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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 15, 1952, Image 24

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The Passing Show
Miss Crawford Suffers Anew;
Sinatra Sings at Keith's
By Joy Carmody
‘THIS WOMAN IS DANGEROUS,” a
Warner Brothers picture, produced by
Robert 8Uk,_directed by Pell* Feist, screen
play by Geoffrey Homes and George Worth
lngton Yates, from a story by Bernard
Girard. At the Ambassador and the
Warner.
The Cast.
Beth Austin --Joan Crawford
g.r. Ben Hillock-Dennis Morgan
Matt Jackson -David Brian
Franklin -Richard Webb
Ann Jackson -Marl Aldon
Will Jackson-.... Philip Carey
Joe Crossland -- Ian MacDonald
Admitting Nurse_Katherine Warren
• 5r:, 5?an -George Chandler
Ned Shaw-William Challee
S“5»n -Sherry Jackson
McGill -Stuart Randall
Club Manager- Douglas Fowley
Oculist -Kenneth Patterson
Mike -ji- Harry Tyler
Hairdresser -Gladys Blake
Prison Matron _Cecil Weston
Like they say in the movies,
Joan Crawford is in trouble—bad
trouble—in “This Woman Is Dan
gerous” at the Warner theater.
Miss Crawford is an old hand
at trouble, to be sure, but even
she seems ill prepared for the
avalanche of catastrophe which
the script writers let loose in this
Warner production.
Trouble A, to run through them
briefly, is that she is going blind.
Trouble B is that she is the cats
paw of a murderous, insanely
jealous outlaw. Trouble C is that,
at long last, she falls honestly and
honorably in love with the sur
geon who restores her sight with
the prospect, of course, that she
will get him killed by the vengeful
criminal.
Trouble D is that only Miss
Crawford’s dyed-in-the-wool fans
will take the trouble to see "This
Woman Is Dangerous."
* * * *
The surprise of the Warner film
is that two men with such pretty
writing names as Geoffrey Homes
and George Worthington Tates
could have written such a bad
script. Authors with names like
that should be positively scintil
lating. No doubt this is what
Warner Bros, assumed when they
6igned the pair.
“This Woman Is Dangerous”
should teach them that Geoffrey
Homes and George Worthington
Tates are just words.
; * * * *
Most of the romantic melo
' drama, to give it a label, is shot
: against the background of a small
• hospital in Indiana. Here Miss
Crawford has taken refuge against
her tainted past, her absinthe
drinking Romeo, and her prospec
tive blindness.
For the first time in her life,
she finds herself in an environ
ment that is quiet, innocent, dedi
cated to the healing of mankind.
What is more, in the surgeon
played by Dennis Morgan, she
■ finds the man she missed when
she was a pure young girl in
Eaton, Kans., years before.
She would, naturally, lock out
all that had gone before, but how
is a woman to lock out an outlaw
lover who has cracked the safest
banks in America? He is always,
coming, this ravening beast played
by David Brian, and one day he
arrives.
There is the usual surface sheen i
on “This Woman Is Dangerous.”
■ Indiana looks like paradise in
front of the cameras. It also looks
a little like California, probably;
“MEET DAUNT WILSON." t TJnivenal
picture, produced by Leonard Goldstein,
directed by Joseph Pevney, story by Maury
Gertsman. At Edith's.
The Cast.
Danny Wilton.._...Frank Sinatra
Joy Carroll_Shelly Winters
Mike Ryan _ . Ale* Nlcol
Nick Driscoll._Raymond Burr
Tommy Wells-Tommy Farrell
T. W. Batcher--Vaughan Taylor
“Meet Danny Wilson” at Keith’s
is a movie in which Frank Sinatra
plays a cadaverous, offensive little
man who sings his way to fame
and fortune.
It is also a movie which might
be described as using half a mil
lion dollars worth of talent in a
$4.35 script. Miss Shelley Win
ters, representing four-fifths of
the talent value, puts up a teriffic
fight to lift the script’s worth to
at least $10, but even she finds
that effort futile.
