OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 15, 1951, Image 18

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1951-12-15/ed-1/seq-18/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-18

Contract Bridge
By Easley Blackwood
Bridge humanlcs apply to the
play as well as to the bidding.
Take the matter of opening leads,
for example. Against the three
no-trump contract in today’s hand
Mr. Champion decided to open the
ten of diamonds.
South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH (Mrs. Keen)
* Q 7
(2 K J 8
0 A543
*6542
WEST EAST
(Mr. Champion) (Mr. Muzzy)
* A 9 8 2 *843
S>653 (2 10 9742
0 10 7 0 K 9 6
* AQ 9 3 *108
SOUTH (Mr. Dale)
* K J 10 5
<2 AQ
0 Q J82
* K J 7
The bidding:
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
Now, with a fine partner this
lead would have been read for just
what it was, the top of nothing.
It would have done the defense no
harm and it might have been a
killer.
The usual lead against a no
trump contract is the fourth high
est of the leader's longest and
atrongest suit. This is especially
true where the suit is of five cards
or more and the leader has one or
more entries.
Decided On Play.
Holding no suit of five or more
cards, Mr. Champion decided it
might be more advantageous to let
Mr. Dale lead clubs and spades up
to him. So he opened the ten of
diamonds, the trey was played from
dummy and Mr. Muzzy won with
the king.
He promptly led back the nine of
diamonds. Mr. Dale won, knocked
out the ace of spades, and easily
made his contract.
"What are we playing—Nullo?’^
•creamed Mr. Champion. “Why!
would you return a diamond when'
you knew I didn’t have anything in
the suit? Return a club and he’ll
never make it.”
“I was returning your lead.” re
plied Mr. Muzzy. "What more do
you want?”
“I want some co-operation,” Mr.
Champion stormed. “How could we
beat him in diamonds. I only had
two of them.”
“That’s what you get for making
•uch a lousy lead.” said Mr. Muzzy.
Mr. Champion was right in saying
a club shift at trick two would have
defeated the contract. But he had
only himself to blame for choosing
the diamond opening.
While it might have been tech
nically right, it was a lead that he
knew' Mr. Muzzy did not under
stand and did not know how to
handle.
Everybody knows Mr. Muzzy al
ways returns his partner’s lead.
Mr. Champion should have opened
a club. That would have beaten
the contract, too.
(Copyright. 1961. General Future* Corp.)
I-1
X One-Minute Test of Your
News Knowledge
NEWS QUIZ
By Tom Henry
1. FLIERS—Why is a four
man crew of an American
transport plane being held in
Communist Hungary?
2. OBIT—The Senate's Re
publican floor leader died re
cently. Can you name him?
S. BOOKIES —How many
of the estimated 17,771
United States gamblers ap
plied for the new Federal
gambling tax stamp?
4. DROPPED—Who is "Old
Reliable,” whose contract as
coach was not renewed by the
New York Yankees?
5. QUOTE—What architect
of the Japanese peace treaty
said: "The Americans in
Japan will cease to be there
as conquerors and rulers.
They will be dealing with
the Japanese as sovereign
equals?”
Answers.
1. The Communists accuse
them of planning to pick up
spies in Yugoslavia and drop
them in Russia. 2. Fifty-nine
year-old Kenneth S. Wherry
of Nebraska. 3. Only 7,706.
4. Tommy Henrick, who has
been with the Yankees since
1937. 6. John Foster Dulles.
Tom Henry’s “Quiz’ Em”
appears every Sunday in This
Week Magazine with The
Star.
for o corsage of distinction
ask for...
BIANCH1
CAMELLIAS
from your local florist
WATER HEATERS pj
Day or Night
STerling 6100
IDEAL GIFTS ARE
Photo-MoTle Supplies
Easy Terms-Trade Ins
Park Frw. Frta Catalogue
COMPLETE PHOTO DEPT. 8TOBE
r ~
LHsKm Wsnrsst;
Wood or AIhrIrrri 8arag«s
IUY AT OUR FACTORY- SAVE $$$
10x20_$350
12x20_$395
14x20_$450
20x20 ... $595
f. s. fe. slant
Prices sre-eit enlr. »** Ur *'“
Ins*. AM ID* '
otis aaiii-aaiT
an Balldlesi Made Is Oar Ows Taeterj
rsvB^n.,i' Bsrwuar
nMCBB—iTBBL AMD WOOD
Conan**—Cabins—UHirty Bldgv
RINERAL INDUSTRIES INC
Santa and the Magic Mirror
By Luerect Hudgins
SYNOPSIS: Belinda and Tommy aat
out to vlait the Horrible Hobline.
