and the general
tfcgchincry division, respectively.

N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE j
(Famished hr the Associated Press.)
Sales—
Stock and Add Net
Dividend Rate. 00. High. Low. 2:30. enge.
ABBOTT LAB2a 3 76 76 76 + %
A C F-Brli! Mot 1 7% 7% 7%
Acme Steel i ’<g. 3 *5 *4% 44%
Adams Exp V4g_ 2 14% 14% 14%+%
Addresso i .35g- 3 31% 31% 31%
Air Reduction »1. 6 30 29% 30
Alaska Juneau . 3 4% 4% 4%
Alleghany CorP 9 3% 3% 3%
Alleghany CP pf 6 27% 27 27 + %
AllegLudStl .80g 4 33% 33% 33% - %
‘ AI Chm dt Dye 6 1 173 173 173 + %
I Allied Stores 3 10 33*% 32% 32% - %
Allis Chaim 1 60 7 32% 32% 32% - %
j Allis ChM pf SYs 2 92% 92% 92% + %
AmalLeath 20g 1 5% 5% 5% — %
1 Amerada Pet 21 80% 80% 80%+ %
Am Airlines 12 8% 8% 8% + %
AmBankN ) ,20g 2 22% 22% 22%
! AmBrkShoe Vsg 1 40 40 40 + %
Am Cable & Rad 3 4% 4 4% — %
Am Can 3, 3 91% 91 91% + %
, 'Am Can St 7 40 190 190 190 +1%
Am CardcFdy 3e 3 38% 38% 38% — %
Am CardcF pf 7 1 96% 96% 96%
AmCh&Cb! t 40 2 21 21 21 + %
'Am Ch*C pf 5 50 106 106 106 + Vs
'Am Chicle 4a 30 139 139 139 —1
Am Distillers 2a 1 28% 28% 28% — %
Am Encaustic . 1 4% 4% 4%
■ Am Export L 2_. 1 10 18 18 + %
Am A Frn Pwr 78 2% 2% 2% - %
; Am AFP 7pf3Y*k 2 102 102 102 - %
Am&F P« pf 3k 2 91% 91 91 -%
Am A F P 2d rf 9 15% 15% 15% - %
Am Hawaii S3 1 39 39 39 - %
Am HldedtLeath 3 6 6 6
Am HddcLe pf 3 11 53 53 53
Am Home 1 20a 7 24 23% 23% + %
Am Ice %g 1 6% 6% 6%
Am Inv HI SO 2 12% 12% 12% - %
Am Locoml .40a 10 20% 19% 20 — %
Am Locom pf 7 2 110* no* no* f *
Am Mch&Fd .80 6 18* 18* 18* - *
Am Metal 1 . 1 27* 27* 27* + *
AmNewsCo 1 Via 1 29* 29* 29* + Vi
' Am Power & Lt 16 10* 9* 10 — Vi
AmP&L 5pf33,ic 1 99* 99* 99*
AmRadlator.dog 7 13* 13* 13* — *
Am Roll Mill lg 11 26* 26i-a 26*
i Am Sale Ra? 1 a 3 11* 11* 11*
Am Seating Vie. 1 15* 15* 15*
Am Smelt&R 2a 5 53* 52* 52*- *
tAm S&R pf 7 _ 30 166* 166 166*
Am Stl Pound 2 1 27* 27* 27* + *
Am Stores 1 05g 1 23* 23* 23* - *
AmSugRef 2Vag 1 38 38 38
Am Bug R pf 7 . 1 131* 131* 131* +1*
Am Tel & Tel 9 33 163* 162* 162* -1*
Am Tobacco 3a 1 69* 69* 69*+ *
Am Tobac B 3a. 17 70* 70 70*+ *
Am Viscose 2 6 47* 47 47
tAm Viscose Pf5 10 118 118 118 — *
Am Water was. 7 13* 13* 13*-*
Am Woolen 3g 10 19 28* 28* - *
Am Wool pf 7__. 1 91 91 91
Am Zinc .20g 2 6* 6* 6* + *
AnaconCop l*g 15 33* 32* 32*- *
. Arch-Daniel Vag 1 31 31 31 — *
Armour & Co 21 11* 11 11 — *
Armour prl.4Vak 4 115 114*115 +1*
fArmstrng Pf3Vi 50 103 103 103 + *
Assd Dr.v G ) .80 7 15* 15* 15* - *
Atch T & S F 6 . 8 75* 74* 74* + *
ATP Inc tig 1 11* 11* 11*- *
Atl Coast Line 4 1 47 47 47 — *
Atl G&W Ind 3* 7 24* 23* 24 + *
Atl Refining IVi * 33* 33 33 — *
tAtl Reflng Pf 4 20 110 110 110 -1
tAtl Ref pfB33i 70 102 101* 102 + *
Atlas Corp 1.80 4 24 23* 23* — *
tAtlas Powdr 1 g 30 62* 62* 62*+ *
Avst-tn Nichols 1 6* 6* 6*
Autocar Co lg 3 22 21* 21*+1*
Auto Canteen 1_ 1 20* 20* 20*— *
AveoMfe.lOg . _ 7 5* 5 5
BABBITT 1.20a 2 13* 13* 13*-*
Bald Loco * g x 4 17* 17* 17*— *
Balt * Ohio_ 4 9* 9* 9* - *
Balto & Ohio Pf 3 13* 13* 13* — *
tBang & Ar pf 5 20 60 60 60 —1*
Barber As 34g _ 2 50* 49* 50* +1
Barker Br *g 2 20* 20* 20*+ *
Barnsdafl Oil la 24 26 25* 25* - *
BayukCigars la 2 18* 18* 18*+ *
iBeck Sh pi 4* 10 105* 105* 105* + *
Beech Aircraft 2 6* 6* 6* — *
Beech-NPacl .40 1 31* 31* 31*+1
iBell&Hw pf4‘/4 10 106 106 106 + *
Beneficial 1.20a 3 23* 23* 23* + *
BestPoods 1 .20a 2 22* 22* 22* — *
Reth Steel 8 8 80* 79* 79* - *
Bigelow-Sanf 2g 1 48% 48% 4B% % %
Black & Deck 2 x 1 26 26 26
Blaw-Knox .40g 3 143% 14% 14% - % j
Bliss E W 6 23 22*% 23 + % 1
Bliss EW Df 2 Ml 1 46 46 46 + 1%
Boeing Air lg 4 14% 14’% 143%— %.
BohnAluABl V2g 1 363% 363% 36yB + %
tBon Ami B 2V2 1° 56% 56% 56%+ %
Bond Stores 2 - 3 27 265% 26%+ %'
Bordn Co 1.20g 6 40% 40% 40% — %
Bore-Warner 2 . 2 42 41% 41%+ %
Bower Roll B 2 4 33% 33 33 + %
Bridgept B .05g 3 14% 143% 14*%+ %
Briggs Manufe 2 1 32 32 32 — %
Briggs A Stra 1 - 1 24% 24y. 243% -
Bristol-Mylg 81 40 40 40
Brown Sh 1.20a 2 26% 26% 26% + y»
Bucyrus-E »60g 11 16% 16% 16% + %
Budd Co 74 10% 10% 10% + %
Buffalo Frg .00g 1 26% 26% 26%
Buf Ng E Pf3.60 1 102% 102% 102%
Bullard Co . 2 17 16*% 17 + %.
BulovaWatrh 2a 2 29% 29% 29% — %’
Burling Mills 1 a 1 153% 153% 15%
Burr Ad M .60 4 12% 12% 12% + %
Bush Term 35g 5 7% 6% 7
♦BushTB pf334kl20 73 72 73 +1
Butler Bros Vug 5 13% 13% 13% + %
ButteC&Z 2 3% 33% 33%- %
tByers A M of 7 10 97 97 97
CAl. PACK 1 % - 1 27% 27% 27% + %
Callahan Zinc. . 6 2% 2 2
Calumet A H %g 5 7 6% 7
Can Dry G ,45g 24 155-4 15% 15% - %
Can Pacific 34g 20 10yB 10% 10% — %
Cannon Mills 4g 1 61 81 61 +1%
TCaro C & O 5 50 117% 117% 117%
CaroPw&Ltlg 1 33% 33% 33%
Carr&Gen 20a 1 6% 6% 6% + %
Case JI Co 1.20g 2 34% 34 34
Caterpillr Tr 3 3 523% 52% 52%
Celanpse Cp 52 21% 20% 20% — %
fCelanese of 7 30 141% 1411* 141% +1%.
