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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 28, 1947, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1947-09-28/ed-1/seq-8/

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New Packard Models
Go Into Production;
- Some Prices Lower
By th« Asiocioted Pr«>
DETROIT, Sept. 27.—Packard
Motor Car Co. announced today
' that along with the best output
'« month of the year to date It had
put its 1948 model line into pro
duction without a single day's
stoppage of assembly lines.
George T. Christopher, Packard
president, described the accomplish
ment as "without precedent in the
industry,” and disclosed that the
1948 line will consist mainly of three
all-new eight-cylinder vehicles.
They will include 17 different body
types, with new "free flow” styling,
four different chassis and three new
straight-eight engines developing
130, 145 and 160 horsepower.
Discontinued are the “120” model
; and most of the six-cylinder units.
Mr. Christopher said production of
some sixes would continue, mainly
for taxicabs and for export.
Prices for some of the new mod
els, Mr. Christopher said, are lower
than those of comparable 1947 types.
’ Some prices remain unchanged, he
; added,- while others are increased
somewhat, particularly those which
did not figure in the last announced
t Increases.
t Probably the most startling change
in the new Packard is the "free
flow” styling, in which the lines run
) straight from front to rear, with
no bumps or protrusions of any
kind. None of the new models has
rear fenders; the bodies extend over
the wheels.
The new Packards and prices (de
livered in Detroit, State taxes ex
tra) are:
Eights (130 horsepower, 120-inch
wheelbase)—Club sedan, $2,125 (pre
vimialv 1*2 124)- tnirrintr kpHati £2.
150 (previously $2,149); station se
dan, $3,350; de luxe club sedan, $2,
350; de luxe touring sedan, $2,375.
There were no comparable previous
models for the latter three. Super
eights (145 horsepower, 120-inch
wheelbase)—Club sedan, $2,665 (pre
viously $2,747); touring sedan, $2,
690 (previously $2,772); convertible,
$3,175 (unchanged). (145 horse
power, 141-inch wheelbase)—Seven
passenger sedan, $3,300; seven-pas
senger limousine, $3,450; de luxe
seven-passenger sedan, $3,650; de
luxe seven-passenger limousine, $3,
800. There were no comparable
models for the 141-inch line.
Custom super eights (160 horse
power, 127-inch wheelbase)—Club
sedan, $3,625 (previously $3,384);
touring sedan, $3,675 (previously $3,
449); convertible, $4,095 (un
changed). (160 horsepower, 148
lnch wheelbase)—Seven passenger
sedan, $4,504 (unchanged); seven
passenger limousine, $4,668 (un
changed).
Library Group to Meet
In Cleveland Park
Members of the Community Com
mittee of the Cleveland Park Memo
rial Library will hold their annual
meeting at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the
home of Mrs. Cazenove Lee, 3542
Newark street N.W.
Mrs. Lee, chairman of the com
onH ntVior nffirorc will ronnrt
on progress of the committee's drive
to get a library in the Cleveland
Park area. The committee, through
subscriptions, has raised $30,000 to
wards purchase of a library lot.
The committee also will discuss
plans for its Children’s Book Fair
this fall. "Under the plan, the com
mittee will sell children's books to
get funds to buy equipment for the
proposed branch library and pro
vide operating funds for the com
mittee.
Parry N. Peterson, District librar
ian, is expected to be present at the
meeting.
Exchange Club to Join
School in Track Meet
Members of the Exchange Club
of Washington will join boys of the
National Training School in a track
and field meet at 2 p.m. today on
the school’s main playground.
The club is sponsoring the meet
as a part of Attorney General
Clark's campaign against juvenile
delinquency.
Prizes will be given high-point
scorers.
Club members will try to re
capture the athletic prowess of
their school days by taking part in
J a number of the events.
