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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 29, 1950, Image 17

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Society News
Ambassador and Senora de Berckemeyer
Honor Former Envoy and Mrs. Davies
By Katherine M. Brooks
The Peruvian Ambassador and
Benora de Berckemeyer were hosts
at a delightful party yesterday.
The occasion was the awarding of
Peru’s highest honor to former
United States Ambassador Joseph
E. Davies.
The Ambassador made the pres
entation on behalf of his govern
ment in appreciation of Mr. Dav
ies’ untiring efforts for peace, and
especially of his work in behalf of
Peru when he was that govern
ment’s legal representative during
the successful negotiations for a
settlement of the long-standing
Tacna-Arica controversey between
Peru and Chile.
In accepting the Grand Cross of
thq Order of the Sun Mr. Davies
spoke of the friendship and under
standing between the governments
of Peru and the United States,
which he called “the kind of
understanding and friendship
which is the greatest need of the
world today.”
The ambassador put over Mr.
Davies’ shoulder the wide purple
ribbon and pinned the exquisite
golden sun on his coat. The cere
mony took place at 6 o’clock yes
terday in the drawing room of the
embassy on Garrison street.
The hosts with Mr. and Mrs.
Davies stood in the center of the
great drawing room to receive the
several hundred guests.
Senora de Berckemeyer wore a
very becoming beige lace gown
with brown belt and scarf of tulle
matching her dainty suede slip
pers. Mrs. Davies had on a steel
gray taffeta frock fashioned with
dropped shoulder line and very full
elbow length sleeves. The bodice
had a round, rather low neckline
and was embroidered with cut
steel. Her black hat had a wide
brim at one side which was up
turned to show her soft silvery
hair.
Early arrivals had a chance to
eee the unusual display and ar
rangement of orchids, in the
drawing room and in the library.
The early arrivals also had a brief
chance to enjoy the lovely lawn
and terrace before the rain came
to spoil a garden party and turn
It into a very delightful in-door
reception.
Following the ceremony of
presentation a fascinating pro
gram of native Peruvian songs
and dances was given by Lupe
Dapenos, wearing colorful native
dress. She was accompanied by
her brothers, who with her form
an interesting trio known as Los
Chicanos.
The guests were representative
of the many circles of Capital so*
eiety. In the group there were
four other holders of the Grand
Cross of the Order of the Sun, the
Spanish Ambassador - at - Large,
Senor Felix Lequerica, former
United States Ambassador Wil
liam S. Culbertson, former Sena
tor Hiram Bingham, and Mr. Jul
ius Klein, whose first official post
was director of Foreign and Do
mestic Commerce in the Com
merce Department.
The Secretary of Agriculture
and Mrs. Charles F. Brannan, As
sociate Justice and Mrs. Stanley
F. Reed, Senator and Mrs. J. Wil
liam Fulbright, and Engineer
Commissioner of the District of
Columbia and Mrs. Gordon R.
Young were among the officials
at the party. But predominating
In the large group were those
I from resident circles, personal
friends of Mr. and Mrs. Davies
and the hosts.
Mrs. Millard E. Tydings, wife of
the Maryland Senator and daugh
ter of Mr. Davies, with her daugh
ter, Eleanor, who is a member of
the junior class at Garrison For
rest, also attended. Another
daughter, Mrs. Rahel Davies
Fitch, and her daughter, Susanne,
also witnessed the ceremony.
Mrs. D. Buchanan Merryman
was among the early arrivals, as
was Mrs. Gilbert M. Hitchcock,
the latter talking of her plans for
a European holiday for which she
will sail next week. Already every
day during her Paris stay is party
filled.
Mrs. Fred A. Britten was early
enough to enjoy the terrace be
fore the rain. Also there were Mr.
and Mrs. James Lawrence Hought
eling. Miss Carolyn Nash, another
Washingtonian to vacation abroad;
Mrs. McCeney Werlich, Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel H. Kauffmann, Col.
and Mrs. M. Robert Guggenheim,
Mrs. William Mann, Mr. John A.
Logan, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Meyer and Mrs. Randolph Hunt
ington Miner, who spent some
time chatting with the former
Romanian Minister to Washing
ton, Mr. Charles Davila.