Celanese 1st 43i 1 105% 1055% 105%
Celotex Ccrp i 3 22% 213% 213% —1
Cent Aguirre 1 % 5 18% 18% 18%+ %
CenHGAE -:Hg 6 9 9 9 + %
Cent R R N J • 1 5% 5% 5% - %
CenViol Su 2V*e 2 27% 27% 27% + *%
Cerro de Pas 2 48 31 30*% 30*%
Certain-td .30g 10 13*ib 13% 13% — 3%
tChsmo P pf4'2 40 104% 104'% 104% + %
ches 6c Ohio .3a 19 43 42% 42% — 3/4
ChicagoCorp V4g 12 7% 7% 7% — *%
Chi A .3 III A 1 73% 7% 7%
Chi Grt West pf 2 10J% 105% 10*%
Chi M SPA Pan 10 8% 7% 7% - %
CMSP&P Pf7%g 5 27% 26% 26% - 3*
Chi A N W pf ne 2 40% 40 40% + 3%
Chi Pneu Tool lg 2 24 ?4 24 + %;
Chi Yello Cab 1 1 13 13 13
Childs Co • - _ 3 5% 5% 5% — V»
cnryvjpj- . *4g awu-b ^ «
Cin G & E .70g 10 27*4 77 27 -*4
Cin Mill M 1.40 1 22V* 22*4 22*4
Cl T Finance 2 3 39** 39V* 39V* 4- **
City Ice&Fuel 2 1 28 28 28 - V*
Clark Equip 3nt 1 24*e 24*'§ 24V* — *4
CleveElecIllum2 19 384 38V* 38*4
tCler E 111 pf4 V? 20 110*4 110*4 110*4
Clev Graph 1.80 1 MV* 28*4 28*4 4- 34
ClimaxMol 1.20 19 19 18*4 18*.* — V*
Coca Cola 3a 5 155 153 155 4-3
tCoca-Cola A 3. 40 63V* 63V* 63V* 4- V*
Coleate-P-P 2a 2 40 39 39 -1*4
•Coig-P-P Pf34 10 103 103 103 4-1
Collins Ac Aik 1 a 1 31 31 31
Col Fu Ac Ir 60a 10 13*4 13 13 - *4;
tColo & South 60 10*4 10 10 — *.*
tColo&So I St pf 30 10*4 10*4 10*4— V*
Col&Sou 2nd pf 10 9 9 9 -1
Co 111 mb B B .1 ? 1 26 26 26
CoiGasAtElec 60 33 10*4 10V* 10*4 4- *4
Columbia Piet _ 4 15V* 15*4 15¥z — *4
Colum Carbn 2 1 31*4 31*4 31*4 4- *4
ColAcSOhE 1.4.*?€ 2 42 42 42 4-1
Cornel Credit 2 4 38*4 37** 38*4 4- V*
tComl Cr d?3 60 30 106V* 106V* 106V* 4- V*
Comrrl Solv Vj g 11 22*4 22** 22*4 - *4
CornwlthEd 1.40 14 29*4 28V* 29
Comwl * South 158 2V* 2*4 2**— *4
Com A: So pf Ok 1 116 116 116 — *4
Conde Nast 1 4 9*4 9*4 9*4
Congoleum-N la 5 26 25V* 25V* — l4
Cons Cigar 2 .. 1 32 32 32
Cons Cop log - 4 5*4 5*4 5*4
Cons Edls 1.60 13 25>/4 25*4 25*4 — *4
Cons Nat Gas 2 1 42*4 42*4 42*4 — *4
Cons R St 1.60a 6 14** 13*4 13*4- *4
ConsVultee'jg 5 12% 12% 12% - %
ConsumPowlg 2 34V* 34*4 34*4 — *4
♦ConsumP pf4Va 30 113 113 113
Container lg 6 36 35 36 — *4
Cont Baking 1_- 6 15 15 15
Cont Can i 7 37V* 36** 37 — *4
rnnt r> Fih l.-sr 1 10V* 10V* lOVii +■ *4
Cont Insurnc 2 4 *931 49*4 49*1 + 34
Cont Motors 13 7V4 7 7*4
Cont Oil Del 1g 10 4074 40*4 4074
Cont Steel '.-g 1 14*4 14*4 14*4+ *4
Cooper-Bess 2 147* 14*4 1474
CoDPrwldStl HO 3 1234 12*1 12*4
♦CornExch 2.80 10 54*4 5434 5434 + *4
Corn Prod 1 VaR 5 65*4 65 65 —1
Cornell-DE SO 2 13*4 13*4 13*4 - *4
CorningGlas* *4 7 26*4 26*4 26*4 + *4
♦Corn Gls pf8*2 30 104 104 104
♦CornGl nf n3»4 30 104*4 104*4 104*4 + 7% ‘
Coty Inc .2<*« 3 5 5 5
Crane Co , 60 3 30 29*4 40 +34
CrownCork .80? 1 36*4 36*4 36*4
CrowrCk S2pf2 1 40 48 48 + *4
CrownZe! I 80* 4 2731 27*4 2734+ *4
♦Crown Z PI4.20 30 102*4 102*4 102*4
♦ CrwnZelier pf4 40 112. 113*4 112 +1
tCuba R R Df 20 24 24 24 - *4
Cub-Am Sug 34* 7 16*1 16*4 16*1
Cudahy P 1 20a 3 37V* 37»i 37*4+ *4
Cudahy pf4*a 1 98V* 98*4 98»4-13wj
Cuneo Press '28 1 163* 16*1 163a — ,.4
Curtu Publish 11 7V* 7*4 7*4— *li
Curtis P prpf 8a 2 56*1 56 5631 + 3*!
Curt-VVright *-ae 11 4** 4*4 4! 4 + 141
Curt-WrightA 2 2 14*1 14 74 » + 34*
Cutler-Hm .60g 2 24V® 24 24 - 31
DANA CORP 1 2 24 24 24 - *4
uay Po&Lt OOg 8 31*4 31 31 — *4
♦ DayP&L pf 4*4 20 108*4 108*1 108*4
DaytonRub 60g 1 14 14 14
Dccca Pec 1 20 15*4 14*i 14*4 -1
Deere i Co V-g 9 35 34 35 4 14
Deere Pf 1 40 1 35*4 35*4 35*4- *4
Del Lack & Wn 3 6*4 6V, 6*4
Den ARGWct 5 93* 9*4 9*4 - Vfci
Det EdJS l 20b 15 237* 23*-e 233a
DetMichSto.SOa 5 11*4 11** 11*4
Dct St-1 Corp 1 a 3 20-, 20** 20**+ *4
Devoe&RAl 20a 1 2431 243* 2434
Dia Match 1*2a 1 3731 3731 3731 - *4
Dist CP-8ea 60 14 13** 13*4 13*4
Doehler-Jarvs 1 3 33*4 33*4 33V* + 34
Dome Mine ,77g 2 19*4 19 19
DouglasAlr 7Vje 2 51 51 51+34
Dow Chem 2*ak. 16 157*4 156*4 156*4 -1
Dresser Tndust 7 16*4 1634 1631 + *4
Du Pont de N 4g 7 17874 178*4 1783% + 7%
iDuPontpfl’a 1 127 127 127 + 14
I ♦Dun Light of f 70 115*4 114 115*4 +1*4 ,
EAGLE PIC 1.20 1 20V® 20** 2034-34
Eastern Alrl W 55 1931 19*4 1 9*4 + *4 J
: EstmanKod 1.40 7 4534 45** 45*4 -
Ekco Prod 1.20 5 167* 1631 1631 *
Sales——
Stock and Add Ket
Dividend Rate. 00 High. Low. 2:30. ehge
Elec Auto-Lite 3 3 53 . 52% 53 + %
Elec Boat 1 .5 12% 12 12 - % j
Elec Boat pf 2.. 1 38% 38% 38%+ %
El Power * Lt 20 13% 13% 13% - %
ElP&LS6pf4'ak 2 139% 137% 139%+2%
Elfin NatW.60a 3 18 18 18
El Paso KG 2.40 3 49% 48% 49%+1%
Emer Radiol 2 15% 15% 15% + %
Emp Dit El 1 12 1 15% 1*% 15% + %
tEnd-John pf 4 20 102% 102% 102%
Ena Pub Sve 65 28 27% 27% - %
fEne Pub S Pf 5 110 102 101% 101% - %
»Ena P 8 pf 6% 190 104 103% 103% - %
♦Ena Pub 8 of B 40 104% 104 104 - %
Eqult Office B • 3 3% 3 3 - %
Erie R R1 _ 7 8% 8% 8%
Erie RR of A 5.. 1 49 49 49
Eureka Will 2 8% 8% 8% + %
Evans Prod % , 2 20 20 20 - %
Fvershro 1.20a. 3 14% 14% 14% — %
Ex-Cell-O 2.60 _ 3 36 35% 36 + %
FAJARDO t.a . 6 29% 29% 29% - % j
FarnsTel&Rad 3 5% 5% 5% + %
FedMin&Sml *it 2 36% 36 36%+ %
Fed Mogul l%g 1 42 42 42 + %
Fed Mot Tr .40a 2 10% 10% 10% - %
Federat DSt 1 % 4 21 20% 20%
Fid P Fire In 2a 1 52% 52% 52% + %
Firest Tire 2a_„ 3 43 43 43 -%
Flintkote lag 22 27 26% 27 - %
Florence Stove 2 1 31 31 31 — %
Florida Pow 1 5 14% 14% 14% - %
Follansbee S Via 3 18% 18% 18% - %
Food Fair St 40 5 10 9% 9%
Freeport Sul2Va 1 39% 39% 39% - %
Pruehauf Tra 1 1 25% 25% 25% + %
iFruehauf T of4 20 96 96 96
GABRIEL 35g 1 9% 9% 9% + %
Gair Robert _ 5 6% 6% 6% + %
Gair R pf 1.20 .. 1 19% 19% 19%+ %
Gar Wood Ind.. 3 5% 5% 5% + %
Ga/iordCont 1 a 2 15% 15% 15%
GenAmlnvl 48e 7 11% 11% 11% — %
Gen Am Tr 2%. 1 51% 51% 51%-%
B.i-ina an 1 Irtli WVi. 1A1A 1 A.
