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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 04, 1949, Image 56

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Groomed Links in U. S.
No Handicap, British
Walker Cuppers Say
ty tb« Associated Press
NEW YORK, Aug. 4.—Britain’s
Walker Cup golfers don’t expect
any trouble adjusting themselves
to America’s thick-carpeted, tree
lined courses and other unfamiliar
playing conditions.
‘‘I think the boys should feel
right at home in a few days,” said
Comdr. J. A. S. Carson, manager
of the team that is here to try
to wrest the international trophy
from the Americans August 19-20.
"Oh, no, your courses shouldn’t)
bother us,” added big Samuel Max
(call me Max) McCready, the
British Amateur champion who
will lead the assault against Uncle
Sam’s hand-picked amateurs.
The Walker Cup matches will
be played over Winged Foot at
Mamaroneck, N. Y„ a layout that
bears little resemblance to the
barren, dune-dotted and wind
swept championship courses of the
British Isles.
Willie Tumesa, the United States
National Amateur champion, said
on his recent return from England
that a golfer needs a full month
to readjust his game to the dif
ferent conditions.
Greens Could Bother Britons'.
“Normally, that might be true,"
explained Carson, who is also sec
retary of Britain’s reigning links
body, “but our players have been
working out on park courses and
these are a lot like your own.
‘The championship courses are
seaside affairs with no trees and
much sand and wind. If our boys
played on them all the time the
changeover would be difficult."
Three members of the 10-man
British team, which arrived in
New York yesterday, have played
in America before.
Capt. Laddie Lucas and Cecil
Ewing were members of the 1936
team that bowed to the United
States at Pine Valley in Clemen
ton, N. J., 9-0. Lucas was unable to
compete in the matches, however,
because of illness.
McCready, a 6-foot, 200-pound
Irishman, taught student RAF
pilots at Maxwell Field, in Mont
gomery, Ala., from 1940 to 1942,
and, he says, played courses in
Alabama and Georgia.
“The greens are the only thing
that should trouble us at first—
they have a different nap,” he
said.
After Turnesa Again.
McCready eliminated Frank
Stranahan in the quarter-finals
and Willie Turnesa in the final
en route to the British Amateur
crown at Portmarnock earlier this
year.
He is anxious for another crack
at Turnesa in the United States
Amateur August 20 to September
3 at Rochester, N. Y., and, he adds
quickly, “with the same result.”
The visitors planned to rest to
day and take their first shot at
the Winged Foot course tomorrow.
Other members are Ernest Mill
ward, Gerald Micklem, Joseph
Carr, James Bruen, Kenneth
Thom, Ronald White and Arthur
Perowne.
It’s regarded as one of the
stoutest Walker Cup teams ever
assembled by the British. Since
1322, when the series started, the
United States has won 10 and
lost only once—in 1938.
Six American Neimen,
Left in Eastern Meet
•y th« Associated Presi
SOUTH ORANGE, N. J., Aug.
4.—Six Americans and two for
eigners were left in the field of the
men’s singles quarter final round
today in the 23d annual Eastern
grass courts tennis championship
at the Orange Lawn Tennis Club.
Eric Sturgess of South Africa,
seeded No. 1 among the foreign
players, defeated Sam Match of
Los Angeles, 6—3, 6—3, yesterday
in a third round match.
Miniature Felisimo Ampon of
the Philippine Islands entered the
quarter-final round in a surprise
victory over third-seeded Amer
ican Vic Seixas of Philadelphia.
3—6, 6—3, 6—,-4.
Top-Seeded Bill Talbert of New
York was one of the six United
States survivors, defeating Jack
Tuero of New Orleans, 3—6, 6—1,
6—2.
Herbie Flam of Beverly Hills,
Calif., defeated Julius Heldman of
Wilmington, Calif., 6—2, 6—1.
Fourth-Seeded Gamar Mulloy
of Coral Gables, Fla., did it the
hard way, defeating Hugh Stew
art of Los Angeles, 21—19, 6—1.
