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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 31, 1947, Image 17

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Miss Crawford Loves Sadly
Once More in 'Daisy Kenyon’
By Jay Carmody
There is no sign of it yet, but the day may come when no woman
will want to be the other woman. When, and if, this time arrives, the
movies will have only themselves and Joan Crawford to blame. In pic
ture after picture, they show her suffering tragedy after tragedy, indig
nity after indignity, and pang after pang because she has the atrocious
iiiriement to love outside the foul line. If ever there was a game with
only one loser, Miss Crawford is it,'
but she comes right back to suffer
another defeat In “Daisy Kenyon,”
which opened at the Capitol today.
It was established long ago in the
book marts and at the movie box
office that there is a large and loyal
audience for this sad spectacle.
Watching Miss Crawford suffer has
become either a national pastime
or an unbreakable habit and as
repetitions go, "Daisy Kenyon' is
probably as good as any. It gives
Miss Craw’ford the full workout and,
what is more, it gives her two such
spirited collaborators as Dana
Andrews and Henry Fonda.
This, of course, makes “Daisy
Kenyon” a kind of de luxe edition
of Miss Crawford's enduring story.
* * * *
Those book review page cnarcs
which show how the public’s taste
is from week to week indicate that
the hammock and boudoir readers
were highly vulnerable to Elizabeth
Janeway’s novel.
There must be many others, how
ever. who waited fcrr the movie
version by 20th Century-Fox and
its adapter, David Hertz. For these,
it may be well to mention that Miss
Crawford's Daisy is a career girl
who lives down in Greenwich Vil
lage. Her address is Twelfth street
and her telephone number is Chelsea
2-something. It and she are both
busy numbers, and while this sounds
as if it were written in ironic malice,
it is merely a plain statement of
"Daisy Kenyon.”
There are two men in Daisy’s life
and they keep her so busy she al
most never has time to practice her
profession which is illustrating
magazine stories, probably tales Just
like her own.
One of these men is dynamic Dan
OMara. a brilliant, brittle, rich and
disillusioned young lawyer with one
of those soft, sentimental Irish
cores. Dan is married, has two
children, lives on Park avenue,
knows Winchell and Leonard Lyons,
in fact, has everything but Daisy,
which is the only thing he really
wants.
THIS leaves mm in a ncuiuwv,
state in which he gives her the full
back-street treatment, a casual call
for a quick kiss and a hot cup of
coffee before rushing off to the
duplex luxury of Park avenue.
It never occurs to her to question
their love until Fonda comes along.
He also is psychoneurotic, but at
least he is a new one, and his dis
orders have at least a more admir
able origin. They were born of the
war and the loss of his adored wife
in an automobile mishap. Unlike
Andrews, he remains, gentle and
soft spoken and when he mentions
love, it is a warm, wistful whisper.
Tne contest between the two men
throws Daisy off stride and before
she knows it, she is married to
Fonda and whisked oft to Cape Cod,
where he is going back to his old
business of designing sail and fish
ing boats.
* * * *
In the pure, clean air of the Cape,
you would think any woman would
drop the yearning to be an “other
"DAISY KENYON," * 20th Century Fox
Picture produced end directed by Otto
Preminger, screenplay by David Herts from
the novel by Elizabeth Janeway. At the
Capitol.
THE CAST.
Delay Kenyon_Joan Crawford
Dan O'Mara_Dana Andrews
Peter -Henry Fonda
Lncile O’Mara_Ruth Warrick
Mary Angelus_ Martha Stewart
Rosamund _Peggy^Ann Garner
Marie _Connie Marshall
Coverly- -Nicholas Joy
Lucile's Attorney_ Art Baker
Attorney_Robert Karnes
Mervyn_John Davidson
Marsha_ Victoria Horne
Judge --Charles Meredith
Dan's Attorney_ Roy Roberts
Thompson-Griff Barnett
Dino Tito Vuolo
Walter Wlnchell_Himself
Leonard Lyons_Himself
woman,” but it is rather a disease
with poor Daisy.