It is possible there will be movie
goers who may confuse Danny
Wilson’s story with Sinatra’s own.
There are resmblances, true
enough, especially in the faces and
shape of the actor and the hero
of the film. Morever, this is
clearly not coincidence.
Nevertheless, this could not be
Sinatra’s story. The Danny Wil
son he plays is a heel, a kind of
two-bit imitation of “Pal Joey.”
He is cocky, dumb, pugnacious,
fancies all females as members
of his demented fan club, and is
sated from an early grave only
by virtue of a voice. Naturally, a
guy as bright as Sinatra would
never play a character like Danny
if he thought there would be the
slightest confusion in any one’s
mind as to which is which.
Miss Winters, who must be the
busiest actress in the world, is
the nearest thing to an assest
in the Universal-International
production. She plays a girl whose
instincts are so sound that she
falls for Danny’s ‘ piano player
(Alex Nichol) instead of the
crooning star.
She adds up to quite a busy
figure, pushing the latter away
and trying to pull the other into
her heart. She makes something
of an amusing act of this, indeed,
but the film treats it as useful
only to carry the story from one
Sinatra song to the next.
Maury Gertsman’s script makes
due note again that night club
owners are sinister, violent types
who are best played by actors
like Raymond Burr. This may
not be universally true but one
would never know it from movies
like “Meet Danny Wilson.”
There have been so many movies
like "Meet Danny Wilson.”
because the picture was shot
there. The hospital is a trim and
beautiful haven for the ill and
the peace and tranquility of the
small mid-western town would
jar Mayor Impelleteri.
Obviously, considering what she
already has suffered, this is the
place where Miss Crawford and
Dr. Morgan (Dennis) are going to
settle down at the fadeout.
A heroine cannot go on having
bad trouble all her life, like they
say in the movies.
a
J Current Theater Attractions
i I Where ond YY 11611 And Time of Showing
Stage.
Arena—“School for Scandal”;
8:30 p.m.
Catholic University—“The Cres
• cent Moon”; 8:30 pm.
New Gayety — “The Autumn
Garden”; 8:30 pm.
Screen.
Ambassador—“This Woman Is
Dangerous”; 1:05, 3:10, 5:15,
7:25 and 9:30 pm.
Capitol — “Lone Star”; 11:00
a.m„ 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 and 10:00
p.m. Stage: 12:50, 3:35, 6:20 and
9:05 p.m.
Columbia—“Quo Vadis”; 11:35
a.m., 2:40, 5:45 and 8:55 pm.
Dupont — “Rasho-Mon”; 1:00,
2:35, 4:25, 6:15, 8:05 and 10:00
pm.
Keith’s—“Meet Danny Wilson”;
11:45 a.m., 1:50, 3:50, 5:55, 7:55
and 9:55 pm.
Little—“Cage of Gold”; 5:40,
7:05, 8:35 and 10:05 pm.
Metropolitan—“Calling Bulldog
Drummond”; 11:30 a.m„ 1:10,
2:55, 4:35, 6:20, 8:00 and 9:45
pm.
National — "Man With My
Face”; 11:10 am. 2:15, 5:20 and
8:30 pm.
Ontario — "Detective Story”;
1:30, 3:40, 5:50, 7:50 and 10:00
pm.
Palace—“Phone Call From a
Stranger"; 11:15 am. 1:20, 3:35,
5:35, 7:40 and 9:50 pm.
Pix—’’Born Yesterday”; 2:00,
3:55, 4:50, 6:50 and 9:45 p.m.
Playhouse—“Woman in Ques
tion”; 11:10 am. 12:55, 2:45, 4:30,
6:15, 8:05 and 10 pm.
Plaza — “The Lavender Hill
Mob”; 10:50 am. 12:25, 2:00, 3:35,
5:15, 6:50, 8:30 and 10:05 pm.
Trans-Lux—“Two Tickets to
Broadway”; 11:30 am. 1:30, 3:35,
5:35, 7:35 and 9:40 pm.