Santa lends them a sled and whispers
two maiic words In their ears: one to
make the sled go swiftly to the Hob
lins' castle; the other to get them up
a chimney. Soon the hideous castle
of the Horrible Hobllns stands before
them.
CHAPTER 11
Never had the children seen a
building so dark and gloomy as
the giants’ castle at the foot of the
hill.
“1 cant help being afraid,” whis
pered Tommy as he stared down at
the place.
“I feel the same,” said Belinda.
‘‘But it must be all right or Santa
would not have let us come.”
"Anyway it’s too late to turn back
now” sighed Tommy.
He was right for the sled was
zooming down straight to the door:
of the castle. When they stopped
III 1 ^ . ..a a All i _
shyly. "He says you used to be
mean—and not so long ago either.”
"Oh, my!” groaned Walter. “I
can't bear to think of how mean
we used to be!"
Belinda leaned forward. "Do
please tell us,” she begged. "What
caused you to change your ways?”
“You see,” put in Tommy, “if you
tell us your secret we will tell it
to my father and then perhaps he
will become kind and have Be
linda’s father freed from Jail.”
But the giants said they did not
know the secret. They had visited
one morning at the Frozen Pond of
Winnie the Witch and from that
day they had found no pleasure
in being mean.
How They Were Tired.
“Sometimes, though,” said Wal
ter, "we feel the old meanness com
ing back. We go off alone for a
few minutes and the mean feeling
They peeped out from behind the draperies and saw one of
the Giants striding toward them.
they were instantly surrounded by
seven giants. They were twice as
large as ordinary men and, what
was even more fearful, 10 times as
ugly as the ugliest of creatures.
The children trembled and clung
to one another not daring to speak.
For a long moment there was not a
sound. Then one of the giants
opened his mouth and thundered:
“Cook my goose! What extraor
dinary visitors!”
“Hush your loud mouth, Walter!”
ordered a second giant. “You are
frightening the little things.”
“I was just so glad to see them,”
protested Walter. He turned his
voice down as soft and low as he
was able and said, "Oh, I Just love
visitors !*’
“So do we all,” said the other
giants. “Do come In and visit with
us.”
It Was Cold and Gloomy.
The giants led the children into
the great castle. It was as cold and
gloomy inside the castle as out
side but the giants themselves were
cheerful and pleasant.
All the giants were, In fact, so
kind and so eager to please that
Belinda and Tommy soon forgotj
their fears. In a little while they
no longer noticed the giants’ ugly
faces. All that mattered was their
klndness.
“Oh, you are good!” Belinda sud
denly burst out.
"It’s fun to be good,” agreed the
giants.
“But Santa says you were not
always like this,” said Tommy
lasses. We cannot say why for we
io not know.
That is all the giants would say.
*nd now they were tired from their
leavy dinner. They lay down on
he floor before the fire and began
lo doze. The children were left to
entertain themselves.
"I am thirsty," said Tommy.
"Let us look for water,” said Be
inda.
They left the fireside and wan- 1
iered off looking for the kitchen.
But though they looked in room |
ifter room they could not find the j
kitchen.
Presently they came to a closed
ioor. Belinda started to open it
Out at this moment they heard
some one coming down the corridor.
"Maybe they won't like us wan
dering around by ourselves,” whis
pered Tommy. “Let's hide!”
Quickly the children scrambled
behind some wall draperies. They
peeped out and saw one of the
giants striding toward them.
He was scowling. He went into
the closed room. In a few mo
ments he came out and now the
scowl was gone. He hummed softly
to himself as he walked awBy. ,
"How strange!” said Tommy.
Belinda clasped his hand in sud
den excitement. "I’ll bet the secret
we want is in that room!” she cried.
"Come! Let’s see.”
They tiptoed from their hiding
place and crept to the door. Be
linda’s heart pounded and Tommy's
knees shook as they softly turned
the knob and entered the room.
(Next: The Mirror.)
<AF Ntwf—tar—.>
CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
HORIZONTAL
1 Bulgarian
coin
4 Female horses
9 To silence
12 Wing
13 Lift spirit of
14 Female ruff
15 Corsairs
17 A yawning
abyss
19 Muck
20 Valise (U. S.)
21 Small plug
used to stop
a vent
23 Simulate
26 A Dutchman
27 Lures
28 Sloth
29 Worthless
leaving
30 Ruminant’s
stomach used
as food
31 Room in a
harem
32 Bone
33 Hogs
34 Seed covering
35 Bowling-alley
game
37 Growls
38 Repose
39 After awhile
40 Vigilant
42 Parasites
(coloq.)