Tea Is Given
For Graduate
Miss Florence Taaffe enter
tained at a tea yesterday in honor
of Miss Mary Courtney, who will
be graduated June 7 from George
town Visitation Convent. The at
tractive 4-to-6 party for the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
J. Courtney of Silver Spring took
place in the American Newspaper
Women’s Clubhouse where all 46
members of the graduating class
gathered during the afternoon.
Miss Courtney received them in
a becoming bouffant afternoon
frock of cornflower blue organdy.
A group of the hostess’ friends
took turns at the candlelit tea
table and punch bowl table
centered with varicolored spring
flowers. Assisting were Mrs. Court
ney, Mrs. Oscar L. Chapman,
ranking guests: Mrs. Eugene Mc
Carthy of St. Paul, where the
Courtneys formerly lived; Mrs.
John A. Carroll, wife of Repre
sentative Carroll of Denver, and
her house guest, Mrs. David
Brosman, who arrived with Judge
Brosman yesterday from Denver,
and Mrs. Elizabeth Young (Mary
Hayworth). The Carrolls’ daugh
ter, Diane, and Mrs. Young’s
daughter, Amelia, members of the
Visitation graduating class, were
among the guests.
An out-of-town guest, Mrs.
George Connery of Minneapolis,
who is visiting her son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs
George E. Connery in Arlington,
accompanied Mrs. Connery, who
assisted at the party. Others in
the assisting group included Miss
Grace McGerr, president of the
American Newspaper Women’s
Club; Miss Jane Stafford, presi
dent of the Women’s National
Press Club; Mrs. James W. Boyer,
Mrs. Louis Stem, Mrs. James A.
Murray, Mrs. Luis Aveleyra, Mrs
William H. Collins, Mrs. John V.
Boyle, Miss Geraldine Walsh, Mrs
Frank Duane, Mrs. Joseph E.
! Blomgren and Miss Urcel Daniel.
Morrises Give Gay Party
Diplomatic and official society
were well represented at the gay
reception given yesterday after
noon by Mr. and Mrs. Edgar
Morris at their charming home on
Linnean avenue.
Honor guests of the Morrises
were members of the American
Newspaper Women’s Club and the
Women’s National Press Club.
Mrs. Morris is an associate mem
ber of the former organization
and among the guests yesterday
were many other associate mem
bers.
Mrs. Morris never stands in the
receiving line for long at any of
her parties, preferring to mingle
about to see that all of her guests
enjoy themselves. Yesterday the
gracious hostess wore a becoming
gown of black net with a cluster
of orchids pinned at her left
shoulder. Mr. Morris received in
the attractively furnished drawing
room assisted by the presidents of
the two clubs, Miss Grace McGerr
and Miss Jane Stafford.
The spacious porch of the im
posing home of the Morrises over
looking Rock Creek Park was the
favorite place yesterday. Here
guests enjoyed a lavish repast in
cluding turkey, ham, salads and
ever so many delicious tea-time
dainties for which yesterday’s
hostess is noted. Liquid refresh
ments also were served.
The Secretary of the Interior
MRS. MILLENSON.
The former Miss Charlotte
Katz, she was married to Mr.
Roy Handen Millenson yester
day at the home of Rabbi
Marry Silverstone, who offici
ated at the ceremony. The
bride is the daughter of Mrs.
Sonia Katz and Mr. Millenson
ts the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Millenson.
—Steve Zweig Photo.
and Mrs. Oscar L. Chapman, the
Undersecretary of the Navy and
Mrs. Dan A. Kimball and the As
sistant to the President and Mrs.
John R. Steelman were among
those arriving early. Others
glimpsed as the party got under
way were the Ambassador of
Bolivia and Senora de Martinez
Vargas, the Ambassador of Ceylon
and Mrs. Corea, the Ambassador
of Chile and Senora de Nieto del
Rio, the Ambassador of Honduras
and Senora Dona de Valle, the
Irish Ambassador and Mrs.
Hearne, and the Ambassador of
Panama and Senora de Herbruger.
Others on the invitation list
were the Charge D’Affaires ot
Iraq and Mme. Bakr, Senator
and Mrs. Homer Ferguson, the
Commissioner of Patents and Mrs
John A. Marshall, Representative
and Mrs. John Kee, the Rev.