Walter Karig, Back From Pacif ic, Looks Forward
To Arrival of Hand-Carved Outrigger Canoe
Next Book to Describe
Micronesia, He Says;
His 'Zotz' Out Soon
By John A. Giles
If you see a genuine, hand-carved
micronesian outrigger canoe on the
Potomac some day, don’t be alarmed.
f Your imagination will not have
taken you to the far Pacific.
The happy man at the helm
undoubtedly will be Capt, Walter
! Kraig, USNR, the first bonafide
; Washington author to have a book
selected by the Book of the Month
| Club. His “Zotz!”—even Capt. Kraig
admits it’s an odd name, which
he just picked out of thin air—is the
club’s October selection.
The captain gets up early these
crisp mornings to see if there is
any w’ord from his friends in distant
Mokil Atoll in the Caroline Islands.
The islanders are shipping him a
600-pound outrigger canoe, crated
in some 1,200 pounds of fine mahog
any.
Lots of Souveniers.
The arrival of the canoe will be
no surprise to Capt. Kraig’s friends
and neighbors at Seminary Hill,
!in Alexandria. They've got used to
such deliveries. A donkey (she
I bix's intermittently in the back
yard), a skunk (properly de-odor
;ized), seven cats, two dogs and
| other mementoes from all over the
world have arrived already.
Neither were the captain’s friends
greatly surprised when the former
I Foreign Legionnaire, newspaper
j man, Washington correspondent,
i world traveler, amateur magician,
rairiax uounty volunteer nreman,
etc., etc., won the club’s selection.
Book Was By-Product.
The author himself is very sur
prised.” He wrote the novel for his
own and his family's amusement
("I used to read it aloud to them at
night,” he says) while editing the
Navy's official “Battle Report” and
attending to other naval matters.
It’s like “finding a $20 bill in an
old book that you paid a dime for
and enjoyed reading.”
Navy officers from Adak to Manila
probably are still trying to decode
the radio message his commanding
officer here sent him when the Book
of the Month Club announced its
selection: “Zotz BMC Dual October.
Congrats.” At that moment the
j author was at Bikini on Navy busi
j ness, recovering from a character
j istically out-of-the-ordinary acci
; dent; he broke three ribs falling
out of an outrigger canoe.
“I'd never have given the book
that title if I had thought it would
do so well,” says the author. He
has written about 25 other books
in his career, the last having been
j the best seller, “Lower Than Angels.”
Selection Means Good Return.
The club selection means more
than $50,000 to the author. He
stands to make at least $50,000 more,
since there are reports that he will
get a bid for the movie rights.
‘'I’ve ^ only read that in the news
! papers now,” he hastens to add.
i Briefly, “Zotz!” is the story of an
individual who accidentally acquires
i an age-old piece of magic which
i enables him to kill any living thing
simply by pointing his finger in
its direction and saying “Zotz!”
John P. Marquand describes it as[
“the funniest story that has been
j written yet about wartime Wash
i ington.”
Capt. Karig, 49, is a native of
.New York City who was moved to
New Jersey at an early age. He grew
up a country boy.
"I milked a cow when I had to
j sit on a high-chair to reach it,” he
| says.
Is Hard on Caps, r
| He is heavy set, but not fat, with
a small mustache, twinkling eyes,
and grey, receding hair. His uni
forms are well cut and neat, but his
*ap always looks as If he had Just
fished it out of the ocean.
He is tall and quite serious to the
I casual acquaintance. With friends,
! however, he is affable and some
Neuritis Pains
For quick, delightfully comforting help for
aches and pains of Rheumatism, Arthritis,
Neuritis, Lumbago, Sciatica, or Neuralgia try
Romind. A pleasant tasteless medicine that
works through the blood. First dooe usually
starts alleviating pain so you can work, en
joy life and sleep more comfortably. Get
Remind at druggist today. Take as directed.