Warner — "This Woman Is
Dangerous”; 11:15 am, 1:20,
3:25, 7:35 and 9:45 pm.
y..
Basketball '
I door ploy mM
i mod. » >°*J ^
[ 8% »«* No
I *“'« *»!*"
1 ••*•* 6 to li.*1*" *
FAMOUS CHICAGO RIHK ROLLER
SKATES
Reg. 19.95
Mounted on top
grade white leath* .
er shoes. Sizes for ■
girls and women.
Soecial low price
offer.
Made to
Order
'Lone Star' Has
Old-Style Gable
Role for Gable
MaMr^lctme^produced *by"z^Wayne
Griffin, directed by Vincent Sherman,
Capfto?1*y By Bor<,en Chase. At the
The Cast
Dtvereaux Burke-. _ Clark Gable
MfcTtha Ronds __ Aya Gardner
Thomas Craden-Broderick Crawford
Andrew Jackson-Lionel Barrymore
Mir.niver ryan -Beulah Bondi
Anthony Demmet —- Ed Begley
Luther Kilgore_ James Burke
Tom Crockett-William Farnum
Captain Elliott-Lowell Gilmoree
Sam Houston —-- Moroni Olsen
Maynard Cole —--Russell Simpson
*®lxette .. -William Conrad
Seth Moulton-Lucius Cook
Bud Yoakum-Ralph Reed
Gurau - Ric Roman
Pres Anson Jones __ Victor Sutherland
Ben McCulloch-Jonathan Cott
Mr Mayhew-Charles Cane
Vincente - Nacho Galindo
Sid Yoakum-Treyor Bardette
Dellman - Harry Woodss
Ashbel Smith- Dudley Sadler
Josh .- Emmett Lynn
By Harry MacArthur
It’s just like old times at the
Capitol Theater tills week. Clark
Gable has been givefi in “Lone
Star” a rugged role much like
those which won him movie fame,
and high time it is, too. This isn’t
as pretentious as some of the films
Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer has
thought fitting for the man Holly
wood calls “the King” and it’s all
the better for it. “Lone Star” is
just a well-made action drama
which gives Gable a fitting slug
fest opponent in Broderick Craw
ford and a proper feminine duel
list in Ava Gardner.
The screenplay by Borden Chase
is concocted of tried ingredients
and Director Vincent Sherman
has blended them with a sure
hand. Gable is cast as a Texas
adventurer named Dev Burke, who
fights the cause of annexation for
Andy Jackson and the promised
monetary reward of an Army con
tract for his beef. Ten years ago
at the Alamo he fought for glory,
but this time he’s out for the buck
and he doesn’t care who knows it.
His opponents, when he turns
up in Austin, are a powerful
rancher named Tom Craden
(Crawford), who wants to be
president of the Republic of Texas,
and the local newspaper editor
(Miss Gardner), who is opposed to
statehood for Texas because it
will mean war. It is Burke’s task
ta get to Sam Houston, off in the j
hills with the Indians, to get him
to speak for annexation in time!
to avert the treaty with Mexico
which would prevent it.
Writer Chase wastes no time in
"Lone Star” in getting Miss Gard
ner and Gable close enough to
gether that they give off sparks
and the poor girl editor has a
dizzy time of it from then on in.
She falls in love with Burke, then
sends Braden off to shoot him
when she discovers who he really
is, discovers she loves him in spite
of what he lights for, learns of
the money motive that drives him
and turns against him again, and.
so on and on. There is never any
doubt about the ultimate outcome,
but this girt does turn from hot to
cold and back again mighty fast.
mere is not mueh doubt, either/
about the outcome of the battle
between Burke and Craden, but
they don’t clutter this one up with
any changes of heart. Each of
them is out to shoot the other
dead at the first opportunity and
it never happens because one is
always turning up unarmed and
at a disadvantage. They do get to
a bang-up fight at the climax of
the “Lone Star” action, after a
private army rounded up by Cra
den stages a walloping small war
in an effort to stop a meeting of
the Texas legislature.
