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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 30, 1949, Image 3

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: Final Senate Action
On Labor Measure
Is Scheduled Today
8y J. A. O'Leary
The Senate is all set to dispose
of the controversial labor issue
today, without repealing the Taft
Hartley law, and move on to the
North Atlantic defense pact.
If Senator Taft, Republican, of
Ohio suceeds, as most observers
expect, in writing the rest of his
amendments into the labor meas
ure, it will look so much like the
present Taft-Hartley Act that or
ganized labor and the Truman
administration are ready to aban
don it.
They made it clear yesterday
that they would rather leave the
original law as it is for another
year and make it a 1950 campaign
issue than accept the substitute
of a Taft-led coalition, which re
tains the salient features of the
Taft-Hartley Act.
Will Seek to Defeat Taft.
Labor leaders were already pre
paring to go after Senator Taft's
scalp when he runs for re-election
next year, and his apparent vic
tory in the current labor bill
fight easily will make Ohio the
main ring in the 1950 congres
sional elections.
Seeking to carry out President
Truman’s promise to labor last
year to repeal Taft-Hartley, ad
ministration Senators started out
with a bill which did just that by
reinstating the Wagner Act with
a few modifications.
Senator Taft offered a substi
tute in two parts. The battle
was really decided two days ago
when the Senate adopted the first
half. 50 to 40. That nailed into
the administration measure spe
cific authority for the President
to use either injunctions, or plant
seizure, or both, to head off na
tional emergency strikes.
Soon after 2 o’clock this after
noon the Senate will vote on the
remaining half of the Taft plan,
which put into the administra
tion bill many other major fea
tures of the original Taft-Hartley
Law without material changes.
These include: Continuation of
the ban on closed-shop contracts,
but permitting the union shop;
use of temporary Injunctions
against unfair labor practices
ban on mass picketing, keeping
the Federal Mediation Service in
dependent, and exempting man
agement from compulsory bar
gaining with foremen.
Labor Leaden Criticize Bill.
Without waiting for this second
half of the Taft plan to be voted
on, spokesmen for the CIO and
AFL left no doubt yesterday that
Tuesday’s adoption of the injunc
tion weapon makes the bill un
acceptable to them.
Assuming the Senate will pass
the Taft version late today, the
administration has two ways of
letting the bill die. House lead
ers could pigeonhole the Senate
measure, or pass it and let Presi
dent Truman veto it. The voting
to date shows the Taft supporters
would not have two-thirds required
to override a veto.
Senator Taft struck back yes
terday at a letter to Majority
Leader Lucas from AFL President
William Green stating that adop
tion of the injunction feature
made it a waste of time to try to
make the remainder of the bill
more “palatable.”
“Mr,. Green is undertaking to
vote the Senate bill before it
passes,” said Senator Taft.
The Ohioan contended a veto
based on the injunction provision
would be untenable because ad
ministration spokesmen have
argued that the President already
has general constitutional power
to seek injunctions if a strike en
danger^ public health or safety.
3 Senators Sponsor Amendment.
There may* be some last-minute
efforts to modify the Taft plan
before the final vote today, but
this was not certain.
One of the pending amend
ments, sponsored by three New
England Republicans, is designed
to prevent States from enforcing
stricter “right to work” laws than
the Federal law.
The three Senators are Bald
win of Connecticut, Saltonstall of
Massachusetts and Flanders of
Vermont.
Seventeen States, mostly in the
South and West, have laws re
stricting contracts that make
union membership a condition of
employment. The Taft bill does
not go as far as most of those
LOST.
BRINDLE BULL TERRIER, brown-and
white, small dog; vie. Mall, Sat.; children's
pet; reward. OW 7.324,_—30
CAT, black, male, white spot on throat,
scar on one rear foot: vicinity Conn, and
Vann Ness, late Sun. Reward. WO. 4455.
, ___J_—30
, COCKER SPANIEL, black-and-tan. male.
'Shawn": on Lee hwy. near Centerville.