Gen Cable 5 9% 9% 9%
tGenCable lof 4 60 72% 72% 72% + %
Gen Elec 1.BO.. 25 34% 34 34%-%
Gen Foods 2 . 6 J9 38% 39
Gen Mills l’ aa 4 49 49 49 + %
Gen Mills pf 3V. 1110 110 110
Gen Motor 1V2* 20 56 SS% 55% — %
Gen Mot of 5 2 127% 127% 127% - %
Gen Mot Pf 3%. 1 105% 105% 105% - %
Gen Out Advt 1. 1 14% 14% 14% — %
Gen Precis Eo 1 2 17% 17 17% + %
Gen P Util .40* 23 13 12% 13 - %
Gen Ry SI* %* 1 20% 20% 20% - %
Gen Rea! & Dtll 3 4% 4% 4%
Gen Refract %* 1 21 21 21 - %
Gen Shoe 2% 3 28% 28 28
Gen Teleoh 2 4 30% 30% 30% - %
GenTlmeln 1.60 2 23% 23 23% + %
Gen Tire&R la 4 22% 22% 22%+%
Gillette S R 2V, 14 25% 25 25 - %
Gtmbel Bros 2b 4 19% 19% 19% - %
Glldden Co 2 40* 1 37% 37% 37%+ %
OcebeIBrew.20a 1 5% 5% 5% + %
Goodall-San 1% 1 26% 26% 26%+ %
Goodrich B F 2* 10 50 49% 49% + %
Goodrich pf 6 1 103 103 103 - %
GoodyearT&R 4 13 42% 42 42 -1
Goodyear pf 5__ 1 106% 106% 106% + %
Graham-Pa!*e 13 3% 3% 3% + %
GranbyCon .30* 1 6 6 6
Granite CStl 5 16 16 16
Grant (WT) la 12 28 27% 27%
tGrantWTpf3\210 104 104 104 - %
Grayson-RobVi* 7 10% 10% 10% + %
Gt Nor 1 O ct 1 e 5 13% 13% 13%+%
Gt Nor Ry Pf 3 5 39% 38% 39
GtWstSu* 1,20a 2 22% 22% 22%+%
tGtWestSu* pf7 10 147 147 147 +1%
Green H L 3a 1 59 59 59 -1
Greyhd Corp 1* 13 28 27% 27%-%
tGreyhnd pf 4% 50 102% 101% 102% +1%
GrumAlrc En 2e 16 18% 18% 18*% - %
GuantanSu* V«* 5 6% 6% 6% + %
GulfMo&Oh wl 2 8 7% 8 - %
Gulf Mob&Ohlo 4 8% 8% 8% - %
Gulf Oil 1 a 12 64% 64% 64%
HAYES INDUS. 1 6% 6% 6% + %
Hecht Co l.BOa 1 25% 25% 25% +1
Hercules P .70* x 1 57 57 57 + %
Hershey Choc 3. 1 77% 77% 77%+ %
Hinde & Dau 2.. 4 26% 26% 26%-%
Holly 8u* 1 . 4 18 17% 18 + %
Homestake M 1* 5 44 43% 44
Houd-Hersh '«* 5 14% 14% 14%+ %
Houd Her pf2V«. 1 47% 47% 47%+ %
Hshold Fin 1.80 1 31 31 31
• Housenja 013*74 eu 99% 99** 99%
Houston L&P 2 . 4 42% 42% 42% + %,
Houstoir'Oil Vs* 19 22% 21% 21’* - %.
HowardStrs 1%. 2 21 21 21
Howe Sound 2 . 3 34% 34% 34% - VW
HudsonBayl Va* 1 37% 37% 37% - v£
Hudson Mot .40 13 14% 13% 14% - %
Hunt Poods_ 5 16 15% 16 + %
Hudd Coro 8 4% 4% 4%
IDAHO PW 1.80 2 35% 35 35 -1
111 Central 10 20% 20% 20% - %
IndplsP&Ll 40a 3 25% 25% 25%
Ind Rayon l%g. 1 37 37 37 - %
Inger-Rand 8 1 107 107 107
Inland Stl .90* 3 35% 35 35
Interchm Co 1 * 1 39% 39% 39%
InterconRub V4g 1 3% 33/# 33*
Int Harvester 4. 2 81 80% 80% — %
Int Hydro El A_ 7 7% 7% 7%
Int Nickel I 60_ 13 30% 30 30% - %
int Paper 3 _ 14 42% 42% 42% - %
Int Ry Cen Am _ 1 11 11 11 + %
Int Shoe 2.40 _ 5 383* 301^ 38%+ %
Int Tel* Tel 17 11% 10% 10% - %
Inter Dep Strs 2 1 20% 20% 20% + %
Island Crk C 3.4* 2 38% 38% 38%-1
JACOBS PL 5 6% 6% 6% - %
MerCnt.P&L Df4 10 100% 100% 100%
John Manv nV4g 7 37** 37% 37% + %
Johns-M pf3Va 2 113% 112 112 +1**
Johnson & John 1 28% 28% 28% + %
Jones & L Stl 2 . 8 29% 28% 29% - %
Toy Manf 1.20a 2 30% 30% 30% - %
>KCP*Lt pf3.80290 107% 107% 107%+ %
Kan City South 4 18% 18 1,8 — %
Kan Citv So Pf4 1 50 50 50 - >4 j
KelseyWnl B 2 17% 17’* 17% + 3*
Kepnecott l*/4g 11 42% 42% 42% - %
Kimbrly Cl 1.40 2 23 2,2% 23
fKimb-Clrk pf 4 70 106*4 106 106 - %
Koppers Co 1.60 4 26% 26% 26%
'Koppers pf 4_ 10 98% 98*4 98%
Kresge S S 1* 1 34** 343* 34**+ %
Kroger Co 2.40. 3 43% 43% 43%
LACLEDE .Jog 2 5 5 5
La Cons pf .43*. 1 12% 12% 12%+ 3*
Lambert Co 2a 2 29% 29 29% + %
Lehich C&N 1 13 9% 9*4 9% + %
LehPortCem 1 % 7 30% 30% 30%-1
Leh Valley Coal 1 2 2 2 + %,
.eh V Coa)2pf% 1 5% 5% 5%
.ehman Cp ,60g 1 42% 42% 42% + %
.erner Strs 1 1 20 20 20
.Ibbv Glass 2 . 1 50% 50% 50% - 3*
Jb McN&L *;* 6 8% 8% 8%
,iggett&Myer3a 1 82% 82% 82% - %
Ligg & M pf 7 _ 40 185 185 185 - %
.inK-Belt 2a __ 1 54% 54% 54%+ %
ion Oil 2 . 5 473* 47% 47% - %
.ockheed Aire _ 7 113* 11% 11% - %
.oew’* Inc 1 % 8 21% 21% 21% - %
.one StarC 3%a* 1 62** 62** 62%+ %
.ong-Bell L.45k 2 14% 14% 14% + %
-.orruara rroa i / 10*41 19
Lorillard pf 7 .. 20 167 166% 166% -1
jOU G&E A 1 % 2 26 26 26 + % !
^ouisvil&N 3.62 2 42 42 42 - %
M'ANDAfcF 1.65c 2 35 34% 34% - %
Mack Truck 2b 3 50 50 50 4- %
Mac* <RH 1 1 60 4 32% 32% 32% - %
Magma Cop %g 2 17% 17% 17% - %
Macnavox 1 3 13% 13% 13% — %
Manati Sug %* 6 9% 9 9% 4- %
Marathon Cm 1 8 20% 70 20% - %
Marine Midi %g 1 7% 7% 7%
Marshll Pld 2a 13 26 25% 25% - %
Martin Q L 3 15% 15% 15% - H
Martin-Parr.60 2 16% 16% 16% 4- %
Masonite Coro 1 3 46% 46% 46% 4- %
Math Alkali *«g 2 26% 25% 25%
May Dept Strs 3 4 43 42% 42% 4- %
May Dept pf3*/« 20 102% 102% 102% 4- %
Maytag Co V«e .4 8 8 8 4- %
McCall Corp 3a 2 38% 38% 38% 4- %
McGraw Elec 2a 1 38% 38% 38% - %
McKess&R 2 40 8 31 30% 30%-%
Mead Corp 70* 1 18% 18% 18% 4- %
fMead Cd pf 4*4 20 93 93 93 4-1
Melville Sh 1.00 4 21% 21% 21% - %
Mengel Co la 3 17 17 17 4- %
Merck ArC 1.40 1 47% a7% 47%-%
MerckArCo pf.3% 1 100 3 00 100 4- %
Met Ed pf .3 PO 30 108 108 108 - %
Miami Cod %g 1 13% 13% 13% - %
Mid-ConPetl V4* 6 37% 37% 37% 4- %
Minn-HonRegl g 2 50% 50 50% 4- %
rMinn H of 3.20 30 103% 103% 103% -1%
Mlnn-Moline 18 8 8
Min Mg&M 1 40 2 57 57 57 4- %
Mission Crp 34g 1 34% 34% 34% - %
Mo-Kan-Texas 3 4 4 4
Mo-Kan-Tex pf 1 13% 13% 13% - %
Monsanto Ch 2 6 58% 57% 58% - %
Monta Ward 2a 16 53% 53V. 53% - %
Moore-McC L 2 8 25% 25% 25% 4- %
Motorola .80 8 10% 10% 10% 4- %
Mueller B ,60g 1 19% 19% 19%
VfurphyOC 1 %• 6 36% 36% 36% 4- %
MurrayCorp lag 1 11% 11% 11%
sr.'-ers irttsn. v // / / ti
NASH-KELV ’/be 12 15 147* 147* - >4 j
tNash Chat&stL 20 22 2174 217* - 74
Nat Acme 2_ 1 2474 247* 24* - 7* !