Joseph F. Thorning, Maj. Gen.
and Mrs. William D. Connor,
Brig. Gen. and Mrs. Louis R. Ren
frew, Col. and Mrs. Jess B. Ben
nett, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Miller,
the Deputy Commissioner of In
ternal Revenue and Mrs. Eldon
P. King and many others.
MRS. MORRIS.
—Hessler Photo.
Miss Anne Elizabeth Humphries,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward
L. Humphries of Clifton Forge,
Va., became the bride of Mr. Leo
Aloysius Morris, son of Mrs. John
P. Morris of Pittston, Pa., and the
late Mr. Morris, at a ceremony
Saturday at St. Anthony’s Church.
The Rev. Raymond G. Decker offi
ciated at the ceremony.
TENNIS FEATURE OF PARTY FOR MRS. ARNOLD.
Guests at the luncheon given Friday in h onor of Mrs. William H. Arnold by Mrs. Donald
Dunford at the Army Navy Country Club enjoyed a tennis match beforehand. Pictured about to
go on the court are, left to right, Mrs. Dunford, Mrs. Arnold and Mrs. Frank Pace, jr., wife of the
Secretary of the Army. Mrs. Arnold is the wife of Maj. Gen. Arnold, who will be leaving this sum
mer for Ankara, Turkey, to take over his new post as Chief of the Military Aid to Turkey Mission.
—Star Staff Photo.
Exclusively Yours
Trek to Europe Indicates Few Fears of Conflict Abroad;
Capitalites Find It Fashionable to Sojourn In Hospitals
By Betty Beale
Yesterday was the day when
trouble in Berlin could set off or
lead to a third World War. While
the military had wisely prepared
for the worst, it would seem by the
continued eastward trek to Europe
that most people have not given a
third war a second thought.
Even Sir Alexander Cadogan,
retiring United Kingdom delegate
to the U. N., who has been sit
ting practically in the laps of the
U.S.S.R. representatives since 1946,
has indicated that he expects
nothing worse than peace. Other
wise he certainly would not have
taken an apartment at Salzburg,
Austria, for the five weeks of this
summer when the famous music
festival is held. Austria, with its
separate occupied zones, is about
as hot a spot as Germany. After
Lady Cadogan, who is a music
devotee and connoisseur, has been
steeped in symphony for five
weeks, the British couple will go
on to Kitzbuhel, which is in the
Austrian Tyrol. And these people
should be gun-shy — they were
bombed out of their London home
during the war.
Frances Rosso sailed for Italy
Friday on the Conte Biancamano.
She will join her husband, Au
gusto Rosso, in Florence, have a
visitor-ful summer in their lovely
villa there and return to their
apartment in Washington next
November-Bachelor Jack Logan
will emplane for Europe this com
ing Sunday to attend the Inter
national Congress on Food Distri
bution in Paris, before flying back
on the 6th of July. He was using
the cloud route last week when
delayed on his way back from a
meeting in Sun Valley. He was
snowbound in Denver!
* * * ^
Teresa Muniz, the beautiful,
cultured daughter of the Brazilian
Ambassador to the U. N. whose
hand was sought by Hugo Gouth
ier, has been appearing very fre
quently of late with a bachelor
Spanish nobleman. Friends on the
New York scene believe that an
announcement is forthcoming.
The gentleman is the Marques
Pepe de Belmonte. He’s good
looking, in his thirties and in the
import-export business, which
keeps him in Gotham for seven
months of the year, in Spam
about three and in Paris and
Rome the rest of the time.
* * * *
It’s getting downright fashion
able to be hospitalized. Any num
ber of Capitalities are just now
checking out of sick bay. Tom
Blake is returning to circulation
this week, having recuperated
from an acute illness that whisked
him off and under the knife two
weeks ago. Dorothy Foote, who
was also operated on two weeks
ago, will be out and about this
week. Mrs. Jim Foskett went
home from Bethesda Naval Hos
pital Saturday, is doing very
nicely. And Lt. George Williams
is at last out of the Naval Hos
pital after four weeks of the
Christening
Party Given
Mr. and Mrs. William Carter
Pennington entertained at a small
tea yesterday following the chris
tening of their infant daughter,
Catherine Ann Pennington. The
party was given in the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Robert Pen
nington, parents of the child’s
father.