The mark of the formula is on
“Lone Star” all right, but it’s a
good formula for Gable and Di
rector Sherman has made it a'
slick and fast-moving movie.
Gable and Crawford wear their;
leading roles as if they were hand
tailored, which they were, and;
Miss Gardner is, well, decorative;
is a good word and occasionally
exciting are a couple of others.
* * * *
Several people of tested ability
lend their talents to the Capitol’s
stage show, among them Cy
Reeves, whose comedy style is al
ways dependable; Ray Malone,
who is one of the ablest and most
imaginative tap dancers around
today, and Sylvia Froos, whose
singing style also is a dependable
one.
AMUSEMENTS.
".mWMMITE pair!
p«?
SIMMONS
W Roth's LITTLE \J
I ynnnw itTWHH ucj
L.
'Quo Vadis'Awarded
$10,000 First Prize
By Catholic Group
•y the Associated Crest
HOLLYWOOD. Feb. 15.—The
movie "Quo Vadis” took the top
award of $10,000 as the Christo
phers, a Catholic organization,
made its annual presentations last
night to creators of works of "en
during spiritual significance.”
The $10,000 is to be divided by
Producer Sam Zimbalist, Director
Mervyn Leroy and Writers John
Lee Mahn, S. N. Behrman and
Sonja Levien.
The Christophers, dedicated to
the belief that individuals, acting
as individuals, can make the world
a better place, distributed other
cash prizes, $25,000 in all, to:
Television—“Amahl and the
Night Visitors.” an original opera
on NBC-TV, composed by Gian
Carlo Menotti, produced by Sam
Chotzinoff and directed by Kirk
Browning, who shared $3,000.
Radio: “Path of Praise.” NBC
Cavalcade of America Broadcast,
created by John Driscoll, John
Zoller and George H. Faulkner,
$3,000. .
Book: “The Greatest Book Ever
Written,” Fulton Ourslers story of
the Old Testament, $5,000.
Newspaper: A story written in
the Atlanta Constitution last
April by Reporter Celestine Sib
ley, a mother of three children,
$2,000.
Magazine: “See How They Run,"
an article in the Ladies Home
Journal by Elizabeth Vroman, a
teacher in a Negro school in the
South, $2,000.
The awards were presented by
Father James Keller, Maryknoll
Missionary priest who founded the
Christopher movement in 1945.
The money for the awards came
in contributions of $l to $10 from
more than 8,000 rank-and-file
Americans.
_AMUSEMENTS.
(FIND
WASHINGTON’S
BIRTHDAY
WEEKEND
in NEW YORK
Make maximum tue of this
three day holiday at the con
venient Hotel New Yorker
right at Penn Station. Air, bus,
B & O connections at the hotel
door; adequate parking and
garage facilities. Phone of
visit our Washington office
today for literature, rates and
immediate confirmation of
reservations.
Hom Mew Yorker
34th Strut tt Eighth Avt„
N»n York 1, N. Y.
Washington 412 AibM Bldg.
OHIm Encutivt 2111
OPENING MON* FEB. 18th
(ONE WEEK ONLY)
ART
TATUM’S
TRIO
— Featuring
SLAM STEWART
(4 SHOWS NIT ELY)
NOW APPEARING
MEADE LUX LEWIS
"Kina o/ Boogie Woogie”
biuTlong^lndhis
RANCH GIRLS
"Sophisticated HillbilUe"
PLUS
MAURITA GORDON
at the Piano
Continuous Entertainment
' 8:00 P.M. to 8:00 A.M.
Choice Foods—Superb Drink*
1405 L St. N.W. ME. 3444
I "FIRST-CLASS
MVSTERY
M ELLER"
O'Nem-Htm
••tarring ,
breathtaking yf
Jean Kentl M|
Event Inch a Lady ‘
... Till You Look At Her Record'
This Woman is Dangerous
»AN DENNIS DAV®
Crawford Morgan Brian
_ A *i«or Bros, ham
Hi Ate it AMBASSADOR-Doer. 1 o ntT1
WALTER PIDGEI
n wi v anun nr nsBiiuHn!
