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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 01, 1953, Image 161

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1953-03-01/ed-1/seq-161/

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Basketball Brothers
THE HOLUP BROTHERS, John (left) and Joe, are as popular on the George Wash
ington University campus as they are on the basketball court. Here they exchange
pleasantries with Miss Barbara Connolly os they register for a school term.
ALL WORK and no play could make John and Joe less skillful basketball players, so they
relax in the game room of the Sigma Chi Fraternity house. Joe and Cheer Leader Lola Mathers
of Alexandria chat over a soft drink, while John ploys the accordion for Students Shirley
Brawn and Richard Creswell. S»or Photos by Clwood Baker; GWU Photo
i—THE WASHINGTON STAR PICTORIAL MAGAZINE, MARCH 1. 1933
PAGE 6
COACH BILL REINHART of the high-scoring GW quintet goes over the
lineup of the North Carolina State team with the brothers. Despite the two
brothers' spectacular play, N. C. State won two close games from GW.
r ANKS to two unassuming
brothers, George Wash
ington University may be on
its way to having its first
All-America athlete maybe
even two.
They are John and Joe
Holup, whose dazzling play
has made the GWU basketball
team one of the highest scor
ing collegiate outfits in the
country and has struck fear
into the hearts of rival play
ers and coaches.
John, 20, and a junior,
played on the team last sea
son, but this is the first year .
for Joe, who is 19, and a
freshman. Back in Swoyers
ville, Pa., their home town,
they led the high school team
into the State championship
play-offs with 29 straight
wins.
Then John came to GW
and Joe stayed behind to fin
ish high school. Last fall,
Joe also enrolled here, and
GW basketball records have
been tumbling ever since.
Early this season John set
a GW record for individual
scoring with 30 points against
West Virginia, but a couple
of weeks later Joe broke it
with 33 points against Duke.
New team records also were
set when John and Joe led
the way as GW scored more
than 100 points in three con
secutive games.
It has been much the same
story throughout the season,
which ends this week with the
Southern Conference tourna
ment at Raleigh, N. C.
Many think the brothers
sire certain to make the All-
Conference team, but others
have their sights set even
higher. They believe that,
before the boys are through
at GW, one or both will bring
the school All-America honors.
Like so many athletes, the
brothers’ conduct off the court
is the opposite of their dash
and verve while playing. Both
are studious, retiring and
quiet almost to the point of
bashfulness. In class, they
are better than average
students.
John, who is 6 feet 5 and
weighs 195, is majoring in
physical education. Some day
he hopes to coach, but a Navy
hitch may come first.
Joe is 6 feet 6 and weighs
215. He hasn’t decided on a
career. Both boys, however,
would like a year or two of
professional basketball.
“There is good money in
pro basketball, 1 " John says,
“and if there’s anything a fel
low just out of college needs,
it’s money.’’
Joe agrees.
. That’s one big reason an
All-America rating would
come in handy. It would
mean a better pro job later
on—when, “if there’s any
thing a fellow . . . needs, it’s
money.” —W.J.M.

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