OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 25, 1949, Image 37

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1949-10-25/ed-1/seq-37/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for B-18

JOHN la. WlUTIt !
F St. N.W. ST. 6100 I
Call (or oar low prices.
COAL
Money-Back Guarantee
Va. Anthracite Nut $15.80
Pea $13.30. Stove SI5.05
Briuueti $10.00. Buckwheat $10.00
Blue Err $13.10: 50% Lumg $11.10
BLUE RIDGE COAL CO.. INC.
Fuel Oil—Oil Burnert—Heatinr Equipment
__ME. 3545_
vi'MiVftw
Paint YOUR House White
Because when you
paint with white—
you paint right. Use
■Winslow s Outside
paint in white, or
colors at $4.20 a
gallon ... then
you're double right.
A paint made of pure
linseed oil. lead, zinc
and titanox applied
now while the sun is
not too hot will
oxidize better and
become more weather resistant.
Silver Spring Paint A Hardware Co.
Bethesda Paint A Hardware Co.
Takoma Paint A Hardware Co.
Becker Paint A Glass Co.. Georgetown I
Local Paint A Hardware Co., Hyattsville
922 New York Ave. (1) NA. 8610
Open Mon. thru Sat., 7 a.m. to ft:30 p.m
FREE PARKING next door for our patrons.
CONVWt
<o ^Mfomofi'c
no money down
little as $10 o month
Let ns explain the many advantacea
of having BRYANT GAS HEAT in ,
your home. Mr. C. W. Msteer. for
merly with the Washington £>as Light
Co., personally snpervises and guar
antees every installation. Registered
in D. C., Md. and Va.
Standard GAS Appliance
Plumbing—Heating—A ppliances
2813 14th St. N.W.
Ml. 5393—NO. 3467
ALUMINUM |
PRE BILT GARAGES
4*
£ 12x20
X EASY
«* TERMS "j&stES? f
X COTTAGES — CABINS T
GARAGES — DOORS X
All buildings manufactured la T
* * our own plant. No middle man «»
to pay. i H : J
w a Buildings designed te your w*
specifications. i
* ® Deal with one management— W»
€ ^ one responsibility. i
4 # General Industries, Inc. T
„ 1109 Jeff Davis Highway J
*Tr H Mile South 14th St. Bridge
X on U. S. No. 1 a
Otis 8016-8017 X
&mjA
Your Home I
pERMA-STONg I
' **14 $lxth St N.W. I
Phone: RE. 6074 ■
GAS HEAT
Conversions, Furnaces, Boilers
36 Month* to Pay on Gat Bill
TA. 3036 E. L. POE TA. 3396
Formerly 17 years with Gas Company
Combination
DOORS
All Sizes
HESLOP
Lumber & Millwork Co.
724 Eye Si. S.W. NA. 9448
_ADVERTISEMENT
Flora Joins
"Boosters"
“I’m the biggest booster in the
block for Ranger Joe,” says Flora
Schneider, age 6.
And theres’ a thought for you,
Mother. If you have to coax your
youngsters to eat cereals, try
crisp, crunchy Ranger Joe Popped
Wheat. That delicious honey
flavor makes young folks go for
it like candy. And remember,
Ranger Joe gives all the health
ful, body-building food value of
whole wheat.
FLORA SCHNEIDER
3400 B St. SE. |
For Lumber Coll Our Number ATIantic 1400
0
CONVENIENT SHOPPING UNTIL 6:00 P.M.
“HARRY HOMEOWNER" USES
i •
Pine Shelving
FOR EXTRA STORAGE SPACE
8*
PER FOOT
l"x 12"
12*
PER FOOT
l"x 12"
That’s right, two different prices on the same product, but
don’t be fooled . . . they’re not the same quality. True,
they’re both white pine, but the difference is so great we
must insist you see the “Bargain” stock before you buy,
while we’ll deliver our better stock on your phone order
and guarantee satisfaction.