“CALLING ( at feowot io wosKSool 1
BULLDOG DRUMMOND" I
r
_*%Xtggg
AMUSEMENTS._ AMUSEMENTS.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY
“Howard Mitchell, Conductor
Smday, Feb. 17, Centitstien Nell-4 P.M.
Dorothy Maynor
One of the world's greatest sopranos as soloist
Mozart: Titos Overture; Arias by Mozart and Verdi (Miss Maynor);
Tchaikovsky: Francesca da Rimini; Vaughan-Williams: Fantasia
on a Theme by Thomas Tallis; Songs by Strauss and Dvorak and
Villa-Lobos’ “Bachianss Brasileiras No. 5” (Miss Maynor); Wagner:
Ride of the Valkyries. Prices: $1.20, 1.80, 2.40, 3.00, 3.60. Constitu
' tion Hall Box Office opens 1 P.M. Sunday.
Wednesday Evening, February 20, Constitution Hatt—8:36 P.M.
Thursday Matinee, February 21, Lisner Auditorium—2:30 P.M.

Violin Soloist
Barber: Essay for Orchestra; Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5;
Brahms: Concerto for Violin.
NOW. . . 0h« 40:IS
C£a*t As*
CABLE* GARDNER
^wCRAWFORD
Lionel BARRYMORE-beuiah bohoi
RAY MALONE
SYLVIA FROOS I
CY REEVES I
'vqggsiggBS&ESSSSffSEE^B^SEimR
^WOwToSTlDSi^J
• Brest Stars la Ike Eaterbia- j|
■eat Masterpiece ef Hte Year:
shir nn Kciua I
WINTERS MERRELWYNNl
hub am fl
WH REIRK- DAVIS I
IHnrcaI
HIJ
mmnT
h 1 h ~ Lv «j
IWTMmi • NETIBC8 •ttJfltMKI
MHM»p Mitt
mm— imbiihm asm-m b—uwu
iPWM———Mf^
Pkitl «M UlU
NEW GAYETY
NOW HAYING
_«mn UOOMQAtOtM ■
**l really
enjoy
dancing
with
MU
dancers.*1
gays DOROTHY f ARNOf*
Singing Star of “TH* KING AND l*»
** Dancing gives me a great deal of
'pleasure . . . and everyone I know
who hat learned at Dale does gJJ the
popular dances to perfection. When
friends ask me about dance lessons, I
always recommend the Dele Studies."
Complete, Private, Guaranteed
DANCE COURSE
Pox Tret, Rumba, Mambo, Walts, etc.'
Now reduced from $37JO to *1710
come in today tor a
FREE Analysis
No Appt. Needed
No Obligation
710 14th St. (nearG)
8th Floor, NA. 2402
Nationally Famous for over 20 years
Studios in Major Cities
11 A.M. to 10 P.M.
HERE IS
YOUR CHANCE
TO GET THE
BEST SEATS
SEND
MAIL ORDERS
NOW!
; Opening March 18th
! Only 7 Nites—2 Mats.
Res. Seat*—$2, $2.50, $3, $3.60, Inel. Tax
Send check or money order, state
number of tickets desired and price of
each. Enclose self-addressed stamped
envelope for speedy return.
ULINE Al._
A
Toni
4
Atf/
;
LAST 4 TIMES! MAT. TOM'W
Ths MuttriitM of Encash
Conwy I
“SCHOOL
for
SCANDAL’’
Or
RICHARD BRINSUY
mu
*«rtt -THRU HER OR A NORSK,”
the hilarious comedy If OsotfS
Abbott and Cecil Holm.
ARENA STACK
NATIONAL K!S
Walter In, Gears*
Ptfgaaa Bassett Saadars
"Bringing t* the Screen the Meal ln
a oa! Story of "THE MAN WHO
COVED HAVE KILLED HfTl.EE”
“MANHUNT”
hhMBSKLhehadmyooc
AMUSEMENTS.AMUSEMENT 8.