Art Larsen of San Francisco,
seeded No. 7, was carried into
extra games before eliminating
Jim Brink of Seattle, Wash.,
6—4, 11—9.
Sid Schwartz of New York re
mained in the field by defeating
Grant Golden of Wilmette, 111.,
6— 4, 4 6, 6—3.
Earl H. Cochell of San Fran
cisco, Calif., who flew from Europe
to play, conquered Richard Savitt,
East Orange, N. J., 10—12, 6—4,
7— 5.__
Team With 35 Straight Wins Coached by Nat Scout \
By Bill Fuchs
THIRTY-FIVE straight vic
tories! One defeat.
A 5-foot-6-inch, 127-pound
power hitter, who is batting
.700 and has belted 10 home
runs.
A pair of pitchers who be
tween them have won 31 games.
A lineup that has as its weak
est hitter the smallest boy on
the club who can claim “only”
a 387 mark.
The Alexandria Recreation
Department championship, the
first-half title in the Boys’
Club of Washington Conference
and one leg on the second-half
title.
All of this applies to the Al
exandria Boys’ Club 14-years
old-and-under baseball team,
coached by Russell Herrick.
Herrick divides his time be
tween this labor of love and
beating the bushes for future
Washington Nats.
Gerald McRae is the .700
hitter.
“He is one of our smaller
boys,” says HeTick. “We have
one who has another year to go
in 14-and-under ball, but is 6
feet tall and weighs 150 pounds.
His name is Lester Mc
Menemen.”
McNenemen has power, too.
In batting practice prior to a
game with the Lancaster (Pa.)
Boys’ Club, he poled one over
the clubhouse, some 350 feet
from the plate at Stumpf Field,
Lancaster’s minor league sta
dium.
Herrick depends for most of
his pitching on Sonny Sheffield
and Olin Ginn. Sheffield has
won 18 games and Ginn 13.
“Ginn has pitched three no
hitters this year,” says Her
rick. “Sheffield doesn’t have
any no-hitters. He Just ‘strug
gles along’ on one and two
hitters. Both boys stand
about 5-9 and weigh about
140.”
The “weak” hitter is Capt.
Doug Flemming, a fiery second
baseman. His 17-year-old, 200
pound brother plays for Mun
cy, Ind., class D farm team of
the Cincinnati Reds.
That impressive 35-1 record
hasn’t come easily. The team,
sponsored by AMVETS Post
No. 10 of Alexandria, Just did
manage to pull three games
out of the fire.
“We were playing Takoma,”
recalls Herrick, "and trailing,
4-0, going into the last inning.
I think the boys were a little
overconfident. But they got
hold of themselves and batched
nine hits for eight runs, to
win, 8-4.
"And we had to go three
extra innings to beat Peoples’
Drug, 1-0. Skippy Evans
doubled and McMenemen made
Coach Russell Herrick of the Alexandria Boys’ Club, a stickler for details, is shown giving
pointers to Outfielder Skippy Evans (left) and Catcher Billy Norton.
___ ■ ... . .
it home from first, sliding in
under the catcher.
“And we just did beat Auto
Row in the first-half cham
pionship game, 2-1. We only
got two hits, but one of them
was McRae’s ninth homer of
the season. He hit that ball
from one Ellipse field to an
other.”
Alexandria's single loss came
from Auto Row Just the day be
fore yesterday, and responsible
for the setback was a 5-foot
9-inch 150-pound hurler named
Sonny Wise.
"Wise is the fastest thing
I’ve seen in boys’ club baseball,”
says Herrick. “He is faster and
has more on the ball than any
pitcher I have seen in high
school. We have no excuses for
losing that one."
As a result of the setback the
two clubs will play a best-two
out-of-three series for the Boys’
Club of Washington champion
ship.