Before any one can, or -at least
does, say Jack Robinson, the original
triangle has become a quadrangle.
The three principals, who are
constantly meeting in restrained
discussion of their problem at the
Stork Club and other places, make
It understood they are the “civilized”
type. Being civilized means that in
stead of hitting each other over the
heads with brandy bottles or Sher
man Billingsley’s lethal chairs, they
talk with amiable bewilderment
about their emotional mess. Also,
they talk a terribly long time,
especially for any customer who
happens to know from Fonda’s first
appearance who will end up as Mr.
Daisy Kenyon.
♦ * * *
It must be said for Otto Prem
inger’s direction, and the acting of
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing
Stage.
National—"I Remember Mama”;
8:30 pm.
Screen.
Ambassador—“My Wild Irish
Rose ”; 1:15, 3:20, 5:30, 7:35 and 10
p.m. •
Capital—“Daisy Kenyon”; 11 a.m.
1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:10 p.m. and 1 am.
Stage shows: 1:05, 3:55, 6:40, 9:30
p.m. and 12:15 am.
Columbia—“Green Dolphin Street”;
11 a.m., 1:35, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35 p.m.
and 12:15 a.m.
Hippodrome—“I Know Where I’m
Going”; 2:15, 4:05, 5:55, 7:45 and
9:30 pm.
Keiths — “Tycoon”; 10:30 am.,
12:45, 3, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45 pm. and
12:15 am.
liUWC- X lie VJiCttt 1\GLL. xieuiuci. ,
rt:35 a.m., 1:40, 3:45, 5:55, 7:45 and
9:40 p.m.
Metropolitan — “The Fabulous
Texan”; 11:20 am., 1:25, 3:30, 5:35,
7:40 and 9:45 p.m. “The Upturned
Glass’; 12:25 a.m.
Palace—“Good News”; 11:15 am.,
1:20, 3:25, 5:40, 7:55 and 10:15 pm.
and 12:30 a.m .
Pix—'“All Laugh Show”; 2, 5:10
and 8:25 p.m. "Good Girls Go to
Paris”; 1:05 a.m.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts;
continuous from 10:15 a.m.
Warner—"My Wild Irish Rose”;
11 a.m., 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50
pm. and 12:10 am.
CAREER GIRL—That’s what
Joan Crawford is in “Daisy
Kenyon,’’ and one with mis
fortunes at that. The picture
is today’s new arrival on the
Capitol screen.
the cast of "Daisy Kenyon” that
they play It to the emotional hilt.
If any of tne stars has the slightest
misgiving about the 6tory being the
greatest romance since Tristam and
Isolde, he never betrays it. This
sort of devotion to duty gives little
chance for the introduction of
comedy into the Capitol’s picture
which leaves it, well, say, inexorable.
Perhaps, however, it will make
other women think.
* * * *
A stageful of lively ones headed
by comics Smith and Dale bulwarks
Miss Crawford at the Capitol this
week. The bill starts off with a
spirited overture by Sam Jack Kauf
man and soloist, Kay DeWit, who do
a comprehensive run-through of
1947’s mo6t popular music. It is
rounded out by Adele Duvall, Sunny
Sparks, and Vince and Gloria Hay
dock.
Hollywood:
Among the Best
And Worst of
The Year
By Bob Thomas
Let’s ring out the old year with
the annual selection of its hlgfc
lights and low points In Hollywood
Here’s how 1947 looked to this re
porter:
Biggest headline news: "Houa*
Un-American Committee hearings.
Best picture: "Gentleman’s Agree
ment.”
Newsiest romance: Lana Turner
Tyrone Power.
Biggest flop: “Monsieur Verdoux.’
Most important industry news:
British 75 per cent tax on United
States films.
Most exciting film: “Boomerang.’
Best English Importation: "Great
Expectations.”
Most entertaining picture: “Perils
of Pauline.”
Biggest disappointment: “Forever
Amber.”
Best artistic film: "Mourning Be
comes Electrs.”
Best male star performances:
Ronald Colman In “A Double Life”;
Gregory Peck in “Gentleman’!