The christening took place in
the Chevy Chase Methodist
Church. The baby’s godmother Is
Mrs. George C. Clarke, jr. A chris
tening dress, which has been in
the family of Mr. Pennington for
many years, was worn by his
daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. George C. Lewis,
parents of Mrs. Pennington, came
from their home in Bryn Mawr for
the christening.
Emily Post
A prospective bride explains: “I
had expected to ask my fiance’s
sister to serve as one. of my four
bridesmaids. My sister is to be
my maid of honor. I don’t know
his sister very well, but I thought
I had to do this in courtesy.
Someone now tells me this is no
longer a rule and that I should
not leave out a friend to make
place for the sister. Please advise
me.”
It is both courteous and usual
to include his sister—especially so
if you are having as many as five
attendants. The same is true of
the bridegroom’s asking one of the
bride’s brothers to serve as an
usher.
Omitting the Children
Dear Mrs. Post: I realize when
there is a family with three small
children the latter can be omitted
from the invitation to my wedding
by simply addressing it to the par
ents. But how can one invitation
serve when there are two grown
children who would be welcome
;and two small children who are
not wanted on this occasion?
Answer: You address the mail
| ing envelope to Mr. and Mrs. John
Duncan alone. And then on the
inside envelope you list all those
you want to include this way:
Mr. and Mrs. Duncan
Mary and Jane
Arthur and John. Jr.
If the names of any younger
MATTRESSES
MADE LIKE NEW
Old Mittrmn, Bex Sprinri, Stadie
Cnehn. Special One-day Service.
Daniel Bedding Co.
Roar 1734 14th St. N.W.
Phone HU. 3600
ones are not included the parents
will surely understand that they
are not expected.
Correct Use of Your Name
Dear Mrs. Post: I want to have
visiting cards printed; also some
formal writing paper marked.
What name shall I use? I’m Mrs.
John Henry Jones with a recent
degree of PhD. I work for a large
company under the name of Miss
Mary Blank.
Answer: It will be necessary to
have separate plates and dies
made. Mrs. John Henry Jones
should be used for a personal vis
iting card and your initials
(N.B.J.) on your formal paper or
simply your address or possibly
both. Your business cards should
be Mary Blank. PhD.
* * * *
Is your question about wed
ding invitations or announce
ments? Mrs. Post is sorry she
cannot answer personal mail,
but her leaflet E-10 gives the
forms and other information
about various types of weddings.
To obtain a copy, send 5 cents
in coin and a stamped, self-ad
dressed envelope to her, c/o The
Evening Star, P. O. Box 99, Sta
tion G, New York 19, N. Y.
Opening Sun., May 28th
Seaport inn
SEAFOOD
STEAKS CHOPS
Serving Finn Foods in Finn Atmosphere
6 King St., Alexandria, Va.
Sun., 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
W#«k Days, 11 «.m. toll p.m,
PhMt AL 2141
mumps and when he left they
probably heaved a sigh of relief,
though they may be a little bored
now. They never knew when joke
ster George would slip into a
white coat and professional man
ner, put a stethescope around his
neck and visit some of the more
attractive patients! . . . Still in
George Washington Hospital is a
one-time Capital resident, Henry
Lee, brother of Bruce Lee Ken
nedy. Bruce and her husband,
John, are now publishing the San
Diego News, he says.
Miss DeHoven
Becomes Bride
Dr. and Mrs. S. Farley Acree
announce the marriage of their
daughter. Ruby DeHaven, to Mr.
Harry George Clement.
The wedding took place Satur
day at All Souls Unitarian
Church.
Mr. and Mrs. Clement will make
their home at 2449 P street
Anniversary Party
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Belnick
were entertained yesterday at a
family dinner at the Statler Ho
tel in honor of their 40th wed
ding anniversary.
MISS McGVlGAN.
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Moore
McGuigan of Beckley, W. Va., an
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Nancy Lee, to Dr. Harry
Edwin Farver, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Robert Farver of
McLean, Va.
Miss McGuigan is employed at
the Beckley Hospital where Dr.
Farver is resident surgeon. Dr.
Farver is a graduate of the Uni
versity of Virginia.