SOON—LOEWS CAPITOL
m. i
M-G-M’a
[ DANCING.
|L ON-AIR
MUSICAL
FRED ASTAIRE
and
VERA-ELLEN.,
&Xs 3MU cf tAew &oUe*u6mw'9icAnieo&t
"BEST FILM OF 1951”
VENICE FILM FESTIVAL AWARD
"IMPRESSIVE •.. a wonderful subtlety
~ BEST NUDIST HIM EVER PRODUCED
INTERESTING, WELL-MADE FILM.”
UnaSHAMED
Gil WEEK I
TODAY'S NEIGHBORHOOD MOVIES
GEORGETOWN 1M,ADWiU~ j
"The Community Art Cinema"
STEWART GRANGER
JEAN SIMMONS,
In a J. ARTHUR RANK Presentation
“ADAM AND EVALYN”
EXTRA. "FINGAL’S CAVE."
Doors Open 5:45 P.M. Feature at 6:10.
8.03 and 9:56 P.M.
CAROLINA HH,-ndiN.C7Ave.S.E.
"DEVIL’S DOORWAY." ROBERT TAY
LOR; "CLOSE TO MY MART.” GENE
TIERNEY.
raiBraY w**. v«- tu
m Free Parking
"ROGUE RIVER." RORY CALHOUN,
PETER GRAVES.;__
STANTON 6,h =? 4-9443 N E
VAN JOHNSON. ‘TOO YOUNO TO KISS";
JAMES STEWART, "DESTRY RJIW8
AGAIN."
VARY Savanah St. at 13th St. 5.E.
rlM“ 1 »lock off Ala. Ave. JO. 2-2233
ANN BLYTH. "GOLDEN HORDE.” Plus
“EVERY GIRL SHOULD BE MARRIED."
gyh ^Jackpots (or Appreciation Night.
^TATP Red Badge or courage.'
vlnlL With Audie Murphy, in
Technicolor.
ARLINGTON
Maureen O'Hara, In Technicolor.
WIT CAW Heflin, Patricia Neal.
miedUH In "Week Bad With
Pather,"
a COT A If “Mr Friend Fllcka.” In
ASaTUn Technicolor, With Roddy
McDowell.
Cl FBI1 “Flame of Araby." With
IllaUIL Jeff Chandler. Maureen
O'Hara, In Technicolor.
BUCKINGHAM in^Techn lcoior.
With Burt Lancaster.
IFPFFBCAV Technicolor Spec
JUMilPlin IiMf "When
Worlds Collide” Bee Karth Destroyed^
BVBTI Clifton Webb. William Lun
P1PH dlgan In "Elopement.”
Fair lawn Amusement Co.
HIGHLAND 2533LUPa ,A/3T,5 E
EDMUND O'BRIEN and FORREST
TUCKER In ‘'WARPATH.'' to Techni
color, at 8:15, 8:00, 9:50,
ATI AIInr Nichols Ave. & Atlantic
AiUUIlb s, s.E. JO. 3-3000
RICHARD BA8EHART to “FIXED BAY
ONETB." at 8:15. 8:05. 9:SS.
CONGRESS
BURT LANCASTER to “TEN TALL
MEN," to Technicolor, at 8:15, 8. 9:60,
ANACOSTIA &3 SPA
Double Feature. FRED MacMURRAY
to a Reissue of “SMOKY." to Techni
color. at 1:00. 8:55. 6:50, 9:45; PAT
O'BRIEN to "CRIMINAL LAWYER.” at
2:40. 5:35, 8:30.
milAI Marlboro Pike at Dist. line
WUBIUi H|. 5,5, Free Parking
BURT LANCASTER to "TEN TALL
MEN.” In Technicolor, at 6:15. 8, 9:60.
LAUREL
AUDIE MURPHY in "THE CIMARRON
KID.” to Technicolor, at 6:10. 8. 9:50.
CAPITOL
ALL-COMEDY NIGHT With the Three
Stooges. Tom and Jerry, Leon Errol.