Nat Airlines- 3 12 1174 1174 — 7* j
NatAuto Fib 60 1 10 10 10
Nat ATlatl ,.7Se 1 12* 12* 12* - >4
Nat Blse 1.16a 6 2S>4 27* 27* - 7*
Nat BdSSb 60a 2 22* 22* 22*
Nat Can 1 87* 87* 874- *
NatCashRe 1 7«« 6 39* 387* 3874 - 7*
Nat City Lines \ 1 97* 9* 974 - *
Nat Container 3 7 37*4 367* J6* + 7*
Nat Cyln Gas 80 1 147* 147* 1474 + *
Nat Dairy 1.80 5 30 297* 297* + *
Nat Distillers 2 17 19* 19 1974 - *
Nat Gypsma 6 17 167* 167*— 74
rNat Gyp pf 4 7* 10 10374 103* 10374- *
Nat MSS C.30* 2 1874 1874 1874 - 7*
Nat Pew SL .. 25 174 1* 1*
Nat! Steel * 2 77* 77* 77* + * j
Nat Supply 15 157* 1574 1574 — *
Nat Sup S2 pf 2 8 17 167* 167* - 74 \
Nat Tea la 4 22 22 22
Nat Vul Fibr 80 * 15* 15* 15*
Natomas Co '2* 4 12* 127* 12V*
/Newberry Df.3»4 *0 1037* 1037* 103*
Newmont Mia 2 37* 37* 377*
»NewptIndpf4'« 10 99* 997* 99*
Newpt N ship IS s 17* 177* 17* - *
NY Air Brake 2 1 35 35 35 + 7*
N Y Central RR 29 13* 13 13*+*
NYC Omnlb 'it * 1? 17 12 + 7*
N Y Dor* 1 217* 2D* 21* + 74
rNY S Harlem 5 20 260 255 260 + 10
♦NYSE&G Pf.3’« 30 97* 977* 97* - *
»Nor S Wat 10a 50 227 225 225 -2
No Am Avia le 2 7* 7 7 — *‘
Nor Am Co Ub 33 24* 24* 245+
North Paciflc la 4 15* 1574.137*-*
NorthwatAir *e 9 13 12* 13
Northwst Airl nf 7 23* 2374 23* - ‘4
'Northw Tel 3 160 35* 34* 34*-1
Norw Phar ,60_. 1 1374 137* 13*— * j
OHIO OIL Via _ 20 23* 22* 2374+ *j
Oliver Corn *e 4 18* 18* 18* — * j
Omnibus Corp 1 2 8* 874 87* + *!
Oppenheim C 2 1 20 20 20
TPC COAST lpf 10 61 61 61
Pac Gaa S Flc 2 16 35* 34* 35*4 + Vi
Pac G S E rt . 253 1 ** 1 +*,
Pac Uahtina 3. 1 36* 36* 56*1 + *
Pac Mills 3_ 4 29* 29* 2974}
Sales
Stock and Add . „ „
Dividend Rate. 00. Hl*h- Lo*. 2:30. rb*e.
tPte TAT 1.65S 350 101 99 100 +3%
Pac Tin Con» .. 1 *% +H +% + %
Pae West Oil He 1 34% 34% 34% - %
PackardM 15*. *8 5% 5% 5% - %
PnAmAlrwyitie 18 10% 10% 10% — %
Pan Am Pet \ ■ 1 13 13 13 — %
PanhdlBPL 1 %* 3 44% 44% 44%
Panhandle PAR 3 6% 6% 6%- %
Paramnt Plot St. 35 *5% *5% 25%
Park Utah CM 3 2% 2% 2%
Parke Davisl 60 « 36% 36% 36% +1
Parker Rust 2% 1 2» 29 29
ParroeleeTrl 20 1 8% 8% 8% - %
PenAPord 40a 1 35 35 35 + %
Penney |JC> 2a 13 41% 40% 41%+1
Penn-Cent Alrl. 10 8% 8 8 — %
Penn PAL 90s. 10 19% 19% 19% - %
Penn R R %tr _ 23 18% 18% 18% - %
Penn Salt .90s 1 43% 43% 43% + %
Peoples Dr 1.60 1 47% 47% 47%+ %
PeoplesGLAC4a 1 81% 81% 81%
Pepsi-Cola 70a 25 29% 28% 29 -Ml
Pere Marquet pf 4 93% 93% 93%
PereM prpf2’4k 1110 110 110
Petrol Corp .20* 6 9% 9% 9% + %
Ptelfter Brew 1 - 1 13% 13% 13% - %
Pflaer CACo 2a 5 43% 42% 42%-1
PhelpsDsel.60* 7 37 36% 36% - %
tPhlla Co 6 pf 3 160 53% 33% 53%+ %
Phila Elect 1.20 8 23% 23% 23% + %
Phil Elec pf3 80. 1 108 108 108
PhilARCAIl*. 1 11% 11% 11% - %
Philco Corp 1 % 1 24 24 24 -%
Philip Morl%a 8 29% 29% 29%-%
Phillips Petrol 2 5 54% 54% 54%
Pillsbury 1.60a. 2 34% 34% 34%
PittCkACh %e 6 11 11 11
tPlttsCACpfS 30 9* 98 98
PitConCoal 1 40 2 19% 19% 19%
tPtttFtWynepf7 20 171% 171% 171% + %
PittPIateOl .45* 6 33% 32% 32% - %
PlttScrAB 16*. 2 7% 7% 7% - %
Pftt Steel 2 9% 9 9 - %
tPitStl prpf2sik 50 72% 72% 72%+ %
Pittston Co _ 5 19% 18% 19% + %
Pressed Stl Car. 3 10% 10 10
PressStl C pf2V« 1 37 37 37 -1
Proctor A O 2a 5 60 59% 59% + %
Pub SvcCol 1 65 « 1 33% 33% 33%
Pub S N J 1 .40 8 24% 23% 24
tPub SvcNJ pf8 230 140% 1*0 1*0 - %
tPub 8vcNJ pf7 190 124% 1241+ 134% + %
•Pub SvcNJ pfC 80 114% 113% 113% -1
• Pub 8vc NJ pit, 240 106% 105% 106%
Publtcker Ind_ 5 16% 17% 17% — %
Pullman 1c_ 24 56% 56!+ 56%+ %
Pure Oil 1 18 24% 23% 23% - %
RADIO CP 20* 13 7% 7% 7% - %
Radio Cppf3%. 1 74 74 74 - %
Ra-Kth-O 1 20 7 11% 11% 11%
Raybest-M IH*. 2 31% 31 31 - %
Rayonier pf 2 2 33% 35% 35% — %
Reading 1 pf 2 _. 1 *4% 44% 44%+%
Reeves Bros 1 . 1 11% 11% 11%-%
Reliance Mfg 1 a 1 12 12 12
•Reliance pf 3% 10 74 74 74
RemRand 1 05b 10 29% 28% 29%
Reo Motors 2%. 1 28% 28% 28%-%
Rep Aviation 2 4% 4% 4% — %
Republic Picture 15 5 5
Repub Steel la 1* 24% 24% 24% - %
RevCABrass 3 17% 17 17 - %
Rexall Drug V«g. 10 8 7% 7%
Reynolds Met . 3 ■ 19% 19% 19% — %
Reynolds Soring 1 10% 10% 10% — %
tRynlds T l.*0a 10 45% 45% 45% - %
ReynTobB 1 40a 6 40 39% 39%
Rheem Mfg 1 _. 1 20% 20% 20% - %
Richfield 011 1.. 1, 14% 14% 1*%+ %
Roan Ant .22* 1 7% 7% 7% >
Royal Tyne .66* 3 21% 21 21 - %
SAFEWAY ST 1 6 22% 22% 22%
•Safeway of 5 110 112% 112% 112% - %
St Joseph Ld 2a 18 41% 40 40 -1%
St L San Fran 16 6% 6% 6% — %
St L SanFran Df 1* 21% 20% 20% - %
Savage Arms %. 18 8 8
Scbenley Distl * 23 26% 26% 26%-%J
tScovill Df 3.65 100 100% 100% 100% + %
Seab Air L R R 12 14% 14% 14%
Sears Roebck la 36 34 33% 34 + %
Seeger Aefrgatr 2 11% 11% 11%+ %
SeiberlingRnb 1. 3 9% 9% 9% — %
Servel Inc 30e_ 8 11% 11% 11%+%
tServel pf 4%__ 20 108% 108% 108%
Shamrock .80 6 23% 23 23
Sharon Steel 2. 2 28% 28% 28%
ShrpADohme 1 2 21% 20% 20% - %
SheafferPen.40a 2 15 15 15 + %
Shell D 011 1 Vie 11 27% 27% 27%-%
Sheraton ,20g 8 7 6% 6% — %
Silver King Col 1 * * *
Simmons Co Vig 2 30% 30% 30% — %
Sinclair Oil l._. 22 14% 14% 14% - %
Skeliy Oil 2e 2 71 71 71
Smith (AO) CD 1 1 41% 41% 41%+2
BmithACoron 2. 6 26 25% 26 + %<
Smith&Sonl 40 3 31% 31 31 - %
Socony-Vac .80 47 15% 15% 15%
n.n 1 _ A A*/rn. A*,- _L IX ’
SCE&Gpf2Vi 1 52% 52% 52%
Bo P RicaSug 4a 5 44% 4J% 44% +1 i
3o CalEdis IV*.. J 31% 31% 31%-%
Sou Nat Gs 1%. 4 26% 26% 26% - %