Herrick, who keeps bearing
down on his boys and insists on
plenty of practice, won’t be at
the helm next year. Huntipg
material for the Nats’ extensive
rebuilding plans takes up too
much of his time and energy.
But he’s going to keep a
watchful eye on the progress of
some of these lads. After all,
the Nats could use a couple of
Sheffields and McRaes.
Lester McMenemen, a 6-footer and the tallest boy on the
team, and 5-foot-7-inch Gerald McRae compare batting stances.
McRae is the leading hitter with .700, while McMenemen is
swatting .580. —Star Staff Photos.
Indian Spring Crown
Golf Pairings Drawn
First-round matches in the In
dian Spring Club golf champion
ship are scheduled Sunday, with
pairings and starting times as
listed below.
Mel Shorey, the club pro, would
prefer players finding It possible
to play their matches before Sun
day to do so.
Championship Flight.
1:10. E. Ault vs. T. Mudd-R. O'Malley
vs. A. Dooley: 1:17. E. Fitzgerald vs.
J. Papier-H. Rudd vs. Dick Kane; 1:24.
J. Huntt vs. J. Bradford-D. Jackson vs.
K. Dietz: 1:31. D. Schattman vs. F.
Beiersdorf-D. Hevener vs. Dr. V. Young;
1:38, W. McFerren vs. G. Oottlieb-M.
Abrams vs. J. Price; 1:45. B. Ansell vs.
W. Wolf-L. Saxe vs. O. Thornton; 1:52.
J. Jekas vs. W. B. Robinson-B. Sharkey
vs. P. Dobrowolskl: 1:59. A. Welsberg
vs. C. M. Murpby-P. Burrows vs. B.
Rubin.
Other Flights.
9:05, B. Friedman vs. B. Wlllberg-T.
Zwigenhoft vs. B. Hayman: 9:12, G. Inoff
vs. Sid Simon-R. Greenberg vs. Dave Ru
bensteln: 9:19, S. Reiter v«. S. Rubenstein
M. Sellgman vs. Dr. S. Abramson; 9:28,
J. Kronman vs. 8. Cowan-H. Winston vs.
H. I. Cohen; 9:33, M. Rollins vs. Moe
Freedtn-M. Levy vs. Dr. S. Randall: 9:40,
P. Berman vs. E. Amanuel-M. Rendelman
vs. Sam Beek; 9:47, S. Amanuel vs. Frank
Butler-T. Sarales vs. John Owen; 9:64, R.
Nickel vs. D. Rosenberg-J. Mudrick vs.
V. Inoff.
10:01, A. Selgel vs. F. Paley-P. Baker
vi. W. Gorewltz; 10:08. H. Scheckman vs.
G. Ehrllch-R. Hayman vs. D. Cohen;
10:15. B. Kosow vs. J. Mullendore-L.
Hamberg vs. P. Halpern; 10:22, R. Shinn
vs. J. Lakln-O. Fisher vs. Dr. L. Dubitt:
10:29, Paul Burman vs. M. Gershen-L.
Jacobs vs. A1 Schneider; 10:36, Joe Cohen
vs. B. Kann-Dr. L. Schwarts vs. H. Kipp;
10:43. C. Wood vs. B. Rozansky-J. Long
vs. J. C. Howell: 10:50, L. Klenert vs. N.
Sill-C. Fishman vs. Ted Cohen; 10:57, D.
Tipp vs. G. Ashton-J. Freeman vs. T.
Moyer.
11:04, W. Schwartz vs. I. Cohen-H.
Schattman vs. Max Waeber; 11:11, J. Mc
Shea vs. Dr. B. Isaacson-W. Wilding vs.
H. Greenberg; 11:18, L, Rubin vs. Ed
Grlesemer-M. Sagman vi. S. B. Maize;
11:25, H. Ewen vs. J. Barkln-M. Silver
man vs. A. Magldson; 11:32, J. B. Robert
son vs. Ben Cohen-W. Dlener vs. L. Gorin;
11:39, R. Haves vs. R. C. Carter-F. Kretz
mer vs. 8. Felper: 11:40. G. Schaup vs.