Woo'* ’ Woodpecker, Walt Disney Car
toons. Our Gang Comedy and Many
Others. Complete Eihowa at 6:15 and
8:40.
!
' ■
HYATTS YULE Showf Featuring
All Your Favorite Cartoon Charac
ters. Two Hours of Fun and Laughs
With Pluto. Bugs Bunny. Popeye,
Mickey Mouse. Tom andJerry. Donald
Duck. Joe McDoakes. Goofy. Bdgar
g^ftheg"^»°d
CHEYERLY Feature. VfetPSlac^
Murray. "Bmoky" (Tech ), and Cesar
Romero George Brent, ‘TBI GIRL.”
,aat Compl. Bhow.8705._
Tomorrow, Pay-Day Matinee. The
nrst 600 boys and girls attending
matinee will receive a pay en
velope worth from 5c to S5. —
tesy of Sparkle Cleaners.
MARLBORO ^LJt ^FEATURE:
Joan Fontaine. John Lund. Mona
Freeman. “Darling How Could You?"
and Loretta Young. Walter Brennan.
“Kentucky (Teen.). Last complete
WARNER BROS. THEATERS
For Information Call Republic 0S09
AMBASSADOR }angeroue/'*Den- I
nls Morgan. Joan Crawford. 1:05. 3:10.
5:15, 7:25. 8:35.
AVALON Zttfi&SrSSflBEt.
ler. 6:35, 8:20, 10. Tomorrow—"My
Outlaw Brother,” also at 1:16 only.
“Roeuea of Sherwood Poreat.”
AVE. GRAND
,ct™“rr°n Kid,” Audte Murphy also
rl'Uo^11' B05r Ro,*r* 1,1 “to 0» Ama
CENTR ftl. h • Highwayman.”
jSQS ssft. «m-y>
Randolph Scott, 4:30, 8._
COLOHY Ipn Danaermw Ground?*
yf™i45d* Lupin°-Roi>ert Ry>°
KENNEDY
My Outlaw Brother" also at 1 p.m.
Only. Green Orass of Wyoming.”
pm "Ten Tali' Men.” Burt Lan
5.“*® caster. 2, 3:50. 6:46, 7:40.
savoy ;;8yxcg- ^
crrn “Bayonet Charge.” 6:20, 9:41.
55? at^flijS!**- W LuDdu“
SHERIDAN Sten^’^d1:
SELVES ^ fflfVW.!ft
7.40. 9:45. Tomorrow. "Cimarron
Sd also at 1 P.m. only. Bob Hope In
"Sorrowful Jones.”_
TAKAWV1 ^Double Dynamite.”
IIUtvnH Prank Sinatra, Jane
Russell. 7:20. 9:55. "Lets Go Navy”
Leo Gorcey. Hunts Hall. 6:15. 8:45.
TTVftf I “Tl>e Magic Carpet." Lu
llfUfclcllle Ball. John Agar. 2.
'1.45' &-V' 7:30, 9:35. Tomorrow.
“The Cimarron Kid” also at 1 p.m.
2u!« ,“The Llon Hunters.” Johnny
Sheffield.
IIP'l nV'N “Magic Carpet.” Lucille
• F,*-f-aU' John Agar, 2. 3:45.
5:40, 7:3o. 9:35.
APEX 48,3 Mo“- Avm- N-w.
WO. 4400
BURT LANCASTER, JODY LAW.
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the Orest Stsse Success
“DETECTIVE STORY”
DOUGLAS *PAmR BENDOK
1:15, 3:25. 5:35. 7:35. »:40. 11:40.
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DUTCHMAN. Color by Technicolor.
memi Memorial Mvd. A lit St.
IUUMB AIM. 4133
PATRICIA MEAL, VAN HEPUIL
"WEEK END WITH FATHER."
CENTRE ■fc»fr£**sjov«
SHIRUNGTON **«£“
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THE TILLAGE
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RICHARD BA8KHART. MICHAE
“FIXED BAYONE'

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