Va. Phone Fairfax ll-J-2._—1
DIAMOND RING, family heirloom, cluster
with 2 black stones in center: Friday, vie.
n w._Reward. AD. 1190. _—2_
DOG. small black female, strayed from
829 11 th at. n.e. LI. 3-1375. Reward—1
EARRING—Silver, flower design, semi
precious stones. 9 petals, downtown. Wed.
Reward. Sentiment value only. Bo* 1R7-S.
Star. _2*__
GERMAN SHEPHERD—Female, black and
tan, 8 wks. old. vie. of Green Meadows.
Hyatts.. Md, Reward._UN. 4182. —2
GLASSES—Pair gold-rimmed glasses, green
xipper case; vie. R. I. and Conn. avea.
B.w. EM. 3373 or EX. 7760. Ext. 221.
Tadvs black leather wallet—
Contain, sum of money and pvt. papers.
In Hecht s Dept. Store. June 29. Owner
from out-of-town. Reward. CaU TR. 3929.
___—2
LADY’S WATCH—White gold. Tuesday
night. Reward. QE. 2635.*
LADIES' GOLD WRIST WATCH. Waltham.
Sat.. June 25. in vicinity of Giant Food
Market. Kennedy at. n.w. Reward. Box
168-3. Star,_ 30*
PURSE—Brown leather. June 28, between
l«th Euclid n.w. and 4000 Cathedral n.w.
Liberal reward. Call EM. 1888.
SPRINGER SPANIEL, black and while. 4
mos. old. vicinity of PatTllngton. CH.
8816. _—30
WALLET, lady’s, red urgently needed.
Liberal reward. OE. 5660. —30
WATCH, gold open face, lost In vie. of
Arkansas ave.: initials R. H. M , Jr. Re
warev RA. 1271,_—30
WATCH, pink gold. 6 diamonds, chain
stiap with 6 diamonds; in cab to and
from Rittenhouse to the vie. of 16th and
S st n.w. en 26th. Reward. RA. 6572.
_—30
WRIST WATCH, ladies’, diamond, gray
band, sentimental value, reward, lost Frl
day. AD. 0269._—30
LARGE BUNCH OF KEYS. In nearby
Maryland or District, Wednesday morning
Reward. CaU WA. 7062 after 6. —2
_____
(OUND, ENGLISH BULLDOG — Mato,
South Arlington. CaU CH. 6814. _
MOUNTED POLICEMAN’S HORSE INJURES GIRL AT ANA
COSTIA—Miss Joan Sexton, 17, Is shown as she fell to the ground
after being trampled by a horse ridden by Park Policeman
Powhatan Daniels. The policeman was dispersing a crowd at
the Anacostia swimming pool yesterday. The horse stepped on
Miss Sexton’s right foot, fracturing two toes Numerous fights
broke out between colored and white youths before police man
aged to clear the area around the swimming pool, which has
been the center of trouble since Negroes began using it last week.
—Star Staff Photo by Elwood Baker.
I — -.- - - ■ ——
laws, but would permit the State
] laws to govern.
The New Englanders said they
wanted to make those laws con
form to the Federal version. They
are concerned about the possible
migration of industry to the 17
States because of their labor laws.
Dinner Sponsors Seeking
Man fo Introduce Barkley
ly tha Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S. C., June 30.—
Sponsors of a dinner here tomor
row night at which Vice President
Barkley is the scheduled speaker
are looking for someone to intr
duce him.
Dr. W. L. Pressly of Due West,
the nation's 1948 family doctor
| of the year, yesterday declined to
introduce the Vice President be
cause of "increasing political
agitation” surrounding the dinner.
Former Gov. Ransome J. Wil
liams, handling arrangements for
the $15-a-plate affair, had no
immediate comment.
Gov. Thurmond has said he will
not attend* because Mr. Barkley
will be appearing in a political
capacity rather than as Vice
President.
Senators Maybank and Johns
ton of South Carolina -say they
plan to attend. None of the State’s
six Representatives will be on
hand, they say.
The dinner will be a segregated
affair, in that no Negroes have
bought tickets.
Mr. Barkley has said he will
speak to "whoever is there” in
reply to questions on his attitude
about speaking at a segregated
meeting.