COME -WRITE- PHONE-ATlantic 1400
FOR ALL YOUR HOUSE REPAIR NEEDS
NORTHEAST NORTHWEST ANACOSTIA VIRGINIA
lfith * H St». BBSS G». Art. 1B0S NiehoU At*. Fall* Church,LecHr.
at Bladentbura Rd. at Militant Rd. at Good Hove Rd. at Hillwood Ate.
Goren on Bridge
By Charles H. Goren
An ingenious Swindle.
Lying is a gentle art in the exer
cise of which certain fundamental
principles must be observed. One is
to avoid the telling of useless lies.
Another is to tell only those that
have a reasonable chance to be ac
cepted as the truth.
Promiscuous false-carding at the
bridge table often defeats its own
purpose. Particularly is this apt to
be true on the defense where you
have a partner whose co-operation
you may require in defeating the
contract, and who might be de
ceived more than the declarer. How
ever, occasionally a situation will
develop in which you know that
your partner will have little if any
thing to do with the defense and
consequently there is no harm in
deceiving him, whereas some dust
might effectively be thrown into
declarer’s eyes.
A most ingenious swindle was per
petrated by the West of today’s
hand. It required a bit of quick
thinking that always gains the
plaudits of this department. Our
sympathies go out to declarer, who
was an innocent victim of his ad
versary’s well-laid plot.
South became declarer at a con
tract of three no-trump on bidding
that was normal in all respects.
West led the six of diamonds, which
was taken with the ace in dummy.
With §even top-card tricks, the best
chance for the two others appeared
to be development of the spade suit.
A low spade was led to the ace.
West could see that the suit was
going to produce four tricks for the
declarer. He therefore, immediately
dropped the king under the ace.
This play did not sacrifice a trick,
since West still had the suit stopped.
Who could blame the declarer for
abandoning spades in favor of the
club finesse? Even if the finesse
failed there was still the chance
that clubs might break, so that the
13th club would produce trick No. 9.
When the club finesse failed, the
diamond suit was cleared and South
was now helpless, since there was
no way to develop the ninth trick
without letting West in with a
spade.
Tomorrow’s problem—
East opens with one spade, as
South you hold:
*KQ5 <7AK4 OAQJ6 *1073
What is your call?
Railroad Expansion
Proposed for Congo
Construction of 1,500 miles of
new line to provide a north-south
trunk route is being considered
for the Belgian Congo under a 10
year program of railroad build
ing drafted by the Belgian Min
istry of the Colonies.
It Includes extension of the
Cape-Congo trunk line from its
present northern terminus at
Port Francqui, on the Kasai River,
to Leopol^ille, abut 550 miles.
Both vulnerable. South deals.
NORTH
* Q 7 6 4 8
8 7 2,
0 A9
* AK J
WEST EAST
♦ KJ10 *985
Q 3 J 10 9 6
OQJ8643 0 105
*64 *Q 10 9 2
SOUTH
* A2
AK54
0 K72
*8753
The bidding:
South West North East
1 heart Pass 1 spade Pass
1 NT Pass 3 NT Pass
Pass Pass
Opening lead, six of diamonds.
(Copyright. 1949. by Charles H. Goren.)
rs** ■ ]
S2 far yaur idau wa print. Writ*
s tarry LanpaW c't Tha Ewning Sty y
M
6
THAT UK) roll as windows
ARB EOU.BD DOWN...WOULD
KEEP OUT BOOS AND KEEP
CHILDREN AMD PEIS IN.
Aew«* C iO**An. Fall ttvgm
L. <W Syfcwa I M y
CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
HORIZONTAL.