Southern Pac 4. 20 37% 37 37 — %
Southern Ry 3 10 31 30% 30% - %
Sperry Cp lVae. 1 17% 17% 17%-%
Spiegel Inc ... 6 10 9% 9% - %
1 Spiegel pf 4% lo 78 78 78
SouarrDCo 40g 4 14% 14% 14% - %
Std Gs&El S4 PI 23 21% 20% 21 - %
Std G&ES7pr pf 1 101% 101% 101%
Std Oil Cal 3.40 23 56% 56% 56% - %
Std Oil Ind lVia 23 40% 40% 40%+ %
Std Oil N J 2g 30 73% 73% 73% + %
Std Oil OhioViE 5 27 26% 26%-%
Sterchi Bros 1.11) 13 13
sterling Drug 2. 1 38% 38% 38%-%'
SterlneD pf 3’i. 1 103% 103% 103% -1
3tokley-VC pf 1. 1 19% 19% 19%+ %
Itone&Web )’/.<• 3 12% 12 12% - %
Studebaker V«f_ 9 17% 17% 17% - %
Sun Chem 60.. 2 11% 11% 11%
3un Oil 1 b ... 1 57 57 57 +1%
Sunray Oil V«* . 2 9% 9% 9%
3unshine Bisc 3. 1 34% 34% 34%
Superheater la. 1 18% 18% 18% — %
sup Oil Cal Vie . 1112 112 112 +3
Superior Stl ’-it. 1 15 15 15 - %
Sweets Co ,8.Vg .. 1 17% 17% 17% — %
Swift&Co 1.00a 7 30% 30% 30% - %
Swift Inti 1.60 3 24% 24% 24% - %
Sylvan El P 70g 1 22% 22% 22% + %
tSvlvn Elec of 4 10 98 98 98
Symtne-Gld V«B 1 6% 6% 6%
rENN CORP la x 2 14% 14% 14% + %
rexas Co 2a 19 61% 61 61
rexGulfPr 20g. 6 12% 12% 12% - %
rex Gulf Sui 2a. 4 49% 49 49%
rex Pac C&O 1. 5 29% 29% 29% + %
rexPacLTr .40g 69 23% 22 23% +1%
fThteber pI2.40 20 54% 54 54 -1
rhird Ave Tram 2 7% 7% 7% + %:
rnotrosonPr V»f 1 39 39 39 — Vi
ride Wat Oil 1 a 7 19% 19 19 - %1
'TldeWat of3% 60 105% 105% 105% + %
rim-Det AxleVaC 5 16% 16% 16%-%:
rimken Roll lx 1 43% 43% 43%
rmsamerlca Via 2 11% 11% 11%+ %,
rransue & W 1 . 10 14% 14% 14% - %
rri-Cnt Co .30e 5 6 5% 6
20th C-Pox 3a . 21 28% 28% 28% - %,
20thC-PxpflVa. 1 36% 36% 36%
Tw C Rap Tie. 7 8% 8% 8%
UDYLITE 1 5 13 13 13 !
cin »> o * -w# -we t /p ,
Union Bag 2a 4 29* 28* 28* + * j
UnCarbide 2%g 9 100* 100* 100* - *
Union Oil Cal 1. 13 20* 20* 20*
Union Pacific P. 5 130* 128* 128* -1* |
Utd Air Lin *e. 10 22* 21* 22 + *|
Utd Aircraft 1 8 18* 18* 18*- *
Unit Carbon 2 _ 5 28* 28* 28*
Unit Cigar Whal 3 4* 4* 4*
tUtdCig-WpI3* 10 56* 56* 56* -1*
Utd Corn ... 8 2* 2* 2*
Unit Coro of 3 . 6 50* 50* 50* - * |
Utd Ene&Fdy 2 1 36* 36* 36*-*
United Fruit 2a 20 48 47* 47* + *
Unit G I ,05g 5 20* 20* 20* - *!
Unit MAM la 16 13* 13* 13*
tutd M&M pf 5 10 107* 107* 107* - *
Utd Paperbd lg 2 14* 14* 14* - *
U8AFSecl.30e 4 17* 17* 17*
tUS&FrSpf4* 10 103 103 103
U S Freight *g. 1 15* 15* 15*+ *
US Indus Ch la. 1 44* 44* 44* + *
US Leather_ 1 6* 6* 6* + *
US Lines 2 .. 6 19* 19* 19*- *
U S Plywood .80 2 26* 26* 26*
US Rubber 3g . 7 41* 41 41*+ *:
U8 S R&M lVig 1 40 40 40
US steel 4 . . 27 65* 64* 64*-*
US Steel of 7 . 1 142* 142* 142* + *
U 8 Tobac 1.20_ 2 19* 19* 19*
Utd Stores of« 1 105 105 105
UtStrs2d pf.3fte 2 8* 8* 8*
Unlv Lab 1 4* 4* 4* + * j
*UnivLeafTob4al50 84* 82 84* +2*
Unlv Pictures 2. 1 20* 20* 20*-*
VERT-C SUG 2 1 15 15 15 + *
Vic Chm W ,80g 2 40* 40* 40* + *
tVictorCh pf3Va 20 104* 1041* 104* + *
V» CaroIlnChem 2 5* 5* 5* - *
Va Railway 2* 1 37* 37* 37* + *
ViskingCrp 1.80 4 32* 32* 32*
WALWORTH *e 3 8* 8* 8*
Warner Brol* 35 15* 15* 15*— *
Warren Pet .80. 1 35* 35* 35*- *
Wash GasLt 1 * 1 23* 23* 23*
Wayne Pump 2 1 31* 31* 31*+ *1
West Ind Sug la 11 27* 26* 26* - * I
'W PenPw ol4* 50 115 115 115 - * '
WVH ruip«r- It < JO‘/3 JO‘ « jdvit w
tWVaP&P pf4% 50 110% 110% 110% -1 !
Western Atr Lin 5 6 6 6
WestAutoSup 3 5 43% 42% 43%+ %
West On Tel A 3 19’% 19% 19% - %!
Wstna Vr Br la 2 30% 30 30%
Westing Elec 1 32 26% 26% 26%-%
►WstlngEl Df3% 4 100 100 100
WstngElnfB-l 80 3 105% 105’+ 105% - %
Westvaco 1.40 1 27 27 27 - %
* WestvaC pf3^4 10 lOO 100 100
Wheel 8tll%« 1 35 35 35
White Motor la 2 21% 21% 21% - %
Willys-Overland 9 8% 8% 8% - %
Wtlson&Co ,45g 7 12 11% 11%+%
Wilson Pf 4 V« 2 97% 96% 97%+%
woolworth 2a 11 48'-. 47% 48% + %
rWPMcvprpf4% 50 85 84 84 -1%
Wyand Wor 40a 1 8% 8% 8%
VALE * T 60a 1 34% 34% 34% - % :
STORK CP 30 3 11% 11% 11%-%:
STounaSpr&W 1. 6 16% 16% 16%
'x'ungSheet&T 4 4 57% 57 57 - %
toniteProd ,45e 5 6% 6% 6% + %
Hourly Sale* an Use Exchanse Today:
11:00 a.m.. 120 000 12:00 noon 220 000:
1:00 p.m. 310 000 2:uOom. 390 000
tUnit of trading. 10 shares. *In bank
ruptcy or receivership, or being reorganised
jnder the Bankruptcy Act. or securities i
issumed by such companies. Rates of>
dividends in the foregoing table are annual
disbursements based on the last Quarterly
>r semiannual declaration Unless other
vise noted, special or extra dividends are
sot included, x Ex dividend xr Ex rights,
i Also extra or extras, b Plus stock divi
dend. d Cash or stock, e Paid last year.
I Payable In stock, g Declared or paid so
tar this year, h Payable in Canadian
funds, k Accumulated dividends paid or
declared this year __
Association of National Advertisers
appointed Robert M. Gray chairman
of its outdoor advertising commit
tee. He is manager of the adver-,
tising and sales promotion depart- j
ment of Standard Oil Co. (New
Jersey).
Ball Brothers Co. appointedf Ken
leth C. Frazier sales manager for;I
ts Eastern division. i
Slock Market Uneven;
Many Pivotals Stay
On Losing Side
ty th* Associated Press
NEW YORK, June A number
of favorites failed to hold early ad
vances in today’s stock market while
many ptvitols stayed on the losing
side.
Dealings held to the slow pace of
recent sessions as selling pressure
never assumed urgent proportions..