1 Satisfaction or money back guaranteed.
The American University
School of Social Sciences
and Public Affairs , e saa
Evening and Saturday Classes
Announces A Course In
AIR TRANSPORTATION
I
L. M. Homberger
Professor of Transportation
Special lecturers include: Emory T. Nunnely, General
Counsel; Warner H. Hord, Chief, Rates and Audit
Division; Sydney B. Smith, Acting Chief, Foreign Air
Transport Division; Louis W. Goodkind, Assistant Di
rector, Economics Bureau, and David W. Bluestone,
Chief Analyst, Analysis Division, Civil Aeronautics
Board; Richard E. Elwell, General Counsel; Paul
Morris, Director, Operations, Airport Services, Civil
A ^.A.:—- A A • Inmoc C' KJ d I Con rhipf - I
Transport Division, Department of Commerce; M. F.
Redfern, Vice-President, Air Transport Association of
America; John B. Crane, Transport Economist, Admin
istrative Assistant to Senator George W. Malone; E. M.
Fitch, Consultant in Industrial Relations; Samuel E.
Gates, formerly Deputy Chief-of-Staff, Air Transport
Command.

A comprehensive study of operation, traffic, rates, and
government action in air transportation and a con
sideration of the problems of management of air-car
riers in the postwar period. Lectures by leading au
thorities in the industry and in the regulatory agencies.

For information, ivrite or phone Secretary
School of Social Sciences and Public Affairs
1901 F Street N.W. (6) MEtropolitan 0258
I REGISTRATION OPEN
i
> ...
I
r A
Capt. Walter Karig, U.S.N.R., Is shown working on his next
| book, which will be about life in Micronesia. His work table is
' covered with a dress from the Caroline Islands,
i —Star Staff Photo.
times even loquacious, with a wry
humor very much like Marquand's.
At the Navy Department, the
captain seldom gives orders or en
gages in conversation with his
“Battle Report” staff. He is apt to
give them handwritten memos em-,
bellished with doodles and quaint;
drawings. He is also an artist and
once had difficulty deciding whether
he wanted to be an artist or a writer.
He has illustrated “Zotz!” himself.:
Never Dictates Letters.
He never dictates a letter, but
writes it out in meticulous longhand!
which is very clear. He types his
books on a portable. Much of his;
work on the "Battle Report" vol
umes has been in editing and re
vising the rough drafts by his staff,;
using his knack for punching in;
the right adjectives and adverbs, 5
and clipping off excessive verbage.
He also writes speeches and
statements for the Secretary of the
Navy and other top officials. He is
a member of the Secretary's com
mittee on reorganization and co
ordination of the Navy with the
new Defense Department.
When World War I broke out he
was rejected by all branches of the
service because of poor eyes, plus
some deficiency in his teeth caused
by having walked out of the wrong
door of a barn loft in his youth.
He went to Quebec and joined, end
ing up in the Free Polish Army in
which he rose to the rank of captain.
Moved to New Jersey.
In 1919 Capt. Karig became sports
writer on the Norfolk (Va.) Vir
ginian Pilot. A year later he moved
to the Newark Evening News. In
1932 he became that paper’s chief
editorial writer and two years later
| chief of its Washington bureau. He
i also corresponded for several British
papers and Liberty magazine.
During this same period Capt.
Karig discovered the pulp maga
zines and vice versa. Under one
name or another—Carolyn Keene,
Julia K. Duncan, Doris Force, and
I
Keats Patrick—he batted out Ju
venile and adventure stories.
His next book will be a travel
volume about Micronesia—the trus
tee islands of the far Pacific.
"That outrigger canoe should give
me some atmosphere,” he says.
Justice Morris to Speak
At Fraternity Dinner
Justice James W. Morris of Dis
trict Court will speak at a joint
initiation and banquet of three local
chapters of Gamma Eta Gamma,
national legal fraternity, next Sat
urday night in the Mayflower Hotel.
Georgetown, George Washington
and Catholic Universitiy chapters!
will take part. The class to be
initiated is to be named the "James
W. Morris Class.”
Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson and
other prominent members of the
bench and bar are to attend, it was
announced.
