OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 11, 1947, Image 18

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1947-09-11/ed-1/seq-18/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-18

THIS AMAZING PIANIST FROM
X THE PHILIPPINES IS A SENSATION
HEAR HIM PERFORM!
RODOLFO CORNEJO
NIGHTLY 5 to 7 and 10 to 1
Bax clmL cuuint—(4 the {.ivieit
luncheon • Cocktoil Hour • Dinner
No tax • No cover • No minimumjyer_
mMMaSam
Pennsylvania Avenue at 1 8th Street
After Dark
Cafe Caprice Is a Concert Hall
With the Arrivel of Mr. Cornejo
By HARRY MacARTHUR.
Tuesday night was the one we had
set aside for checking up on things
around the town. Didn’t get very
far with that project, though. Our
first mistake was made when we
stopped first at the Cafe Caprice
of the Roger Smith Hotel, where
Rodolfo Cornejo is adding an un
usually bright fillip to the After
Dark entertainment of the town.
When Mr. Cornejo sat down at the
piano it seemed most sensible to
stay right there as long as possible.
He is a classical pianist of great
skill, making the Cafe Caprice the
only place in town where there is
a piano recital every afternoon and
evening of the W'eek. Mr. Cornejo’s
technique seems an assured one and
his music has the sound of music
made by a man who likes his work.
His repertoire appears to be a large
one, ranging from Philippine folk
songs to Beethoven and back again
with such varied stopovers as “Clare
de Lune” and “Ritual Fire Dance.”
Mr. Cornejo also includes some
DANCING NOW
Every Saturday Night at
Bernie Jarboe’s Inn
to Bernie Jarboe’s Music
Orchestra—10 P.M. Till 1 A. M.
Mixed Drinks...Steaks...Chicken..,
Sandwiches
Waldorf. Md. • 18 Mi. from D. C.
Route 5 • Phone Waldorf 2311
I =35
HAY-ADAMS
H OH S E
Opposite the White House
16th & H Sts. N.W.
Entrante now open on H
St, or through hotol lobby,
NEW
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
Now you can relax In
the Morris-chair atmos
phere of our new cock
tail lounge and enjoy
the double pleasure of
fine drinks served In
quiet, comfortable sur
roundings. Fit for your
discriminating tastes ...
perfect for your quiet
diversion. Hors d’oeuvres
served from 4 to 8 p. m.
IWlilHIiM** *
BB V POPULAR GEORGIA BUTLER^
rL and JERRY KING *
|PE|I1 If Not... See and Hear Them
lllii yC Now at the
ANCHOR *
ROOM
"Waihington'i Moil Unique
Cocktail Lounge
w 5:30-7:30 t.M.—* *111 Cteslng
NO (OYH—NO MINIMUM
Hotel Annapolis
12th and H Streets N.W.
(Restaurant HALL’S Carden I
7th and K Streets S.W. I
Off the Water Front ME. 8580 ■
"GARDEN NOW OPEN" ■
Steaks • Chops * Chicken I
Lobsters • Soft Shell Crabs 1
Frog Legs * Smithfield Ham 1
Finest Mixed Drinks I
DAILY LUNCHEON, 60c UP I
Ample Parking Space Op*n Dailv Exe. Sunday, 11 to 11 I
*
diverting musical tricks, such as
the business of playing the Sextet
from "Lucia” in an arrangement
for left hand alone. This is such
a trick that we didn’t even recognize
that he was playing, the Sextet
being something you don’t expect
to turn up on a piano under a man’s
left hand.
Mr. Cornejo, incidentally, will be
Dr. Cornejo before he goes back
home to the Philippines, where he
is president of the National Federa
tion of Musicians, He did the work
for the Ph. D. recently at Kansas
City College, writing a thesis on
philosophy and composing a cantata.
He already has composed, among
other things, a symphony at t£e
behest of the Philippine govern
ment.
