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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 12, 1947, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1947-08-12/ed-1/seq-8/

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Indonesian Orders

To Violate Truce
Seized, Dutch Say
Sy th# Awociotyd Fr*ti
BATAVIA, Java., Aug. 12.—
Dutch military authorities re
ported today that Netherlands
troops In Sumatra had captured
Indonesian Republican Army
orders authorizing an attack on
a Dutch camp in direct violation
!>f the truce effective a week ago
ast midnight.
A Dutch communique asserted
that the orders had been captured
when Republican forces attempted
to infiltrate a Dutch position at
Baungln, near Pandang on the
west coast of Sumatra.
More than 20 members of the Re
publican regular and irregular
forces were captured, the communi
que said, and orders dated August
Z were found in their possession
showing that the attack had been
ordered by Indonesian authorities.
The Dutch communique followed
the broadcast of a Republican bul
letin from Jogjagarta accusing the
Netherlands forces of further truce
violations.
New Measures Held Necessary.
The action at Baungin was only
one of a series of truce violations
reported by the Dutch in both Java
and Sumatra, which Netherlands
| uthorlties said were compelling
them to take new military meas
ures.
The largest incident was reported
near Mangli, southwest of Amba
rawa in North Central Java, where
the Dutch said 350 Republicans had
attacked their lines. The Dutch
forces used rifles, machine guns and
hand grenades to repel the attack,
the communique said.
Sniping also was reported in
South Sumatra, where the Dutch
said the Republicans constructed
new roadblocks and destroyed
bridges near Lahat.
Dutch casualties resulting from
continued hostilities were listed a:
three killed and four wounded yes
terday.
Fight Off Attack.
Three British consular official!
and a Dutch civilian fought off t
90-minute attack of 30 Indonesiar
extremists Sunday at a week enc
resort 60 miles southwest of Batavia
competent sources disclosed.
At least one Indonesian was killet
in the fight, in'which the lives of t
British woman, a Dutch woman anc
two Dutch children were saved b:
the stout defense the Britishers ant
the Dutchman put up before t
Dutch military convoy broki
through and rescued them, eyewit
nesses said.
The British were identified a
Consul Colin McLaren, Vice Const:
William Brower and Military At
tache Maj. Robert Braber. The}
together with Mrs. McLaren, hai
been spending the week end at th
home of A. M. Neervort, Dutch cu
rator of Tjibodas Botanical Gar
dens, on the slopes of the extinc
volcano Mount Prangrango, betwee;
Bandoeng and Bultenzorg.
At about 4:30 in the afternoor
the eyewitnesses said, 30 Indonesian
approached, carrying a red and
white Indonesian flag, and began
firing at the week-end party. The
Britons raced .to the house, armed
themselves with guns which Mr.
Neervbrt kept to protect his wife
and two children, and returned the
Are
At 6 g>.m. a Dutch Army jeep ap
proached, covered the Indonesians
with 'lire and then sped away for
help. Three hours later the be
sieged party was rescued by a mili
tary convoy and taken to safety.
Dutch Propose Formation
Of Federal Government
THE HAGUE, Aug. 13 <*V-Hie
Netherlands government today pro
posed the immediate formation of
an Indonesian federal interim gov
ernment for the East Indies, includ
ing those areas occupied by Dutch
military forces-in recent “police ac
tion.” ✓
The government’s statement pro
posed that the interim,government
be composed of representatives of
the Indonesian Republic, the state
of East Indonesia and West Borneo
and of those minorities "that are
not yet represented adequately."
The formation of such an interim
government would not delay a "last
ing solution” of the future of the
East Indies, the statement asserted
(The states of East Indonesia
—the islands east of Java and
south of Borneo—and West Java
were to be joined with the re
public of Indonesia—Java, Su
matra and Madoera—as “the
United States of Indonesia" un
der terms of the Linggadjatl
agreement signed by the Nether
lands and the republic last
March. Differences over details
of that agreement led to the
break in negotiations between
Dutch and Republican repre
sentatives and the subsequent
military action launched by
Dutch authorities several weeks
ago.)
The statement said' the Nether
lands government was willing b
decrease the number of its arme;
forces in Indonesia "as soon as i
proper police force will be able ti
maintain law and order."
_•_B-.i_
| i fiuv/iiwiliiiJ rvoiuic
For Arbitration Group
JOGJAKARTA, Java, Aug. 1
1 iVP).—Authoritative sources said to
day that the Indonesian govern
’ ment had transmitted to America!
, Consul General Walter P. Foote ii
Batavia a restatement of its desir
| for appointment of an internations
' arbitration commission to Work ou
I a final settlement with the Dutcl
L The sources said the statemen
, had been relayed to Mr. Foote b
’ a special radio channel this morn
ing with a renewed expression c
s appreciation'for the United Statei
1 offer of its "good offices” in settlin
. the dispute.
The statement was said to hav
1 been agreed upon at a 4-hour cab
» inet session last night after M
. Foote—who made a special plan
- trip to Jogjakarta yesterday to con
t fer with Indonesian officials—ha
i returned to Batavia.
Salaries in Singapore, Malaya, ar
s now double those before the war.
Racial Dispute Delays
Sailing of Freighter
^ By rtn Auociolsd Pr#t»
NORFOLK, Va„ Aug. 12.—Because
engine room officers objected to eat
ing with a colored wireless operator,
the American freighter Robert R.
McBurney, bound for Italy with a
Cargo of coal, was held In port
over Sunday, but sailed yesterday,
the Coast Guard disclosed.
The colored radio officer had been
cent by the CIO American Com
munication Association office here
following a routine request for a
qualified operator. When he reported
on board members of the Marine
Engineer Beneficial Association
(CIO) declared they would not sail
with the ship unless he were put
ashore.
The MEBA. although a CIO af
filiate, does not follow the racial
“checkerboarding” practices of its
co-affiliate deck and radio unions in
the CIO, union members said. The
McBumey's deck crew, members of
the APL International Seafarers
Union, were also reported as pro
testing the colored officer's presence.
-The McBumey early yesterday ob
tained a white man as wireless oper
ator and the colored operator was
sent to the SS Booker T. Washing
ton, now lying off Bewails Point. The
Washington, manned by a NMU
crew, is skippered by a colored mas
ter.
A Syrian oil firm will drill explor
atory wells at three points north of
Aleppo.
I it 1
Mrs. Edna Pearl Bean
Diels iii Annapolis
ANNAPOLIS, Aug. 13 (JP).—Mrs.
Edna Pear) Bean, wile’ of City Com
missioner Harry E. Bean, died at
her home here Sunday.
She is survived also by a son,
MaJ. Robert C. Bean, a sister, Mrs.
Anna Bachmann, and a brother,
Robert O. Johnson, both of New
York.
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