45 To free of
46 Trojan hero
48 Consume
49 Paid notice
50 Thick
51 Vessel’s
curved
planking
VERTICAL
1 Once around
track
2 Man’s name
3 Troublesome
animal (dial.)
4 Distance
measure
5 Opposed to
aweather
Answer to Yesterday's Puzzle.
6 Ethiopian
title
7 French for
“and"
8 Hide
9 Fruit
10 Roman bronze
11 Jewel
16 Is 111
18 Strikes
20 To grumble
(colloq.)
21 Discharge a
weapon
22 Analyze
grammatically
23 Aches
34 Lowest point
25 Clock facet
27 Salty
solution
30 Warped
31 Fruit (pi.)
33 To box
34 In a short
time
36 Requires
37 Bird
39 Mineral
spring (pi.)
40 A macaw
41 Cover
42 Chinese coin
43 Bring forth
44 Pigpen
47 A direction
Points for Parents —By Edyth Thomas Wallace
Whether we can see only from our own viewpoint or are able
to see from that of others may be reflected in our choice of
Christmas gifts.
Mother—You love costume Jew
elery but Alice evidently doesn’t
for she never wears any. What
do you think she would like?
»
>\
Not This
I
Mother—Buy your friends some
thing that you’d like to have
yourself. That’s the rule I always
follow when I am buying gifts.
p
p
G
0
< QoPf < *( THE65 NOT )i Atf $A1AU, PETIT 5£APVE IlfFmeuZ 60NATA WEEU H
^SnTgecogpoj^unh V^^rS; \ SJSpT, M'sieue / Foe lebtle neck Aieo. IfgL accept these -— «
SONATA PKO(?POUGHT^ V A POgKg*s.piNE9?V AM SA1AU.TINYSHlgT MV GCCPUPST SAX£' \
^ iSs^AjMT ) L5BUg 0OCKET5 p WEETH COLLAg 50 ^0
MAM^LLfe )&WL l AN* Tf»U6Alg// Mpse SOMPPHy... W^&F 70%H£*is? ]
I |9 ‘ WHgNOPPDgTUNiTV pggg
B
U
z
{
7 HO!
fzA2
SAZAROF STILL STRUGGLES
TO HIDE HIS ANGER,
llllliESSmuUmmH m TAKc . nc rr'M CNER HERE.'' ^OH^/E^^4a*/'DOrNrT^^PoM^7EPAEAREe
IjyT/ S^VA^Vflllf I J^f:rr^C^SJAN/ HAND'OFF* L MANCHESTER t RUN OFF AGAIN f T JUST \ W/DES/DES
»£/VA?Ts£/*\ ££E£T, M,-^ WANT TO BE FRIENDS .'... } AND WLLWE
COMING /,R f>f<r ^AREMDU->J ^WPLACE ^ JA3fSOW...„. LET’S TAKE THE AFTER* ( OFF AWDGOFOf?
Ot£2=R>JslJ#3JM MMtm 1 HOPE Hi NOON OFF AND GO FOR k A SPIN PK5H?
B
E
E
T
l
E
B
A
I
l
E
Y
ATTENTION,
EVERYBODY//
RETREAT IS
^^DUNPING/^ £
( RETREAT IS
[ OVER NOW
£>1 hey/
ns™*
Tn'ZZZlXfifiE WWa —i'llTN'-$Sz21Kr} favMe* 3£EP
\™.eoRA ***- •' imsk / 35^Ws^w^7 f ****,r s/7^ppy-/
T
H
E
C
I
S
c
0
K
I
D
~ " N/2-./.T-*/
DON'T WORRVj BOSS / \
■ I WON'T TELL A SOUL (
M ABOUT MV SALARV/ \ ^
I'M JUST AS ASHAMED ) ^
M^j^QF (TAS VDU y-j \ jr
Take My Word for It By Frank Colby i Nature's Children - ■ By Lillian Cox Athey
Glendale: At our lunch table at|
school today we had an argument:
ts "y” a vowel? Also, are there any
words In English which contain no
vowels?—C. G.
Answer—"Y” is a vowel in words
such as myth, rhythm, hymn, etc.
In these words “y” is equivalent to
short “i.”
As for words with no vowels, “nth”
Is the only one which occurs to me
Just now, although there are others
which appear to have none:
Crwth, pronounced krooth, is
Naval Command Asks
Bids on Phone Building
The Potomac River Naval Com
mand has announced that bids are
being sought for construction of a
telephone exchange building at the
Taylor Model Basin, Carderock,
Md., and for replacement and ex
tension of steam and return pipes
at Bethesda Naval Hospital.