★ * * *
We finally decided we'd better see
how things were with Dona Mason
and went over to the King Cole
Room. Miss Mason was sitting on
the bar singing "The Whiffenpoof
Song” so, out of respect to Monty
Woolley, who thinks it should not
be sung in the presence of women,
let alone by one, we stood out on
the sidewalk until she finished. We
might as well have not waited. Miss
Mason was vivacious, but newsless.
And Pianist Bob Brewer needed
Rendezvous for Music Lovers
Superb Cuisine. Continental Atmosphere
Luncheon Served 11:30 to 3
Dinner 4:30 to 10 Every Day Except Mon.
No Cover—No Tax 4
FOR RESERVATIONS RE. 1356
1020 VERMONT AVE., N.W.
i _AIR CONDITIONED
r y^
£ A,R CONDITIONED
ySU RESTAURANT
129 Kennedy St. N.W.
• • •
WISH ALL THEIR
FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
• • •
KOSHER STYLE FOOD AT IT#
VERY BEST
• • •
CLOSED FOR THE HOLIDAYS ON
MONDAY. 15 th—TUESDAY. 18th
WEDNESDAY, 17th ALSO
TUESDAY, 23rd A WEDNESDAY, 24th
TAylor9359 RAndolph 9754
FIVE-COURSE jjj
DINNER §
from $1.50 in
| Served from m
5 to 9 P.M. pl
, Lai ala Trio Plays L_
jf\i CONTINUOUS U
JJh DANCE MUSIC P
/V IV l From 8:30 'til Closing k
/ V I) (M J . . . JOHNNY ROBB J-l
1 V] y and his Modrillonians
\ fy 1/ —alternating with Ra- "
\J \ ‘/j 'X mon's Rumba orchestra. k
r\ SUE M,LR0Y and t
! yy ‘ J j Miguolito, Vocalists |
r /i / Reserv°hons: "
/^^^^Dlstrict 4561 i
mwh— n i'11iiiiiiii iiiiiiiiHi iCMiH'
Dorothy Dix more than he needed us.
Newsless also were Johnny Robb
and his singer, Sue Milroy, when
we found them at the Madrillon.
All they wanted of life was the de
parture of the last few customers
so they could get a rehearsal started.
We should have stayed at the Cafe
Caprice listening to Mr. Cornejo.
We went home.
* * * *
The Midnight Merry-Go-Round:
That bandstand Paul Kain was
hinting awhile back that he would
be on come fall will be the one at
the Club Cairo. He’ll be leading his
new orchestra there when the club
reopens for the,new season... . Bob
Simpson, last year’s Cairo band
leader, likes it at the Old Hew Or
leans and will remain there for
awhile. . . . Milt Davis will be back
in the Hotel Hamilton's .Rainbow
Room sometime this month. . . .
Don’t you ever call an accordion a
“squeeze box” again. Treat them
with respect. Dick Bailey, of Sammy
Ferro’s Neptune Room crew, just
bought a new accordion for $1,500.
. . . Sacha Lucas, who has been
playing at the Saranac Inn at Lake
Saranac during the summer, starts
an engagement of two weeks, maybe
more, early next month at* the
Brown Derby. Or whatever phoenix
rises from the fiscal ashes of that
Connecticut avenue spot.
It was A1 Simmonds, proprietor of
the Brown Derby for many years,
who was on the telephone the other
day to report his happy discovery
about peoplt'. His long experience
in the night clubs seems to have
tended to make him expect other
wise, but he has discovered that
people are not funny; they’re fine.
“You’d fall over if I told you what
I’m doing now,” Mf. S. said.
“Well, what are you doing?” we
asked, moving over to the chair with
arms.
“Selling pastrami,” he said. “I
work in a delicatessen. I thought
they’d have to carry me out to the
car after the first day, but I’ve been
here three weeks now and I’m get
ting so I can do a whole day’s work
without collapsing.