Hickenlooper Ends
First Phase of Case
•y th« AueciaUd Pro*
' *■ -
Senator Hickenlooper, Republi
can, of Iowa today ended the
first phase of his case against
the Atomic Energy Commission
which he has charged with "in
credible mismanagement.”
Senator Hickenlooper an
nounced to the Joint Senate
House Atomic Energy Committee, ;
which has been hearing the
charges, that hi feels he can pro
ceed no further publicly until the;
committee has acted in closed ses
sion on some other aspects of
his case.
He referred to his charges of
commission laxity in security n at- ■
ters, which the committee has
said he must present behind
closed doors; some international
phases of atomic energy opera
tions, and "certain more or less
technical matters.”
In the meantime, the commis
sion will present what Chairman
David E. Lilienthal called an "ac
counting of our stewardship” be
ginning next Wednesday.
"We will make this succinct,
brief and yet comprehensive as
possible,” Mr. Lilienthal said. "It
should not take many days.”
-*
Bus Driver to Retire
Archie Wells, 60, of 910 North
Stuart street. Arlington, tomorrow
will be the first bus operator of,
the Washington, Virginia St Mary
land Coach Co. to retire under aj
company sponsored pension plan.!
r .11
Pools
(Continued From First Pace.)
tion Board has permission to con
duct the free periods in the morn
ings.
The Recreation Board has with
drawn its personnel so far only
from the McKinley pool, because
Negroes have begun to use it.
The Recreation Board will con
tinue to report to other GS1
pools as long as segregation is in
effect, according to Milo Christian
sen, recreation superintendent.
The trouble at the Anacostia
pool started around 3 p.m. yester
day. While about six colored men
and about a dozen white men
were swimming in the pool, a
crowd of both races began to
gather outside.
Charles Watson, 21. colored, of
1107 Sumner road S.E., said he
was chased out of the pool by the
white men. He tore his foot on
barbed wire in climbing the fence
around the pool.
A mounted policeman, Powha
tan Daniels, was called and began
forcing the crowd of white men
back, while other policemen herded
a colored group away from the
pool.
Girl Tells of Injury.
Miss Sexton, a senior at Ana
costia High School, said she went
over to the pool area to “see what
was going on.” The first warning
she had that she was in danger
was when she turned around and
saw the policeman riding his horse
through the crowd.
‘‘He was pretty close when T first
saw him,” she explained today
from her Casualty Hospital bed.
"I tried to run but before I started
running the horse trampled me. I
guess the policeman saw me and
thought I would get out of his
way. But, I didn’t move fast
enough.”
Miss Sexton was. knocked to the
ground by the horse. A photo
graph of the incident showed the
mounted policeman with his whip
raised. In describing what hap
, pened, the girl said she “looked up
from the ground and saw him
whipping the horse as though to
get him to move.”
Capt. Mark Raspberry, head'of
the park police, was at the scene
of the trouble. He said the injury,
to Miss Sexton was accidental
and that Pvt. Danials had called
on the girl at, the hospital to
apologize.
He said Pvt. Daniels was ordered
to ride through the crowd to dis
perse the gathering. The horse
brushed against Miss Sexton, he
stated, knocking her to the ground
and then stepping on her right
foot, breaking two toes.
Three men were involved in a
fight concerning the distribution
of handbills printed by the Young
Progressives, urging biracial use
of the pool. Rocks were thrown
by some in the crowd.
Donald M. Long. 20, of 5424
Thirty-second street S.E., a stu
dent, was- charged with distrib
uting handbills. He elected to
forfeit $5 collateral.
Joseph Jackanow, 30, of 3547
Kanawah street N.W.. also was
charged with distributing hand
bills. He did not have $5. but was
balled out later by three young
women.
Jackanow at first refused to talk
to reporters but later said he and
Long were distributing leaflets
when an older man struck
at him. When they were put in
the wagon to be taken to No. 11
LORDLY WASHABLE
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precinct station, the man struck
Long, he said, cutting his eye.