An assortment of railroad issues
dipped after early improvement, j
near the fourth hour gains and losses
were widely distributed.
Commission houses reported cau
tious reluctance by customers to
make commitments in the face of
coal shutdowns, threatened labor
stoppages, disturbances abroad and
uncertainty over presidential action
on tax and labor legislation. Some
bidding was attributed to belief a
near-term recovery was likely.
Declines were registered by United
States Steel, American Telephone,
Chrysler, General Motors, Goodyear.
Kennecott, Anaconda. International
Nickel, Pennsylvania Railroad,
Southern Railway, Oliver Corp.. Boe
ing, Philip Morris, Westinghouse
Electric and Electric Power & Light.
Resistant were Santa Fe, Texas Co..
South Porto Rico Sugar, Goodrich,
American Can, Du Pont and J. C.
Penney.
Bonds were narrow.
Northeast Airlines Reports
$43,946 Operating Loss
By lh» Assoc rated Press
NEW YORK. June 9 —Northeast
Airlines, Inc., today reported 1946
operating loss of $43,946. The report
said, however, that, with credits of
$234,653 applicable to prior years,
the profit carried to the deficit from \
the operations account for the year1
was $190,707.
The prior years' credits consisted
of $103,878 increased airmail reve- j
nue for 1945 under a rate adjust-1
ment ordered March 18, 1947, and
$110,775 representing the unrequired ,
portion of reserves provided in prior j
years against revenues under the1
Army Air Forces operational con-1
tracts, as well as $20,000 unrequired I
reserve for prior years’ taxation
contingencies.
The balance sheet as of December
31, 1946, showed a deficit in earned
surplus of $106,207, compared with
5296,914 on December 31, 1945.
There are 500,000 shares of common
stock outstanding.
Washington Exchange
SALES.
Woodward 4 Lothrop common— 5 at 49.
Garflnckel common new—80 at 18.
BONDS
PUBLIC UnLITHM
_ . _ Bid Aikad
Am T & T cv db ,1s 1956. 121%
Am T A T cv db 2*.a 1961 113V* 114V.
Cap Transit 1st ref 4s 1964 105 108V.
City & Suburban 5s 1948 105
Georgetown Oas 1st 5s 1961 125% _I
Pot Elec Pow 3V.s 1966_105
Pot Elec Pow 3!'.s 1977 110
Washington Gas 5s 1960 128 _
MISCELLANEOUS.
rer RfAW Cp 1st 4V.s 1948 101% 102%
STOCKS.
PUBLIC UTILITY.
Amer Tel A Tel (9) _ J81V. _
Capital Transit (2.00)_ 24% 26%
N A W 8teamboat < +41_ 150 185
Pot Eiec Pwr pfd <8)__ 100%
Pot Pwr 6%% pfd (5.501.. 107 110
Wash Gas Lt com (1.501 . 23V. 24
Wash Gas Lt cum pfd (4.25) 105% 107
Wash G Lt cum cv pf (4.50) 107
Wash Ry A El com <al8.00) 560
Wash Ry A El pfd (5) 117 120
BANK AND TRUST COMPANIES
Amer Sec & Tr Co (10) 290 320
Bank of Bethesda (tl.OO). 46
Capital (.80) _ _ _ 31 _
Com A Savings new (10)_ 362% 400
Liberty (81_300
Lincoln (t5) _ __310 _
National Sav A Tr (8.00) 380 _
Prince Georges B A Tr <tl) 25%
Higgs (12) ... _ 300 825
Union Trust Co (new)_ 40
Washington (6) ._ 16(1 190
Wash Loan A Tr (12) . 300 365
FIRE AND TITLE INSURANCE.
American (t6) __ 150 _
Columbia ( + .30) _ 12% __
firemen's (1.40) 32 _
National Union (.76)_ 14 _
Real Estate (t6) 185 _
MISCELLANEOUS.
Carpet Corp (2.001 ”42
Garflnckel eom new <1.50). 17% 18%
Garfl 5%% cu cv pf (1.375) 25
Garfi 4*4% cu cv pf (1.125) 21 22%
Hecht Co (1.601. 24 V. 25*-«
Hecht 3V.% cum pfd (3.75) 100% 102
Lanston Mono (1.00) _ 16V, 17%l
Mergenthaier Lino (a 75) . ”44 48%
Nat l Mtge A Inv pf (p.40> ”6%
Peoples Dr Strs com (+1.60) ”47 50
Security Storage (t5> _108 115
Ter Ref A Wh Cbrp (3) .46 ...
Wdwd A Loth com ( + 2 00). 47 50
Wdwd A Loth pfd (7)_ 127
•Ex dividends. tPlus extra or extras,
a Paid so far this year, p Paid 1946.
Chicago Grain
CHICAGO. June ft <£*>.—Hedging pres
sure against wheat increased on the
Board of Trade today and prices fell
back several cents without showing much:
rallying power. Clear weather in the1
Southwest and expectations of a rapid
increase in harvesting caused the selling.
Corn and oats declined with wheat and
there was some selling on more favorable:
irowing weather in the Midwest. Cash
corn was in less urgent demand than last
week and prices eased. However, book-1
ings of corn from the country remained
light at 77.000 bushels
Wheat closed 1 T/»-2%. lower: July. 2.21-1
2.21%; corn was 2 cents lower to %j
higher; July. 1.87%-%. and oats were
% to 1 cent lower; July. 96%-%.
Chicago Caah Market.
Wheat. No. 2 hard. 2.44%. Corn. No.
1 yellow 2.06%: No. 2. 2.05-2.07: No. 3.
2.03-2.05%; No. 4. 1.95-2.01: No. 5.
1.90%-1.98: sample grade. 1.10%-l,98;
No 3 white, 2.06. Oats. No. I mixed.
1.07: No. 1 heavy, white. 1.10: No. 1
while. 1.06-1.08%: No. 2 white. 1.07.
Barley, malting. 1.60-2.07. nominal: feed.
1.30-1.68. nominal; choice malting. 2.07
2.12.nominal.
Washington Produce
From the Department of Agriculture
EGGS—Market about steady. Receipts
moderate. Demand fair. Prices paid
l.o.b. Washington for Federal-State traded
■gts received from grading stations, June
a. 1847. Whites, browrs and mixed,
colors: IT. S. Grade A, extra large. 64:
large. 61-52; average. 51Vi: medium. 4ft
47: average. 40 V U S. grade B. large.
44. U. S. Grade C. 36. Current receipts.
37-40. mostly 40
LIVE POULTRY — Market Arm. Re
ceipts very light. Trading quiet. Prices
oaid f.o.b. Washington: Nominally un
changed. Fowl: Heavy type. 28-30;
light type. 22: brotler*. fryers and roast-;
ers. 33-34
DRE88ED POULTRY — Market Arm. !
Supplies light. Demand good Prices'
paid f.o.b Washington: Nominally un- j
changed: Fowl: 6 pounds and up. 37: 4 1
pounds. 35. Roasters: 4Va pounds and ‘
up, 44-47: 4 pounds. 40-41. Fryers:!
2 Va - 3 pounds. 30-30 Va.
New York Cotton
NFW YORK. June 9 i4V—Cotton futures
sere firm today. dominated by heavy even
ng-iip operations In the July. 1947. de
ivery. anticipating first notice day June 24
One leading spot firm was estimated
n have sold around 29,000 bales of the
tulv delivery, part of which was replaced
vith purchases of October position. Mills
cere fair buyers of nearby months against1
extile sales.
Gains in the new crop deliveries were!
imited. reflecting favorable private crop1
eoorts and news that India has tempo
erlly lifted ail restrictions on cotton ex*
torts until August 3!.
Late afternoon price* were unchanged
r> 90 rents a bale higher than the pre
'ious Close July. 35.45: October. 30.44.
ind December, 29 42
Dividends Announced
NEW YORK. June 9. t.4*i—Dividends i
ieclared:
Pe- Stk. of Pay
Rate. riod record, able, i
Increased. /
Shamrock Oil * Gas 30c Q 9-1* 7-1
Irregular.
Sdemphls Nat Gas 10c . _ 9-17 9-27!
Bern la r
Plliort Co pf ..92>/iC Q 9-19 7-1
Phils
Dairy Prod 1 of 1.12'* Q 9-20 7-1 >
Phila
Dairy Prod 2 of . 1 00 Q 9-20 7-1
Reeves Ely Lab pf 15c 8 9-24 7-1
3mtth A. O 25c 7-3 3-1
Visible Grain Supply
CHICAGO. June 9 ‘/Pi.—Visible supply
tf wheat decreased 1.344,000 bushels this
geek to 13.155.000 bushels, the Board of
rrade reported today. Corn decreased
195.000 to 12.905.000 bushels, oats de
pressed 297,000 to 3.896.000. rye de
ceased 166.000 to 706.000 and barley i
lecreased 3S3.0O0 to 6.949.000
Northwest AirUnes will operate ;
,hree eastbound and three west- 1
xiund flights to Tokyo. Shanghai 1
ind Manilla, starting July 15.
Judge Igoe Reversed
By Court of Appeals
In Rock Island Case
By Hm Associated Fross
CHICAGO, June 9.—The United
States Circuit Court of Appeals
today ordered Federal Judge Mich
ael I. Igoe to reverse an order in
which he appointed the majority of
the reorganization managers of the
Rock Island Railroad.