“What surprises me is the number
of old Brown Derby customers who
come in here. I thought they’d
laugh when they found me. I don’t
know why they should laugh at a
guy doing an honest job, but I
thought they might. They don’t,
though. They all rush over, shake
my hand, wish me the best of luck
and hope I get back in the night
club business somewhere around
town. People are wonderful.”
Benefit Bali Game Slated
Sept. 20 for Martha Repass
i A baseball game between the
Montgomery County police and
members of the Gaithersburg
Washington Grove Volunteer Fire
Department will be held at Welsh
Field, Rockville, at 2 p.m. Septem
ber 20, tp raise funds for the care
of Martha Jane Repass, 13, Gaith
ersburg farm girl, who was injured
by a propeller accident August 14.
Tickets for- the game now are on
sale in the Bethesda. Silver Spring,
Takoma Park and Rockville police
stations, or they may be purchased
from members of the coilhty force
or the Gaithersburg-Washington
Grove fire company. All proceeds
will go toward the Repass campaign
j fund. Tickets will cost 50 cents
I Of the $1,600 donated so far, aboui
i $1,100 has been used for hospital
expenses and special nursing care
campaign officials reported yester
day.
The girl suffered the loss of ar
eye as well as numerous skull and
face injuries when she ran into the
I whirling propeller of a packed air
j plane on her father’s farm.
MM |
SEND YOUR
CHILDREN TO ■WWWPflWWff®
SCHOOL WITH ■HMWMkUMrWMMlfl
CLEAN nKUu^Ll^IJK
MiAPti f^mglUafliimmp
i A tl»on, affective insecticide. Net
oily er sticky. Only SOc.AII Dwggiste
AnicUctiK £ccuU t&e TOcuff
FIRST DIRECT
DC-6 SERVICE TO
LOS ANGELES
t6e 0?€Wte&t—9 fotvu, 55 HtutuUtf
This new, convenient flight enables you to
reach Los Angeles at 9:00 a.m. PST, ready
for a full day of business or pleasure.
Phone Executive 2345
Ticket Offices: Statler Hotel and 813 15th Street N. W,
AMERICAN AIRLINES
f^pum
r—MUVfyffkafHEATING SYSTEMS
W OR BOILER REPLACEMENTS
j AMERICANo/? NATIONAL Complete hot
\ water heating plants. • Engineered Heat
I means a scientifically designed job by our
' engineers and a neat workmanlike in
stallation by experienced mechanics
No Down Payment«3yrs.to Pay
ENGINEERING COMPANY
r-~ i
:
%

h -
Never in peacetime history
have American steelworkers
and mills turned out so
much steel in so short a time
Here is the record of the steel industry for the
first eight months of 1947:
Exceeded all previous peacetime
performances.
Production of steel ingots since January 1 was
56 million tons—an annual rate of about 85
million tons. This is 60 per cent more produc
tion than was turned out during 1939. last
prewar year.
Met major demands of an abnormal
market.
Like your family pantry and wardrobe, shelves of
American industry were depleted at the end of the
war. Thousands of manufacturers wanted steel
for their current needs. They also wanted steel to
build up their low stocks of material. This war•
created abnormal demand is being steadily met.
Made more steel for more goods for
you.
All records were smashed in shipments of flat
rolled steel to those making automobiles,
refrigerators, bathtubs, kitchen cabinets and like
products. At this rate the 1947 shipments of flat
rolled steel will exceed 1939 by 79 per cent.
Although today the productive capacity of the
American steel industry equals all of the rest
of the world combined, the industry is not
stopping there. Steel is spending a record total
of nearly $450,000,000 in 1947 alone for new
equipment and improvements. Even greater
plans are in making for the future. Steel has never
stood still.
This means more and better steel for you.
American Iron and Steel Institute
350 Fifth Avenue • New York 1, N. Y.
There are 101 member companies of the Institute tvith plants in 173 American communities. They produce 96.3 per cent cj the country s steel.
* * i

xml | txt