The third man involved in this
fracas was listed by police as
Thomas R. English, 39. of 3000
Thirtieth street S E„ who said he
was a social worker. He also for
feited t5 on a disorderly conduct
charge.
A 16-year-old colored boy of
I the 500 block of Twenty-fifth
place N.E. was charged with dis
orderly conduct and released to his
parents for apeparance in Juvenile
Court.
| Also charged with disorderly
conduct was Toussaint P. Pierce,
23, colored, of 2534 Sheridan road
| S. E. He posted $5 collateral for
an appearance in Municipal Court
today.
Those injured included Michael
Fitzurka, 16, of 2000 Ridge place
S.E., who said a colored boy bit
him under his left eye. and Park
Policeman Julius Campbell, 32,
; colored, of 920 T street N.W.. who
was bruised by a stone which
| struck his right arm
An unidentified blond white
woman, apparently a sympathizer
with the Young Progressives, was
escorted from the pool area by
police, after she had incurred the
anger of a group of white men.
About 100 persons foljowed her
from the park onto Sixteenth
street S.E. She became fright
ened and began to run, with the
crowd in pursuit. To elude the
crowd she ran into a home in
the 1700 block of Sixteenth
street S.E.
Police took her away in a patrol
wagon for her safety, after the
owner of the house, who refused
to give her name, started scream
ing that the woman was "trying
to take my baby."
in anotner incident Mary Ann
Davis, 14, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. William Davis, 1248 U street
S.E., was struck and pushed to
the ground by a group of teeiv-age
colored boys and girls as she was
stalking on Nichols avenue near
bar home.
The girl told reporters the col
ored youths jostled her, then one
struck her and she was forced
back against a grocery door
at 1926 Nichols avenue S.E. A
clerk in the store opened the door
to admit her as the police arrived.
No arrests were made.
Members of the Young Progres
sives. which has been responsible
for the handbill distribution at
the Anacostia pool, were scheduled
to meeting with Irving C. Root,
superintendent of National Cap
ital Parks, today to discuss the
pools segregation issue.
Gordon M. Atherholt, president
of the Northwest Council of Cit
izens' Associations, on Tuesday
made public a letter which the
council had addressed to the Dis
trict Recreation Board on June
13, requesting that the rule of
segregation be maintained.
After citing reports showing the
greater incidence of tuberculosis
and syphilis among colored resi
dents of the District, the letter
stated:
"It is the position of the North
west Council of Citizens' Associa
tions that among the foremost
duties of the Government of the
District of Columbia is the pro
tection of the health of its citizens
and prevention of the spread of
readily communicable and trans
missable diseases."
Bookie Gets Wrong Number
INDIANAPOLIS. June 30 <&).—
A typographical error on a busi
ness card cost a horse bookie a lot
of business today. The bookie
must have moved and notified his
patrons that his new telephone
number was Franklin 2134 He
couldn't have done much worse
That's the number of the Indiana
Council of Churches.
WHY NOT?
It costs no more
to park at tko
Capital Garage
New York Avenue
ASK THE MAN
WHO OWNS ONE
i
raaoOTs !
nit m itmit n. w.
J
Pan-Laconians End
Convention Here
The Pan- Laconian Federation
of the United 5u.es and Canada
which concluded it* five-da* cor.
renuon here Iasi night adapted
a resolution directing the organ -
tsauon to carry out a program
of aid for tuberculosis and other
medical center* m Laneorua
Greece.
Another resolution adopted
called for the Executive Board to
appoint a committee to organise
an educational soc.ai and athletic
program for Laconian youth m
this country.
The convention, held at the
Hotel Sutler, ended with a fare
well ball and Greek night
These supreme officer* were re
elected C M Bucuvalas of Bos
ton. president Andrew Fassea*
Chicago, first rice president
Peter L Doums HM Sixteenth
street NW. Washington, second
rice president Michael Gram
mas Boston secreUry, and Peter
Diamond. Detroit treasurer Louis
Nikolas of Chicago was elected
counsellor to succeed James P
Iatropouios. also of Chicago
Michael Patnnakos of New
York was elected a governor to
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