The Court of Appeals said that
Judge Igoe had revoked a part
of the reorganization plan pre
viously approved by the Interstate
Commerce Commission and the
Court of Appeals and appointed
three of the managers when the
plan gave him power to appoint
only one. •
In today’s decision the court said
that the appointive powers were
"an integral part of the plan” and
that "in such a situation the court
(Judge Igoei has no right to sub
stitute a means of execution of its
own, contrary to and in derogation
of the provision of the plan.”
A group of bondholders had al
leged that Judge Igoe had changed
the reorganization plan in viola
tion of the Court of Appeals man
date and had given himself the
power to name a majority of the
Board of Managers. *
Counsel for Judge Igoe told the
Court of Appeals that the jurist
considered nomination of a “com
bination of bankers” to the Board
of Managers was “not in the public
interest.”
Last Friday Judge Igoe’s fellow
District Court justices ordered him
to continue his jurisdiction of the
controversial 14-year-old railroad
bankruptcy case. They refused to
grant his request to be relieved.
Judge Evan A. Evans, senior
justice of the Court of Appeals,
will hear a petition by bondholders’
representatives Wednesday to re
move Judge Igoe from the case.
The Court of Appeals, in its
writ of mandamus today, specific
ally ordered expunging from the
confirmation order the three rights
of nomination which Judge Igoe
assigned to himself.
N. Y. Bond Market
(F.rnUbed the AeseeUtcd Press.)
SELECTED LIST OP ISSUES.
FOREIGN^ 2.30 Leh CAN 3Vas70 96%
Australia os 55.107 Leh VI HT 6s 54 5#’*
-anada 4s 80 .. 106 Leh Vai 4s 2003 33
Chile BsSepttila 23% LorrilladB »s 51 113%
Colombia 3s 70. 32% Mich CG 3%s6H no%
Denmlc 6 Vis 66 97% m-K-T ad] 6s67 51%
lugoslvBk 7s 67 9 M-K-T 1st 4s90 75%
Norway 4 Vis 68 100% Mo p»c 8 Vi a 49 17%
DOMESTIC 2:30 Mo Pac 6s 77 F. 66
AmdtF P 6*2030106% Mo Pac 6s 78 G 65%
Am T*T2%s 61 113% Mo Pac gn 4s 75 22%
Am TAT 2%s82 100% MorlsAE 4Vis55 61
A T 8 P 4s 95 ._ 128 Mt 8t.TAT2V,s8«100%
B A O 6s 95 J _ 63% NewEngRR5s45 66%
B A O 1st c 48 88 NYC 4Vis2013A 68%
BaltAO5sK2000 54% N Y C con 4s 98 66
B A O cr 60_39 NYNHAH 6s 48 37
B A O 4s 48 87 NYNHAH4Vis67 35%
BeneflndL2Vi61 99 NYNHAH 4s 55. 33
Bost Me 4 Vis 70 50 NYNHAH 4s 57 10%
Can Nat 4Visol 110% Nor! West 4s 98 134%
Can Nat 4Vis57 119% No Pac5s 2047C 96
Can Pac 4s perp 97 NorPac4Vis2047 92
Cent Ga cn5s46 41% NorPac 3s 2047 63%
Cent Oalst5s45 81 Pac TAT 2%s85102%
CenPac Ist4s49 103% PennCtAIr3Vii6054%
CAO 4 Vis 92 .. 140 Penn PALt 3*76105%
CBAQ gn 4s 68 113% PennRR gn5s68 112
C B A Q 2%« 70 93% PennRRg4Vi*P5 106%
ChlIAL4Vi2003 32% PennRR g4'/as8U02%
CM8tP4Vis2044 56 PennRR 3Vis85 90%
C M St P 4s 94 105 PittsStl4Vis50B 105
ChlANW 4Vis99 63% Rutin Cen 4s49 8
CRIP4V*s60 _ 14 SaguenapP 3sl 1105
CRIP Tt 4« 34 _ 42% StLSP 4%s2022 46
CinUnTr 2%s74104% 8tL8anPrn4s97 83%
ClevUnTr4 Vis77104% StLSoWest 5*52101
Cons P 2VaS 76 106 8tL8Wrf5s90 93
DARG3-4s9Siri 82% shell Un 2Vis71 99
DARln4Vi2018wi43% SoPac4'/2sOr77. 95%
Det, Edison 4s65106 So Ry gn 6s 56 109%
Erie 4Vas 2015 65 So Ry cn 5s 94. 118%
Goodrich2%s65 102% So Ry gn 4s 66 94%
Gt, North 5s 73 132% StdOHNJr>%s71. 99%
G MAO 2044 B 61% TexANO3%s90 97
HarlmRAP4s54 100% Third Ave 5s BO 49
Houshld 2J4s70 102 UnPac2Vasfll_ 97%
H! Bell 2%s 81. 104 U 8 Rub 2% 7B 98%
IC 4s 52 94% west Sh 4s 2361 64%
ICCSttou5s63a. 87 West Md 4s 52. 102
ICCStL 4 Vs s 63 80 West Un 5s 51 . 88
Int G N Ist0s52 44 west Un 6s 60 84%
IntHydroE16s44 100 Wise Cent 4s 49 71%
N. Y. Curb Market
LIST INCLUDES ONLY SELECTED ISSUES
CHANGED FROM PREVIOUS CLOSE.
2 -30 IrVingAtrCh Vi* 4%
Alaska Airlines 4 Italian Super A 1%
Am Cynarald la 41% Kalser-Prazer . 6%
Am Gaz & El lb 38% Lakey Fdy ,30g 6%
Am Maracaibo. *% LanstonMMch 1 17
Am Repub We 18% LouL»nd*Ex.SO 13%
Am Superpower 1% McCord Cp ,40g 19%
Argua Inc - 5% Menasco Mfg 1%
Ark. Nat Gas A. 4% Merritt Ch .66* 28%
Atlas Corp ww. S MidWestCorpVib 23%
Barium Steel 4% Midi 8tl n-cum2 28
Baale Refret .40 3% MtdwestOil ,00a 13
Blue Ridge ,43e 3% Mining Cp Can 7%
Breeze Cp 1 .SO 13 Mount Pro ,60a 10%
BrownFDist. 80 17 NatBellasH.20e 3
Burma Ltd . 1 Nat Fuel O .80 12%
CanMarconi.04e 1% Nat Tunnel Ac M 1
Catalin Am .40a 10 New Mex k Aria 4%
Cent *Sw Corp 10 Niagara Hud Pr 7%
CentAcSoWst wd 9% Noma Elec Wb 13%
Cesana Air .16e 2% Northeast Alrl 4%
Chief Cons Mng 1% okla Nat Gas 2 31
Cities Service 30% Pantepec Oil .64 9%
CityAtSbnHm.60 9% Pennroad We 8
Colonial Airline 7% pioneer Gold 3%
ComnAcSou war % pitney-Bow .60 10%
Cons Stl Crp >>t 23% RioGrValG ,05g 1%
Copr Range Vie 9 stLawrence pf 1 30%
Creole Pet 1.20* 30 st. Regis Paper 8%
Crown Cent Pet 4% Salt Dome Oil... 8%
CrownDrug.lOg 3% Select Indus 2%
Cub Atl Bug 1W 21% Shattuck Denn . 3
Domln StlArC W 1*% Solar Aircraft. . 8%
El BondAcShare 10% Solar Mfg 4
El Pw At Lt ww. 3% 8CaiEd4 48cvpf 29%
Eouity Corp 1% std OllKy 1,40a 28%
Fansteei Mtl'ie 14% sterl Alum 1.80 18
Pedders-Quig.80 11% Textron Inc Vi« 11%
FordMCanA W« 18% Trans-Lux .1 S«. 3%
Gen Plywd .80a 21% Tri-Conti w w _ 2%
Goldfield Cons. 1 Unit Aire Prod 2%
Hazeltine Vi*... 13% Unit LtAcRysWg 20%
Hecla Mtn 1 11% Utah-Id8u*.lSg 3%
Hey den Chem 1 21% Utah FAtLt 1 20 21
Humble 011 2 38% Venez Syn 1 Og 3
IntSsfety Rsz B 2%Wolvrlne P Cem 1%
Rates of dividends in the foregoing
table are annual disbursements based on
the last Quarterly or semiannual declara
tion. Unlea* otherwise noted, special or
extra dividends are not Included, a Also
extra or extras, b Plus stock dividend,
d Cash or stock, e Paid last year, f Pay
able In stock, g Declared or paid so far
this year, n New Issue, ww With warrants,
this year, h Payable in Canadian funds
k Accumulated dividends paid or declared
xw Without warrants.
Lhicago Livestock
CHICAGO. June 9 (.Pi (U8DA).—Sala ble
bogs, 8.000: total. 10.600; fairly active and
fully 25 cents higher on most hogs under
250 pound*; some earlier aales heavier
weight hogs also selling a auarter higher;
market closing slow with most advance
lost on weights over 260 pounds; sows
steady to 25 renta higher: top 24.75 spar
ingly; few loads 24.65: bulk 170-250
pounds 23.75-24.50: good and choice. 280
280 pounds. 23.00-24.00; 290-330 pounds.