M. Portonoy-J. 8haw vs. F. Brandt: 11:68,
E. Schafer vs. J. Mlnovlch-M. Grant vs.
A1 Horowitz.
12, S. Block vs. O. Hunter-A. Zinna
man vs. Dr. 1. Rosen; 12:07. J. Levinson
vs. I. Perry-H. Laurie vs. M. Watman;
12:14. H. Cohen vs. W. F. Patterson-H.
Murdtck vs. D. Wallace: 12:21. F. Hlrt vs.
T. Colyer-Joe Miller vs. John Taylor;
12:28. J. Feeney vs. Dr. Utz-H. Papier
vs. Dr. H. Brodle; 12:36, T. Meaney vs.
H. Berman-J. Mehl vs. F. Kelley: 12:42.
£• Hartpan vs. c. Berger-C. Andregg vs.
C. Phillips; 12:49. R. Sasscer vs. S. Hay
m*n-H. Gershenson v». T. Corcoran;
12:56. D. Bird vs. H. Sherer-E. Spicer
vs. M. Gordon; 1:03. E. Calllouet vs. K.
Bennett-D. Arnold vs. J. Dubitt.
„ PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE.
Oakland, 10—8; Portland, 6—7.
San Francisco, 4—8; Sacramento, 8—6.
Seattle. 10; Hollywood, 2.
San Diego, 8: Los Angeles. 5.
_ . „ TEXAS LEAGUE.
San Antonio. 13; Oklahoma City, IS (11
lnnlng tie).
Shreveport, 3: Fort Worth, 8 (10-lnnln*
_tie).
Tulsa, S; Houston, 1.
Beaumont, 10; Dallas, 0,
Entry of Jap Aces
In U.S. Tank Meet
Fails to Excite
ly th« Associated Press
LOS ANGELES, Aug. 4.—
What a difference a few years
make.
In the first International
competition Nippon has had
since the war, Japan is sending
six swimmers to participate in
the United States AAU swim
ming and diving champion
ships here August 17-19.
First reaction to the word
that record-breaking Hirono
shin Furuhashi and his mates
are coming has been indiffer
ence.
Promoter Jimmy McHugh, a
songwriter by profession, wired
President Truman and Gen.
MacArthur, seeking approval of
the plan to bring them here.
The general, to quote McHugh,
“gave his blessing.”
Furuhashi and Shiro Hashl
zuma, who recently swam a
dead heat in a 1,500-meter race
timed unofficially at 18 seconds
under the world record, should
provide a stem test for young
Jimmy McLane, America’s de
fending champion at 800 and
1,500 meters.
Less is known about Yoshijiro
Hamaguchi, Sumio Tanaka,
Shuichi Murayama and Shige
yuki Murayama.
If there has been any marked
criticism or enthusiasm for the
renewal of athletic activities
with the Japanese, this comer
hasn’t heard it.
Solicited for reaction was
Louie Zamperinl, former Uni
versity of Southern California
track star and a victim of Jap
anese brutality as a prisoner of
war. His on-the-spur-of-the
moment comment:
“Let ’em come. They didn’t
have any thing to do with
bringing on the war. I’m in
favor of letting the Japs back
in the Olympic games, too."
What a difference
SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION.
Atlanta, 6—0; MemphU, 3—4.
Little Rock. 8—4; Birmingham, 0—8.
New Orleans, 14; Chattanooga, 7 (11 in
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Bogley, Other Capital
Racketers Advance
Special Dispatch to The Star
KALAMAZOO, Mich., Aug. 4.—
Third-seeded Hamilton Richard
son looks a powerful threat to
First-ranked Gil Bogley pf Chevy
Chase, Md., in the National Junior
tennis championships.
Richardson, who calls Baton
Rouge, La., home, has bowled over
three opponents by decisive scores.