1 Kind of meat
4 Wash in clear
water
9 To fondle
12 Collection of
facts
13 Junction
14 A macaw
15 A stump (pi.)
17 A phase of
golf
19 Grows wan
20 Killed
21 Jewel
23 Title of respect
24 Spanish for
yes
26 Part of body
29 Child’s game
31 Citrus fruit
33 European
river
35 Border
37 Challenge
38 Distributed
40 Sailor
42 River of
England
43 Babylonion
deity
44 Two wings
conjoined in
heraldy
46 Public
conveyance
48 Stuck in mud
50 To mature
54 Occupy the
leading place
56 Angry
57 Hawaiian
hawk
58 Bring to
conflict
60 Girl’s name
61 Compass point
62 Planted
63 Budhist
pillar
VERTICAL.
1 Clasp
2 Brazilian
tapir
3 To handle
roughly
4 Kind of apple
Answer to Yesterday’s Puzzle.
cun
V
B
K
ft
5 Preposition
6 Blights
7 Disembodied
spirits
8 To settle in
alienably on a
person and
descendants
9 Ache
10 Sea eagle
11 Child’s game
16 Solicit alms
18 Wearied
22 to deface
24 Distressing
25 Arrow poison
26 City of Italy
27 Notion
28 Wager
30 A fish spear
32 Angry
34 Corrects
36 Unruly
gathering
39 Family ser
vant in
Moliere’s
Tartufe
41 Submerged
45 A shelf
47 Title of
respect
48 Pronoun
49 lifeless
51 Metal
container
52 Volcano
53 Precise
54 Transfix
55 Fish eggs
59 Earth goddess
i
p
o
G
O
i; ■
NOW'S MY CHANCE TO W
ESCAPE WHILE OL' FOX U
AN' WILEY CAT 15 —J
BLEEPIN'OFF THAT ^
RUBBER BOO^
W 15 I 1 IT'S WORTH A
/ ASLEEP OR . POT 5H0T JU5' INI
f IS OUR POT I CASE WE ISN'T WATCHlN'
7) WALKIN' THE SAME PREAM ^
/ AWAy?
I0-Z5
somebody thinkin' ^
OF ME-MV
ears Ringin'
LIKE A BARREL-HOUSE /
! BANG-JO.
itopr, 1«1, N. V. M C«I.
I
Efj
E
U
z
s
A
W
Y
E
R
I ASSUMING THAT BARGAIN'S DONE 1
SOMETHING TO DEI RIO, THEN WHAT? J
^AND WHERE 00 ISTARTlOOKING^™
tO-Rjs-APOfHj|
CTWENTY MINUTES OF FRUITLESS SEARCH...
V THEN FROM AFAR A FAMILIAR VOICE
SINGING GRAND OPERA.
PANCHO'S VOlCEil
HE'S A PRISONER! 1
THERE'S AN
ARMED GUARD*
^ . * . j
T
H
i
B
E
R
R
Y
S
BOY, THAT GUY YEAH, HE
BAGBY GETS lh USED TO
MY HAIR ' i BOTHER
20-25" " ME ,700/
BY TH' WAY/ 1
HOW DID YOU ,
6ET RID OF
^ HIM? ^
T IT WASN'T
I IEASY, PAlL
"Copr,lT^9^uTTnT?!m^CcK**
All rights reserved |
f I LENT HIM FIVE DOLLARS
r-1 TWO YEARS AGO/j
A
M
E
R
I
C
A
N
A
D
V
E
N
T
U
R
E
LAFITTE - PIRATE PATRIOT
i
I AM CAPTAIN LOCKYEZ
FEOM THE BRITISH PLEET,
I WAVE A ME££A6£ POfc
^^tJ^UeLAFITTE.
A FEW MINUTES LATEP«
^OU ABE ONE OF V" MON5I EUR.
LAFITTE'5 MEN? / I AM LAFITTE.
YOUR DAILY
QUIZ:
WHAT \e THE
PIFFERENKE
BETWEEN A
BOAT ANP A
5HIP?
YESTERDAY’S
ANSWER:
*BAeATAP.IA'*VYA5
NAME 6IVEN TO
6ULF ISLANP5
WHERE LAFITTE'5
PIRATED HAP
HEAPQUARTcRS
NAME TAKEN FROM
VOH OUIXOTE".