Club Officers
To Be Feted
Mrs. Hoyt 8. Vandenberg, wile
of the Chief of Staff of the United
States Air Force and honorary
president of the Air Foret Officers’
Wires' Club, will entertain new
officers and oomatttee chairmen
of the clfib at a luncheon at noon
Wednesday in her quarters at Fort
Myer.
After the luncheon Mrs. Charles
Wesley Schott, the club’s new
president, will conduct the first
meeting of the new executive
board.
Additional guests will include
Mrs. Lauris Norstad. honorary vice
president, and Mrs. Merrill D.
Burnside, immediate past presi
dent.
The club's new committee chair
men have been announced as fol
lows: Mrs. Clifford A. Sheldon, in
ternal relations; Mrs. Harry Beres
ford, personal service; Mrs. Bryant
L. Boatner, Arlington Cemetery;
Mrs. Harry Q. Armstrong, hospital
liaison: Mrs. James R. Andersen,
hospitality; Mrs. Joseph Smith,
flowers and hospitality; Mrs. Har
old C. Donnelly, membership; Mrs.
Frank F. Everest, program; Mrs.
Aubry L. Moore, ways and means;
Mrs. C. Pratt Brown, club arrange
ments; Mrs. Maurice S. Dilling
ham, hostesses, and Mrs. George
B. Green, public relations. Mrs.
Dale D. Brannon was appointed
purchasing agent.
New President
To Take Office
Mrs. Dorothy Betts Marvin, na
tional president of the League of
American Pen Women, will install
Mrs. Evelyn Booth Moore as presi
dent of the District branch at a
meeting to be held tonight at the
branch studio on Columbia road.
Mrs. Moore will succeed Miss Clara
Manderschied.
Following the installation. Mrs.
Ellamay Colvin Thomas, retiring
state president, will install Miss
Manderschied as her successor.
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Tilton, chair
man of the advisory committee of
the branch, will present a gift to
Miss Manderschied as a token of
appreciation for her services dur
ing the past two years. The retir
ing branch president also will re
ceive a scrapbook of press clip
pings recording the events of her
administration from Mrs. Flor
ence Wallace, the publicity chair
man.
Mrs. Moore will be the guest of
honor at an executive board
luncheon to be held Saturday at
the University Women’s Club. She
will announce committee chair
men for the coming year at the
luncheon at which Miss Ruby Nev
ins will be the hostess. *
Junior League Set
For Final Meeting
The Junior League of Washing
ton will hold its final meeting of
the season at 2:30 p.m. Wednes
day at the home of Mrs. Edward
W. Fay, 2934 Edgevale terrace. The
business session will be followed
by a tea to introduce the new pro
visionals.
Mrs. Howard Heun, vice presi
dent of the local league, will re
port on the recent conference held
by the Association of Junior
Leagues of America at Sun Valley,
Idaho. Mrs. Heun attended as a
delegate.
FAREWELL GIFT.
Mrs. Eliahu Elath, wife of the former itml>auador of Israel,
who will sail this week with her husband for his new post in
London, receives an album of photographs from Mrs. Theodore
Shapiro, president of B'nai B’rith Women, Argo. The album is a
photographic record of events in which Mrs. Elath has partici
pated with the organization. —Nate Fine Fhoto.
Women's Clubs
/ ,000 Due to Attend 14th Convention
Of the Navy Mothers Clubs of America
The 14th national convention of
the Navy Mothers Clubs of Amer
ica will be held in Washington
June 19-23 at the Mayflower Ho
tel. with approximately 1,000 del
egates and visitors expected to at
tend.
A feature of the sessions will be
the celebration of the 20th anni
versary of the organization, which
now has 526 clubs in 47 States.
The program also will be linked
with the District of Coumbla’s
sesquicentennial observance.
Special honors will be accorded
the organization's founder, Mrs.
Emma Jones. McAllen. Tex. Mrs.
Jones chartered and incorporated
the first Navy Mothers Club in
McAllen in June, 1930.
The presiding officer will be the
national commander of the clubs.
Mrs. Charles Peterson of Phila
delphia.
Convention arrangements are
being made by the Washington
club, with the Maryland and Vir
ginia groups as co-hostesses. Mrs.
Louis M. Sheers, commander of
the Washington organization, is
general chairman. A past com
mander, Mrs. Walter Bohnstengel,
is the co-chairman.