Bids will be received until S p.m.
Wednesday in the command offices
at the Naval Gun Factory.
4
/}
listed in Webster’s New Interna
tional Dictionary as “a kind of
ancient musical instrument.”
Cwm. pronounced koom, is a
word which means “a cirque; a
deep recess in a mountain.”
In both crwth and cwm. however,
“w” is a vowel having the "oo”
sound of "u.”
Pittsburgh; Can you tell me why,
in Spanish, "V.” is sometimes used
for the pronoun “usted,” meaning
"you,” as in the phrase, "Como esta
V.” instead of "Como esta usted
(how are you)”?—G.P.
Answer—It is an abbreviation of
the phrase "vuestra merced,” which
means “your lordship; your grace.”
Also used are contractions “Vd„ U„
Ud.”
Berkeley; Our class would like to
know why autumn is called "fall.”
It puzzles all of us.—A. N.
Answer—"Fall” is a good Ameri
canism, though it is considered
dialectal in England. We refer to
fall for the reason that it is the
time of year when the leaves fall.
As a matter of fact, autumn was
once referred to as “the fall of the
leaf," then later “the fall of the
year," and finally It was shortened
to “fall.”
I
Hessian Fly.
The Hessian fly came to this
country in 1776 and to date has out
witted all who have tried to liqui
date it. An enemy of our most vital
crop, wheat, it has cost us billions
of dollars.
They are canny invaders. They
emerge from their pupal cases at
night, find their mates in the morn
ing hours, and the females fly to
the young wheat to deposit hun
dreds of eggs on the stems in the
afternoons.
Among the troops coming from
Europe in 1776 were two brigades
of Hessians under Gen. De Hei
ster. who were sent to a camp on
Flatbush. These men, it is believed,
padded their mattress sacks with
fresh straw' from the wheat fields
of their native Hesse Cassel for the
long sea journey to America. This
may not have been the way the fly
invaded America, but the New York
farmers blamed them and proved
that no Hessian fly had been seen
in America before they arrived.
Two years after the arrival of
the Hessians the flies were ao thick
in the air they appeared as a cloud
coming over the Delaware River.
One Jonathan N. Havens, a New
York farmer, wrote that the fly re
sembled a mosquito, although it was
smaller and with a short beak. The
fly lives but a day or two, but during
this time it starts the cycle all over
again by laying its eggs on the
stems and leaves of new wheat.
The moisture in the ground, the
rainfall, and the ideal nights for
wheat growing are also perfect for
the Hessian fly. In these favorable
years there may be three to five
generations; otherwise there are
two.
The autumn brood attacks the
new wheat, often damaging the
plants to such an extent that few
plants have enough vitality to con
tinue to grow. The larva often
kill many plants outright. Quoting
W. B. Cartwright, the Department
of Agriculture entomologist who
really knows the Hessian fly better
than most. “We don’t really know
how the maggot of the fly eats. No
one can say for sure whether it
rasps the plant, chews on it, sucks
It, or punctures it.” All that the
distracted farmers know is the
beastly thing ruins wheat.
The first farmers used magic,
brewed herb broths with which to
fan them, using elder bushes, and
»
incantations, and even resorted to
burning the affected plants. Some
suggested dusting salt or ashes to
destroy the larva. Trying to find an
insect, animal or bird to eat the
larva was the consuming topic of
every farm meeting. Nothing has
seemed to completely eliminate the
Hessian fly. The only answer Is to
find a wheat the invader does
not like. The Russian-Portuguese
wheat crossed with thousands of
other varieties seems to be the an
swer. Starvation is the only way
to get rid of the Hessian fly.
Word Game
Find 58 or more words in
DAMNATORY,
meaning, “expressing condemna
tion.’’ Average is 53; limit, 40
minutes.
Rules—Words must be of tour or more
letters. Words which acquire four letters
by the addition of "s." such as "bats.”
"cats,” are not used. Only one form of a
word Is used. Proper names are not used.
A list will be published Monday.
Answer to DISPUTATIorg.
dais, ditto, dust, idiots, lota. said, sapid,
sadist, alst, soda, soap, spits, spats, spout,
spot, spud, stoat, stupid, studio, studious,
status, staid, stout, stop, stnup, suits, paid,
pass, pest, pious, post, pouts, puis, put.
taut, toast, toss. tout, toads, oasis, opus,
oust. adit. audSte

xml | txt