M
O
0
N
M
U
L
L
1
N
S
IT'S MRS. ZIPPEV.^H NO. NO. NO! ■
SHE WANTS TO BRlNd 1 THAT WOULD ,
SOME FRIENDS k NEVER
-—^OVER.
v>y\
/''but we
I CAN OO OVER
THERE.
LORD PLUSH- J
l BOTTOM! j-S
SAX I
THOUGHT
YOU WAS
GOIN'
^ our.
5«*4fcU. S P»t Of
Coprrirfci. !M». by
w* Syndicate Co hm
A)i^
t
E
S
S
I
E
[ yoo-Hoo,
V BESSIE -
COME OVER ^
AND HAVE A
GLASS OF ^
LEMONADE-J
I'02*
?X CANTOS
/ LEAVE THE «
HOUSE UNTIL
I I FINISH My
7 MUSIC LESSON
1 BUT ILL TAKE
^THE^EMONADE;
Copr t«4*. SuR aiul
AH H|ha raarrvari
Nature s Children
By Lillian Cox A they
Mud Hens.
In the Puget Sound region burrow
ing clams are called “mud hens."
The name is due to the plump
chicken-like breast. The clams are
elusive enough to make their cap
ture exciting, and the flavor of their
flesh, a cross between crab and
spring lamb, a delicious morsel.
Three mud hens make enough
chowder for six.
This burrowing clam is a discreet
and smaller cousin of the famous
giant geoduck (pronounced jeoduk).
The clam hunter rises at dawn
to be sure of his tasty chowder for
dinner. The eight-inch shells are
not wide enough to cover the bulg
ing breast. Unlike other shell ani
mals the mud hen is unable to lock
her doors. Wisely she hides deep in
the ooze, pushing her long, dark,
rubbery neck above the surface. In
coming tides, bringing minute or
ganisms, satisfy her hunger. She
is sedenary in her habits and puts
on weight. Her bulging breast is
the meat man is after.
This clam has neither sight, hear
ing or sense of smell, yet it is never
caught napping. The vibration of
your footsteps is sufficient notifica
tion. The three-foot siphon is im
mediately pulled down to three
inches.
Clam hunters cruise about in quiet
waters until they discover several
rubbery necks waving about in the
shallow water or mud. The boat is
made fast, spade and bucket picked
up. The hunt is oh!
Expert clam diggers note the
place where the siphon was, push
the spade deep and throw the con
tents aside.. Often the clam is thus
captured. If not, one reaches down
into the water-filled excavation,
loosens the clam from its moorings
and draws it forth unprotesting as
it is dropped into the bucket.
▲ novice grab* the neck which
promptly withdraws from his fin
gers and as a parting gesture squirts
a stream of salt water into the eye
of the indiscreet hunter. There is
much fun and endless banter among
the diggers.
Washington decrees the geoduck
a real game animal, therefore it is
not seen in the fish markets. Be
sides, hunting for geoducks is real
sport. No one would dream of
passing up the exciting experience
of capturing the bag limit for de
lectable chowder.
Word Game
Find 22 or more words in
PHONOGRAPHS,
meaning, “an instrument for re
producing speech and music.”
Average is 21; limit, 20 minutes.
Rule*—Words must be of four or more
letter*. Words which acquire four letters
by the addition of "*," such as “bats."
“cats." are not used. Only one form of a
word is used. Prober names are not used.
A list will be published tomorrow.
Answer te EVERYDAY. .
eave vary reed dray ]
eared veer yard dyer
eery very year aver
ever rave dare
evade ready dear .
every read deer
Take My Word for It
—By Frank Colby!
A tew weeks ago I stated that in
the country as a whole the prevail
ing pronunciation for the word err
is ehr, as in error, and that erring
is almost always pronounced ehr-ing.
I also reported that ehr for err has
not yet been recognized by the dic
tionaries, but that ehr-ing for erring
is sanctioned by many dictionaries.