In yesterday’s third-round action
he disposed of Charles Rieger of
Philadelphia, 6—3, 6—0.
Bogley, defending champion,
was idle in the singles yesterday,
but he teamed with Dick Squires
of Bronxville, N. Y., to knock off
Ray Smith of Chicago and Larry
Pedicord of Dayton, Ohio, 6—3,
6—2, in the first round of the
doubles.
Tim Coss and Ted Rogers of
Washington, D. C., also advanced
in doubles by beating Jim Sagebiel
of Dayton and Milledge Galphin of
Louisville, 7—5, 6—1, 8—6.
In the boys’ division, Tom
Bradford, 15-year-old Washington
(D. C.) hope, was ousted by Don
Thompson, second-seeded star
from Jackson Heights, N. Y., 7—5,
1—6, 6—1.
Junior Legion Baseball
Playoffs Open Today
Bunker Hill and Government
Printing Office were scheduled to
square off today at 5 p.m. on the
Ellipse in the first game of a best
two out of three series for the
Junior American Legion League
baseball championship.
The winner of this series will
represent Washington in the re
gional championships at Parkers
burg, W. Va. Regional winner will
move up to the nationals, to be
held this year at Omaha, Nebr.
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Langley Captain Tops
Air Force Golf Meet
ly the Associated Press
DAYTON, Ohio, Aug. 4 —Capt.
Don O’Neil of Langley Air Base,
Va., with a 68 had a three-stroke
lead over his closest competitors
going into the second day of play
in the United States Air Force golf
tournament. Tied for second were
T/Sergt. Harold Ridgley of Haver
town, Pa., and Lt. Col. Rennie
Kelly of Beverly Hills, Calif.,
with 71s.
Col. Jimmy Wilson of Washing
ton, D. C., low amateur in the
recent Washington Star open, was
among the leaders with a 74, as
was Capt. Douglas Smith of
Washington with 76.
Ballston Juniors Win
The Ballston Indians junior
baseball team won its 17th straight
game for a season record of 22-2
yesterday by blanking Auto Row,
2-0 behind four-hit pitching from
Lefty Don Kildoo. He fanned 10.
The Dodgers all-Negro battery
of Don Newcombe and Roy Cam
panella formerly played in the
defunct Negro National League.
Ryder Cup Captaincy
GivenHogan,Although
He Still Can't Play
By the Associated Press
CHICAGO, Aug. 4.—Ben Ho
gan, golf’s man of the year in
1948, has been honored with the
captaincy of the United States
Ryder Cup squad, although in
juries suffered in an auto col
lision have sidelined him from
links action.
The Professional Golfers’ Asso
ciation announced yesterday that
Hogan, the jnighty bantam, will
appear with the United States
team in Boston, although he will
not be able to compete.
On August 27-28 at Boston’s
Belmont Country Club the spe
cial challenge match will be
played. The Ryder Cup matches
will be contested in England, Sep
tember 16 and 17.
Hogan was critically injured in
a head-on automobile collision
with a bus in Texas last Febru
ary. His appearance at the Bos
ton challenge matches will mark
his first appearance at a major
golf event since his accident. He
will not be able to play in Eng
land either.
“I’m not sure when I will be able
to play in tournament golf again,”
Hogan told George Schneiter, PGA
tournament manager, “but I cer
tainly intend to do so if it is at all
possible."
Hogan will select the lineups of
the United States squad in singles
and doubles competition. He held
the same honor as captain of the
United States team in 1947 when
the Yanks won an 11-to-l decision
over Britain in Portland, Oreg.
During the 1948 season and up
to the time of his injury, Hogan
had already compiled a total of
1,027% Ryder Cup points. His
total continued to top the list un
til recently when Lloyd Mangrum
overtook him with a total of
1,135% points. Hogan finished
second in the final tabulation.
Major Leaders
ly tht Associated Press
American League.
Batting—Williams, Boston, .341;
Dl Maggio, Boston, and Dilllnger, St.