Sheep have two skins, separated
by a layer of fat. The lower skin
produces hair and the upper skin,
wool.
Three Held in Thefts
From Meat Plant
Two men brought into Municipal
Court yesterday were charged with
grand larceny and a third with re
ceiving stolen property in connec
tion with a series of thefts of meat
from the L. S. Briggs, Inc., plant.
The larceny charges name John
O. Deese, 20, of Seat Pleasant, Md..'
a truck driver for the company, and
Joe Semo, 47, of the 1300 block of
C street NH„ a garage attend?-*.
Charged with receiving stolen
property is Morris Slate, 39, of the
600 block of A street N.E., a grocer.
Deese and Semo were arrested
Thursday on a warrant charging
them with the theft of eight hams.
Police said they found 50 pounds
of bacon and 11 hams at the C
street address.
Slate, who allegedly bought meat
stolen from the firm, was arrested
Friday. According to police, 13
hams were recovered from the store
in which he does business in South
east Washington.
The defendants were granted a
continuance by Judge George D.
Neilson until October 10. They are
free under $500 bond each.
Police said thefts of meat, in
cluding ham that cost $1.06 aj
pound wholesale, had been noted'
at the Briggs plant for several
months.
formal i. u. upenmg
Set for Next Sunday
While classes in undergraduate
studies begin tomorrow at Catholic
University, the formal opening of'
the academic year will be signalized
at 11 am. next Sunday when the
mass of the Holy Ghost is celebrated
in the National Shrine of the Im
maculate Conception on the campus.
The Rev. Dr. Louis A. Arand, S. S.,
president of the divinity college, will
be the celebrant and the sermon will
be given by the Righff Rev. P. J.
McCormick, rector of the university.
More than 4,000 students reg
istered last week for the fall term
at the university. To handle the
mass of students, the gymnasium
was roped off into sections instead
3f using McMahon Hall where
previous registrations have been
held. Students taking graduate
work will register next week for
classes opening Saturday.
To handle more students, the uni
versity officials are negotiating for
establishment of a branch of the
school at Port Belvoir. If plans go
through, military and civilian per
sonnel at the fort will be able to
take undergraduate courses in
engineering and graduate work in
| engineering and biology.
PIANOS I
NEW AND REBUILT
BALLARD
1300 G. ST. N.W. NA. 0414-15
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
BALLARD, 1300 G ST. N.W,
REFINISH YOUR FLOORS
The MODERN Way
RENTALS ADAMS'
SALES
REPAIRS '575
Ask your neighbor about SERVICE COAT
Quick drying, long lasting finish, only 3.75 gal.
Buy direct from the manufacturer
MODERN FLOORS 2431 18th St. n.w.
TO AND
(FROM
SCHOOL?
FALL
VACATION?

TO THE

BIG
i
i GAMES?
i

SimMIIMMMHIIMItUGSGMmiMI
I
!
»
»
»
!
>
I BUSINESS
9
TRIP?
9
»