Three or four readers have told
me that they are shocked at my
attempt to debauch “the King’s
English”; that, “the dictionary” is
the only authority for correct pro
nunciation, and that I had better
stick to “the dictionary’’ if I know
what’s good for me.
Weil, now, to get a few things
straight, "the King’s English”
(whatever that is) is not American
English and never has been. Amer
ican usage is not based on nor in
fluenced by British usage.
Secondly, dictionaries do not es
tablish correctness—they simply re
port good usage, and, in many cases,
they report erroneously.
Thirdly, this column would have
no purpose if it merely parroted
what is in thfe dictionaries. Its pur
pose is to report and interpret, as
accurately as human frailty will
permit, the pronunciations and
usages that prevail among Ameri
cans of good education.
Now let’s see about the word err.
It comes from the French verb error
(pronounced: ehr-AY), from the
Latin errare (pronounced: ehr-AH
reh), the same word that gives us
erratic, erratum, erroneous, error,
none,of which have “urr” in the first
syllable.
Note that the pronunciation ehr
ing for erring is given complete
sanction by Webster’s New Interna
tional, Funk and Wagnalls, the New
Century, Webster’s New Collegiate,
the American College Dictionary,
Kenyon and Knott’s Pronouncing
Dictionary, and WORDS: The New
Dictionary.
(I cite these dictionaries, not to
prove that ehr-ing is a correct pro
nounciation, but to show that they
are reporting correctly).
To conclude, if ehr-ing for erring
is a correct pronounciation (which
it is), how'can any one, Including
the dictionaries, hold that ehr for
err is incorrect or debased? The
millions of persons who say ehr
ing for erring will surely say ehr for
err. And why not? Wouldn’t it be
silly to hear some one say, "I’m sorry,
my ehr-ing friend, but you urr when
you say ’ehr*”?
Test You r Horse Sense
-By Dr. G. W. Cryf
1. Scratch grain is usually fed to
creatures which make which char
acteristic sound? Moo, Oink, Cackle,
Baa?
2. A yam most nearly resembles
Eggplant, Swqet Potato, Turnip, Cu
cumber?
3. Which creature gives birth to
the most young? Cow, Goat, Rabbit,
Sheep?
4. A squirrel hunter would nor
mally head for which tree? Birch,
Mtfple, Catalpa, Hickory?
5. Which one of these flowers is
usually tallest? Aster, Sunflower,
Nasturtium, Sweet Pea?
6. This is a True-False problem
dealing with our psychological es
timation of time. If you think a
statement is true, then encircle the
letter “T” in front of it, but if you
consider it to be false, then encircle
the “F.” One point for each cor
rect judgment.
T P (a) To a child, the day
seems to pass slowly.
T F (b) To a grandparent, 1th*
day seems to pass slowly.
T P (c) To a child the year
seems to pass swiftly.
T P (d) To a grandparent, the
year seems to pass slowly.
T P (e) ’While we are busy, time
seems to pass quickly.
Score yourself as follows: 0-2. poor; 8-0.
average; 7-8, superior; 9-10, very superior.
Answers to Horae Sense (tuis.
1. Cackle (Chickens). 2. Sweet pota
to. 3. Rabbit. 4. Hickory (Nut). S. Sun
flower. 6. False (a); fast. True (b);
little to break monotony, False (c); in ret
respect filled time seems long. False <d);
It flies. True (e).
Demands for curtailment of
government spending are expect
ed in Austria, as increased taxes
have put a heavy strain on the
population, Vienna reports.
--_iu
Points for Parents
—By Edyth Thomas Wallaco
. The best wav to teach good manners is by daily example;
A poor method is to threaten for non-observance.
This
m». TIM R*Km
M4 THMiim fynOetf*
„ Not This 1
Mother—Please bring me the
paper, son. . . . Thank you.
Father—Please hand me an ash
tray. ... Thank you.
Mother—Don’t give Tom ',,gjay
gum if he doesn’t say “please”
and don’t bring him any more If
he forgets to thank you.

xml | txt