Registration will begin at 9 a.m.
on June 19 and the opening events
that night will include a reception
at 7:30 p.m. and a ladles minstrel
show staged by the Philadelphia
club. The first business session will
take place the following morning.
Two convention highlights will
take place on the 21st. In the
morning delegates will make a
pilgrimage to Arlington Cemetery,
where a wreath will be laid on
the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
and a plaque will be presented for
the trophy room. A formal ban
quet will be held In the evening,
with the Maryland clubs acting
as hostesses.
Officers will be elected on tha
22nd and final business will be
taken up on the 23rd.
A number of Washington mem
bers are In charge of the various
committees. Mrs. Harry L. Mead
er, national public relations chair
man, and the first commander of
the Washington group. Is In
charge of convention publicity.
Other chairmen Include Mrs. R.
A. Crump, sightseeing; Mrs.
George Schmelz. hostesses and in
formation; Mrs. Wyman Chad
wick, program; Mrs. William N.
Meggs, reception, and Mrs. Ger
trude Harris, exhibits.
The Navy Mothers Clubs of
America are made up of tha
mothers of both officers and en
listed personnel serving in tha
Navy, Marines and Coast Guard.
The organization carries on an
extensive welfare program. In
cluding aid to needy Navy families
and service to veterans’ hospitals.
Miss Adorns
To Be Wed
The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. William
B. Adams of Rockville announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Lucille Jeannette, to Mr. Walter
Prank Malmborg of DeLand. Fla.
The wedding will take place June
5 in the Baptist Church on Court
House Square in Rockville, the
bride’s father officiating.
Miss Adams is a graduate of
Stetson University. DeLand. Fla.
and is a member of Zeta Tau
Alpha sorority. Her fiance is a
graduate of the University of
Florida. Gainesville. Fla., and is
a veteran of World War II. He is
a member of Pi Kappa Phi fra*
ternity.

MHnHniRMHnHH
| Modern Marriage
By Dr. Paul Popenoe
Peggy Jo and her parents are in
conflict on proper hours for dates.
Their family is not the only one
in which the question is being de
bated.
“Parents don’t seem to realize
that times have changed,’’ Peggy
Jo complains. “Parties start later
than they used to. They are often
farther away so it takes longer to
get there.
“If I have a good time at a
party, I want to stay longer. If I
haven’t had a good time, I want
to go somewhere else after the
party and have a little more fun.
I can’t always know when I'll get
home, and I think it’s unreason
able of parents to expect me to
know.’’
The chances are, Peggy Jo, that
you’ll be unreasonable, too, when
you are a parent! Let me suggest
a few steps to reduce the dis
agreement:
1. Talk' it over at leisure some
time, in a family council. Don’t
wait until you are leaving the
house.
2. Try to work out a general
policy. School nights will of
course be in a different class
from Friday and Saturday nights.
3. Be prepared to make some
compromise. For example, parents
j would probably prefer that you do
not go out at all on school nights.
4. You’ll And it to your advan
tage to get some of the more ma
I ture and responsible boys and
i girls in high school to work with
you in getting affairs started on
time.
5. When your date calls for you.
take the initiative in putting the
agreement on record in his pres
ence and that of your parents.
6. Finally, keep your word,
Peggy Jo—at least to a reasonable
degree! If you say 11 and actually
show up at 1:30, you will weaken
your bargaining power. You can
say. “Hurry up—Joe and I have
to leave in 20 minutes.” This will
also give some of the other girls a
chance to get under way.
(Copyright .I960. John T. Dill* Co.)
ADVERTISEMENT. ADVERTISEMENT.
New-shape wing sleeves—news
because they’re cut so extra-deep and
roomy. Designed to allow you free-as
a-bird motion.
^The new-shape Modes* box—news
because it, too, allows you a wonder
ful free feeling... freedom from embar
rassment. The box is cleverly shaped
like many kinds of boxes... but not like
a napkin box! You'd never guess what's
in the wrapped package. Another tact
ful feature—boxes are wrapped before
they even reach your store.
Same number of fine napkins. Same
price. Regular, Junioi
Super Modess sizes.
/ OkJfy fad* . ^
GLuJu
XM, oki Vuro^UL'
*
Julius Garfinckel & Co.
F Street mt Fourteenth • Massachusetts Avenue mt 49th

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