Agreement” and "The Paradine
Case”; William Powell in "Life With
Father”; Tyrone Power in "Night
mare Alley”; Michael Redgrave in
“Mourning Becomes Electra.”
Best female star performances:
Joan Crawford in "Possessed”; Betty
Hutton (that's right) in "Perils ol
Pauline”; ‘Dorothy McGuire in
“Gentleman’s Agreement”; Rosa
lind Russell in "Mourning Becomes
TSee HOLLYWOOD, Page B-5.)
»
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&ioAiwy$a&0c& beat's 1
MIONIGHT SHOW It
The Fountain of Youth is bubbling joyfully
for thousands of movie-lovers! Young folks
feel like dancing in the aisles. Old folks feel
like young folks. "Good News” is a tonic in
* Technicolor! "The Pic Of The Week! An
^ enchanting film!” says Louella Parsons.
AMUSEMENTS AMUSEMENTS
I RKO KEITH’S I
DOORS OPEN tO: 15 OPPO. U. S. TREASURY ON I8TH ST.
mis THE WORD fi
things from
which m pictures are made!
SO it stays for
SecorfdWeek!
with
NEff YEAR’S EVE
MIDNIGHT SHOW TONIGHT
I
COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR
with SIR CEDRIC HARDWICKE * JUDITH ANDERSON
JAMES GLEASON • ANTHONY QUINN |*o
MAJORIE m
JIBBOTT • COSTELLO • MAIN
I Ck J W,*TFUL WIDOW OF WACOM OAF
ADVERTISEMENT.
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freaifflm/A
_ MIDNIGHT
*|* SHOW TONIGHT!
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INC TMtATM GUILD maria
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Brea.; $1.20, *3. $3.60, $4.20. $4.6$.
Mat*. I $1.20. $2.40. $3, $3.0$.
SEAT SALE MW
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MIDNIGHT SHOW TONIGHT f t
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*» RUTH WARRICK • MARTHA STEWART
PEGGY ANN GARNER-CONNIE MARSHALL
Produead and Directed by OTTO PREMINGER
The Broadway Comedians
JOE CHARLIE
SMITH & DALE
with WILLIAM ROYALL & JOE CUNEFF
ADE DUVAL*SUNNY SPARKS-VINCE & GLORIA HAYDOCK
Sam.Jaek Kaufman t Capitol Oreh. prosonts 1947 Hit Parade with Kay DeWitt
Starts
TODAY
Rosamund JOHN
Ska was tha woman...LOVED
Pamela KELLINO
Sho was tha woman WHO LOVED |
'THE UPTURNED GLASS’
A Univereal-Intemational Reteas*
When JAMES MASON uses \|
love as a weapon, someone gets hurt...
and someone gets loved!
-
LAST TIMES TODAY.... LAST SHOWING TONITE A 9:45
| m BILL’ELLIOTT*‘The FABULOUS TEXAN
f
V -
The most musical
musical aver, aver I
Including: Q
•MY WHO I8SH »OS£"
•N THE EVENING
a »Y THE MOONIIGHT"
At> “WIU YOU LOVE ME \,
• W DECEMBE*" (1
}d "A UHIE BIT Of HEAVEN"
V 'BY THE UGHT Of THE
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I -MY EVENING STAT*
■MY NEllirS BLUE EYES"
'MOTHS* MArHffF*
"DEAR OLD DONEGAL" ]
•wee rose or wliarneW
nr PM DREAMING, Vjf
LET ME DKAMfp
THE REST Of THE'
WORLD GO BY1*
with an ear for a tune j;
and an eye for a J
v wild Irish Rose! •
' &K5!® !
1 ARLENE DAHL* ANDREA KING • ALAN HALE d
I /->SGEORGE TOBIAS • GEORGE OBRIENlBEN BLUE - SARA V
M "-"J-"0' P) iTi#_ _.
JOE McDOAKES COMEDY
MERRIE MELODIES CARTOON
WARNER-PATHE NEWS
i' *

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