t
• MM
| | 1^ I » jffi
t
N O WONDER so many
people are planning trips by
Greyhound this Fall. With
fares so amazingly low, with
service so frequent and de
pendable, ’most everyone
wants to get out and enjoy
America’s lovely Autumn
highways. Why not join
them aboard one of those
big, smooth - riding Grey
hounds—and have fun/
BALTIMORE_$ .75
SCRANTON_4.55
BOSTON_i—6.65
NORFOLK _3.70
NEWPORT NEWS —3.50
PHILADELPHIA_Z-15
PITTSBURGH_5.35
BUFFALO_7.35
RICHMOND_2.00
FREDERICKSBURG .95c
LEONARDTOWN —1.15
PETERSBURG __ —2.40
* I
MIAMI__-$14.75
ST. PETERSBURG--13.55
NEW ORLEANS —14.20
HAGERSTOWN_2.05
FREDERICK_1.40
LOS ANGELES_43.10
ANNAPOLIS_85c
PARKERSBURG_6.20
DENVER_26.90
BRISTOL_6.20
CLARKSBURG_4.95
ROANOKE_3.45
rim U. I. Tu. Big EXTKA Saving* an Bound Trip Ticket*
GREYHOUND TERMINAL
1110 New York Ave. N.W.
Phone NA. 8000. Blue Ridge Phone ME. 1523
I, b
Baldwin Joins Staff
Of Episcopal High
Christopher C. Baldwin, jr„ form
er chief of the textile branch, office
of the Quartermaster General, has
joined the staff of Episcopal High
School, Alexandria, as director of
alumni and parent relations.
Announcement of the appoint
ment was made yesterday by Acting
Principal Richard P. Williams. Mr.
*
Baldwin was graduated from Epis
copal High In 1917. After attending
Yale University and the University
of Virginia, he entered the cotton
textile business, becoming a partner
in a New York firm. He entered the
Army in 1942, leaving in 1946 as a
colonel.
Among his duties at the school
will be the direction of the drive to
provide (1,360,000 for endownment,
physical improvement and enlarge
ment of the faculty.
AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE
and all Mi ef (muranca
Including LIFE
REALTORS
(aver 81 rnn' axparianaa)
781 10th St. N.W. NA. 0788
is Best! I
,0 ELIMINATE WORK and WORRY! I
Nationally Known Quality jj
Equipment Available Note! J#
JANITROL GAS-FIRED $
BOILER $475 00 AUTOMATIC GAS |jf
Installed . . . Depending WATER HEATERS fj
an Site. (Storage Type) f'
JANITROL GAS 30-GAL. RUUD '•>
CONVERSION BURNER 51 eg m ||
,.,n„ 30.caL: rex I
Standard Conditions. •<„
6-CU.-FT. SERVEL GAS $'6,0° I
REF$R288 00TOR 30'GAlr' MER,0N I
DELUXE GAS RANGES *
TAPPAN_$179.50 NO DOWN PAYMENT | >
"AR™iuLed]37-75 5T0M0P^IS I
Value! Regular 15.00 I
26 INCH I
PULLMAN I
CASES
10.49
Lucky purchase! Beautiful leather
bound aeroplane cases with de luxe
rayon linings, elastic pockets and
tie down ribbons! Twin locks and
leather handles! Choice of colors!
Regular 11 JO, 18-inch £ IA
* OVERNITE CASES 0.49
Regular 12JO, 21-inch M A
* WEEKEND CASES 1.49
Regular 19.95, 21-inch 44 AC
9 WARDROBE CASES 11.93
Sensationally Priced!
Men’s 17.50 24-In. Leather
GLADSTONE BAGS
The Ideal traveling bag!
Holds suits, 'shirts, ties, M _
hose, etc. Cloth lined! ^ ^ Bf
Extra pockets and divi- ■ ■
der! 2 straps! ■ ■ • m mm
Sale
Mm’s 35.00
PIGSKIN
2-SUITER
$24'°°
Rich-looking saddle color pigskin leather two
suiters that hold your clothes neatly pressed!
Extra pockets! Cloth lined! Outstanding value!
Reduced From 22.50
Special Hard Fibre
PACKING TRUNKS
15.45
A neat trunk that will hold every
thing! Fibre bound! Removable
tray! 3-ply veneer frame! Leather
handles!
Special!
Hinson
18-inch
10.95
CLUB
BAGS
5.88
Sale!
I Leather
BRIEF
CASES
3.95
Special! Men’s Regular 22.50
24-inch Leather Bound
2-Siiiter Cases
Genuine leather! Full size! Black
or brown! Just right for students!
A great value!
t ■" 1111
# All Luggage Initialed Free!
• All Luggage—Plus Tax
Open Weekdays, 9 A M. to 7 P.M.
Saturdayt 9 to 9
0
* '

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