Louis, .343.
Runs—Williams, Boston, 98; Joo3t,
Philadelphia, 85.
Runs batted In—Williams, Boston,
107; Stephens, Boston. 108.
Hits—Dl Maegio, Boston, 128; Wil
liams, Boston. 127.
Doubles—Williams, Boston, 28: Ma
Jeskt. Philadelphia, 27.
Home runs—Wllllama, Boston, *6;
Stephens, Boston, 25.
Stolen bases—Dilllnger, St. Louis,
9; Valo. Philadelphia. 8.
Pitching—Reynolds, New York, 11-2,
.848: Wynn, Cleveland, 9-2, .818.
Strikeouts—Trucks, Detroit, 108;
Newhouser, Detroit, 94.
National League.
Batting—Robinson, Brooklyn, .365;
Slaughter. St. Louts, .331.
Runs—Reese, Brooklyn, 84; Robin
son. Brooklyn. 80.
Runs batted In—Robinson, Brook
lyn. 84: Hodges. Brooklyn. 7 0.
Hits — Robinson, Brooklyn, 141;
Thomson, New York, 136.
Double?—Thomson, New York, 25:
Jones, Philadelphia, and Musial, St.
Louis, 24.
Home runs—Klner. Pittsburgh. 27;
Gordon. New York. 23.
Stolen bases—Robinson, Brooklyn,
26; Reese, Brooklyn, 15.
Pitching—Sewell. Pittsburgh, 5-1,
.833; Branca, Brooklyn, 12-3, .800.
Strikeouts — Saphn, Boston, 90:
Branca, Brooklyn, 83.
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Capital's Morris Shoots
Fort Knox Hole-in-One
Special Dispatch to Th« Star
FORT KNOX, Ky„ Aug. 4.—Bob
Morris of Washington, D. C., fired
a hole-in-one on the 12th hole of
the Officers’ Club golf course here.
He used a No. 7 iron for the 150
yard shot.
Morris was playing in company
with Jerry Hart, also from Wash
ington. Both are here for a two
week officers’ reserve training
course.
Ortiz, Hurt, Postpones
Bout With Cooper Here
The 10-round boxing match be
tween Manuel Ortiz of California
and Jimmy Cooper of Washington
originally scheduled for August 15
at Griffith Stadium has been post
poned two weeks until August 29.
Ortiz, world bantamweight cham
pion, twisted his knee yesterday
and will not be able to do serious
training for two weeks.
Ty Cobb played more major
league games than any other
player—3,033 games.
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Buddy Thomas Kayoed
By Salt Lake Fighter
By the Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY, Aug. 4.—
Rex Layne, 190, of Lewiston, Utah,
knocked out Buddy Thomas, 189,
of Washington, D. C„ In 2:44 of
the second round of a 10-round
main event at the Fairgrounds
Coliseum last night.
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"SCOOP"
FIBRE SEAT COVERS
Complete sets for most cars, not
just throw-overs. Protect your
upholstery and your clothes.
1 SEAT COVERS FOR 1949 CARS!
UNIVERSAL
FIBRE
$14.95
Sturdy coyer, to fit
most 1949 cars.
UNIVERSAL
PLASTIC
$19.95
installed*
Lonr-wearint: fit
most ears. Center
arm rest style
slirhtly hither.
CUSTOM-MADK
PLASTIC
$34.95
Installed*
Perfect-flttinr. cool*
lonr-wearing:.
•$2.50 Installation charce
I STORE HOURS:
Weekdays,
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Friday A Saturday!,
8 a.m. to 8, P.m.
Sunday! A Holiday!,
8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
FREE PARKING:
Use our parkins lot risht
on the premises. Another
Manhattan's customer's
service.
BRITISH »
AUSTIN ■
DEALER— m
S»les-SerTici-P»rt« K
^^^^istabushe^^ear^^^^
I BOTH SIDES OF SEVENTH AT R STREETS, HJf. J

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