21.50- 22-75; most good and choice sows
over 400 pounds. 17.50-18.50; lighter
weights, un to 19.50.
Salable cattle. 17.000. total. 17.300:
lalsble calves, 1.000: total. 1.000; fed
steers and yearlings Including yearling
heifers strong. active; good and choice
steers predominated at 24.75-27.60: about
t dozen load*. 27.50. the top: nothing
strictly choice here: good and choice
heifer*. 24.00-26.00. with 1 000-pound:
choice offerings. 26.25. stock cattle Arm.:
with good and choice Southwest bred:
light yearlings selling freely at 22.00
23.00; cows scarce: good cows firm at i
17.50- 21.00; eannera and cutters, mostlv
10.00-13.50 or steady: bulla steady at:
17 50 down, and vealers unchanged at I
28.00.
Salable sheep—1.500: total. 3.500; f»w :
sales medium and good clipped lambs
steady to 26 cents higher at 20.00-2160:
3ood and choice dipped lambs absent,
auotable 25 eents or more higher or
around 23.00; small lots medium to good
native soring lambs. 22.00-24.75; strletlv
rood and choice springers sbsent. salsble
around 26.00: bidding around 50 cants
lower on small lots slaughter ewez. best
early bid. 7.80.
Market Averages
STOCKS. 30 15 15 60
Indst. Ralls, mil. Stka.
let change_—.1 unc. unc —.1
rodgy noon-87.0 29.9 41.8 61.1
»rev. day. 87.1 29.9 41.8 91-2
fp 88:? $1:1 If:l
rl47 -ti l hi ii
.947 low_83.2 27.7 40.8 58.5
BONDS. 20 10 10 1010 Low
Raila. Indst. Util. Pirn. Yield,
let ehange —l unc. —.1 unc. unc.
roday noon 90.3 103.5 106 3 73.6 115 6
>rev. day_ 90.4 103.5 105.4 73.6 115 6
Week ago . 90 4 103.4 lOS.S 73 4 1156;
ionth ago 92.1 103.7 105.8 74.2 116 0
rear ago .102.7 103.9 107 6 77.6 118 *
947 high- 97.1 104.2 1 05.7 78.8 llfl.S
947 low 696 103.2 104f: 73.0 115.3
(Compiled br the Associated Press.)
Wallace in New Jersey
For $25-a-Plate Dinner
ly *• Associated Press
NEWARK, N. J., June 9.—Henry
Wallace will make four speeches,
confer with the press, church and
labor leaders, and attend a $25-a
plate dinner in his honor here today
as part of a drive tar what the spon
sors say will be a political fund to
back a “progressive candidate for
President in 1948."
The visit of the former Vice Pres
ident is being sponsored by the New
Jersey Independ<fc* Citizens League
which said it had issued 7,000 in
vitations to the Essex House dinner
tonight.
AM A Urged to Restore
i Family Doctor to
Position of Prestige
fty the Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY, N. JM June
! 9—The outgoing and incoming
(presidents of the American Medical
I Association said today there was a
need to restore the family doctor
i to a position of “importance and
1 prestige."
ur. narrison n. ouuuiucis 01
Nashville, Tenn.. AMA president,
told the opening session of the or
ganization's House of Delegates
that 85 per cent of the diseases
for which persons seek medical
advice can be diagnosed and treated
properly by the family doctor.
In an address to the House of
Delegates immediately following
Dr. Shoulder's speech. Dr. Edward
L. Bortz of Philadelphia, AMA
president-elect, said the time was
appropriate for the association to
institute a two-day general session
for family doctors during AMA con
ventions.
Dr. Shoulders said there were
“more nearly, if not completely,
adequate” numbers of specialists to
meet the needs of the Nation. He
said only 60 per cent of the coun
try s physicians were family doctors.
He recommended appointment of
a special committee by the AMA's
Board of Trustees to determine the
“type and quantity of medical
care which the people need and/or
desire.”
Dr. Bortz, asked the House of
Delegates to recommend five men
to be known as the committee on
nursing problems. Dr. Bortz said
a questionnaire issued by the Amer
ican Surgical Association "indicated
the quantity of nursing talent avail
able was 60 per cent of what it
should be, and the quality was es
timated as down to 75 per cent of
that desirable.”
Plans for More Doctors.
Dr. Bortz suggested, too, that
third and fourth year medical stu
dents should be. given “the privi
lege of more active participation in
the activities and privileges of the
association.” He said the students
should be offered “affiliate mem
berships.”
Plans to give tne American puu
11c many more doctors by establish
ing new' medical colleges and by
increasing the training in existing
schools w’ere reported to the associ
ation today by the Board of Trus
tees.
The United States now has 150,
000 physicians in active practice,
20,000 of them specialists. The
present training, including medical
school, takes about 10 years, and the
present 86 schools are filled to the
limit. These schools can graduate
little more than 5,000 doctors a year.
The AMA itself builds no schools,
but makes5 itself responsible for ap
proving nigh standards of training.
Charges have been printed since
the war that the medical profession
was not trying to increase the
number of doctors to the extent
needed for improved medical care.
The trustees' report today gives a
quite different picture.
New Medical College*.
The new medical colleges are the
University of Washington, now com
pleting its first year, and the Uni
versity of California at Los Angeles,
where construction is about to be
gin. Also entirely new medical
schools, the trustees’ report says,
are under consideration in Connec
ticut, Florida, Maine, New Jersey.
New York and two in Canada,
Saskatchewan and British Colum
bia.
Four established American med
ical schools have extended their
courses from two years to the full
four years required for a medical
degree. These are the Medical Col
lege of Alabama at Birmingham,
and the colleges in Utah, South Da
kota and Iowa.
Seven thousand extra doctor*
were graduated during the war by
medical speed up that omitted va
cations. The medical colleges have
now gone back mostly to normal
speed, on the idea that better doc
tors can be produced by the extra
time.
Enrollments Are lip.
Nevertheless, says the report, the
number of freshmen entering med
ical schools this year, 5.214. is about
1500 more than in any prewar years.
This includes 11 per cent of women,
which is nearly double feminine
enrollments of a few years ago.
More than 60 per cent of the fresh
men this year are war veterans.
The trustees reported that volun
tary medical care, the system advo
cated by the AMA in place of en
forced, State medical insurance and
care, now has an enrollment of
about 5,000,000. This is nearly dou
ble the number of persons enrolled
a year ago.
Forty-seven States and the Dis
trictof Columbia. Hawaii and Porto
Rico have either plans in operation
or under development.
U.N. Mission Prepares
For Palestine Trip
To Start Tomorrow
•y the Associated Press
LAKE SUCCESS. June 9.—Mem
bers of the United Nations Commis
sion on Palestine speeded last
minutes preparations today for de
parture for Jerusalem, where their
on-the-spot investigation of the
Holy Land trouble is expected to get
under way next Sunday.
Delegates to the 11-nation mission,
established by a recent special ses
sion of the U. N. General Assembly,
were summoned to meet today to
dispose of.the last details. Some of
the group will leave tomorrow and
the remainder will depart Wednes
day, headed by Chairman Emil
Sandstrom of Sweden.
The mission will have just 75 day*
in which to formulate recommenda
tions for submission to the Septem
ber meeting of the Assembly.
Arab Attitude a Puixle.
In order to facilitate the commis
sions’s work an advance p&rty of
secretaries and assistants has pre
ceded it to the Middle East. A dis
patch from Cairo last night told of
the alrrival of the advance party
there by plane and indicated the
group would continue on to Palestine
at once.
As the commission prepared to
launch its inquiry two major ques
tions still remained unanswered:
1. Will the Arabs co-operate with
the commission or boycott the dis
cussions^
2. Will the delegates visit the
displaced person camps in Europe
where thousands of Jews are wait
ing to enter Palestine? The Jewish
Agency contends the DP issue is
part of the whole Palestine prob
lem, while the Arabs say it has no
connection.
U. S. Group Opposes Jewish Slate.
Meanwhile, the American Council
for Judaism, an organization of
American Jews, opposed the estab
lishment of a Jewish state In Pal
estine.
The council said in a statement to
the inquiry commission that such
proposals were "a threat to the
peace and security of Palestine and
its surrounding area and harmful
to the Jews in Palestine and the
Jews elsewhere throughout the
world.”
The statement, signed by Lessing
J. Rosenwald. president, maintained
that the fundamental claim that the
Jews the world over have automatic
rights in regard to the Holy Land
was a concept which must be re
garded as “abhorrent,”
Ask Preservation of Status.
The council asked the U. N. com
mission to protect Jews of the world
against Jewish nationalism and pre
serve their status as “free and equal
citizens of the lands of their birth
or adoption."
Declaring that specific safeguards
against Jewish nationalism should
be set up, the council said otherwise
"millions of Jews will suffer irre
parable harm by virtue of a con
fused status as to their national re
lationship to the various countries
in which they are, and desire to re
main, citizens.”
The council’s attitude conflicted
sharply with the stand taken by the
Jewish Agency, the only Jewish
group to testify at the recent As
sembly session. The agency de
manded a Jewish homeland in Pal
estine with provisions for an inde
pendent Jewish nation.
Boston is the largest American
fishing port on the Atlantic.
~ LOANS
ON
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monthly parmeats. at famrafcle rata
FIRST DEED OF TRUST ONLT
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NA. 0366
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