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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 08, 1953, Image 41

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THE EVENING STAR, Washington, D. C. •
FRIDAY, MAY R, 1953
* Readers Clearing House BCTSY U C^WELL
BAZAAR.
(Mrs. C. T., Hyattsville)
In my home State I had
charge many times of our par
ish bazaar. At our first meet
ing in May, we would plan to
notify each member to be pres
ent at the last May meeting.
At that meeting we would
form bands of 10. Each band
. would pledge themselves to
raise $15.00. At the first Sept
ember meeting we would have
a bolt of pillowcase tubing.
Volunteers were asked to take
home as many cases as they
felt they could have completed
by November 1. Our bazaar
was usually the second week
in November. The members
stamped the cases or hem
stitched with a crochet edge.
We bought bright colored cloth
by the yard. We made break
fast sets of 6. (In the stores
four are the usual number in
the sets). The pieces were
hemmed or fringed.
Some older members would
raise house plants. In the fall
they would paint cans (soup or
fish) green, then dobe with a
small sponge, another color.
We could get 75 cents to a
dollar for these.
Another plan, to make quilt
blocks, by individual members.
Later put them together. In
our city we could get them ma
chine sewed in a fancy design.
We would sell chances on
them.
We found getting smaller
groups together in their own
houses, brought the members
closer together.
Wishing you all kinds of
success and thanks to RCH for
the kindness in helping busy
women to complete their plans.
(Mrs. J. E. J„ Silver Spring)
Our church in Silver Spring
has had what we called a
“Fund Fair” now for two suc
cessive years, with splendid
success in November. Our
women's society is divided into
circles of ten to fifteen ladies
each and each circle during
the year prepares articles for
a given booth they may choose
to sponsor.
There have been doll tables,
apron tables, candle tables,
cake and candy tables, white
elephant, green thumb, Christ
mas card and wrapping tables,
home-canned foods, jelly and
preserves, parcel post, fancy
foods and home-made soap
tables. Also a cafeteria where
R. HARRIS & CO.
invites you to see
cfiJeutelS'"
May 11th thru May 16th
Co.
f AND ELEVENTH STREET N.W.
JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS SINCE 1874
mpH™
1109 G STREET N.W.
PRETTY CAREFREE
"" f ißr
Yes, nylon, at this amazingly >■:». . ■
low price! Simply styled, the V j v'
better to be perfect for every \ | \ i
summer event .. . with bright \ l \ l
rhinestone buttons and easy \ \ \ \
full skirt. No-iron flock dot 1 \ \ \
sheer in navy, pink, light / ) \ \
blue, white or brown. j J \ \
SUMMER COLONY II A \
SECOND FLOOR I J V \
COME, WRITE OR PHONE NA. 8-7850
Add 2% D. C. Sales Tax Plus 25c Shipping Charge
Rinse out cream pitcher
uiith ujdler betore puthqg
cream m.Easier to clean.
just a snack or a full meal
could be bought, a turkey din
ner after 4 o'clock.
For the candle table, this
circle collected used candle
stubs and re-melted them into
new and lovely shapes. The
doll and apron tables explain
themselves also cake and candy
tables. The white elephant
table was made up of any good
articles even clothing, that was
laid &side in homes and not
in use. The green-thumb table,
of course was potted plants,
the ladies had raised during
the summer.
The parcel post table was
made possible by having cards
typed with a verse (original)
asking for a parcel post pack
age worth not more than a
quarter. Each member of the
society sent 4 or 5 cards to
friends asking each one for a
package. The package was
not opened, but put on the
table and sold for a quarter.
The packages went like hot
cakes.
One circle gathered up and
had members of the society
save all their grease for them
and they made a lovely white
soap also soap powder by
grinding some. The powder or
flakes was put into paper milk
cartons that have a corner
opening. One clever 1 husband
of a member designed a cover
for the cartons which was
pasted on all around it. An
appropriate name was given
the soap and the whole effect
was quite professional looking.
The circles did not confine
themselves to working for their
special table entirely, but often
had donations that were given
or made and were turned over
to the proper table selling that
kind of article.
I hope these directions will
be a help.
** * *
PHILODENDRON?
(Mrs. G. G. O’B., Silver Spring)
Can any one tell me what
to do for my philodendron? It
has brown spots and the leaves
are chewed.
** * *
WINDOW FAN?
(S. D., Arlington)
I am thinking of installing
a casement window fan in my
bedroom soon. Will some kind
reader tell me if they are suc
cessful in keeping room or
more than one room cool?
Also are they noisy? Please
let me hear soon before the
hot weather sets in.
SEEDS TO JAPAN
(K. R., Arlington)
In answer to the request for
i “seeds to a pen friend in
Japan,” I would suggest golden
i bantam corn as a food they
; seldom have. They have most
of our other vegetables and
i flowers. The growing season
i up there is equivalent to that
' of say Northern Michigan, late
} Springs and early Falls. I be
; lieve the Japanese writer might
; love a copy of the recent Na
tional Georgraphic with pic
: tures of Washington and
Georgetown. They have so
! much interest in pictures, post
| cards, etg., and the way of life
here in the United States.
When we were there two years
ago the mail order catalogs
were most fascinating to our
i servants and even to visiting
Japanese.
** * *
FIREPLACE
(Mrs. C. M. L., Washington)
To F. J. H.. Wheaton re fire
place in summer. I remove all
the equipment, storing it in
the attic, and then place my
card table there. This table,
which has a very pretty top
showing a scene of wood in
lays, rests on a stand with the
legs folded under. I don’t
think the stand is necessary,
however, as I believe it would
serve the purpose to lean the
table against the fireplace.
** ♦ *
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.
Information and requests
sent in by the following have
been forwarded to those for
whom they were intended:
Washington—E. P. K., F. P.
G. Mrs. M. 8.. Mrs. F. N. McN.,
Mrs. J. A. H., MisS L. H„ Mrs.
S. M. C., Mrs. W. C. M.. Mrs.
C. W. S., Mrs. E. W. S.. W. R.
E., Mrs. E. S., Mrs. S. C 8.,
B. G.. Mrs. M. E. J., E. F., M.
E.. Mrs. R. P. G.. C. 8., Mrs.
N. J. S.. Mrs. C. K. G.. Mrs R
H. T, Miss R. T„ A. K., Mrs.
C. M., Mrs. F. L. C., Mrs. M.
E. D., L. M. 8.. Mrs. A. M.,
C. L.. L. H. 8., Mrs. E. H. 8.,
R. H. B.
Alexandria—L. U. S., Mrs. E.
P. C. Arlington—Mrs. R. J. L.,
Mrs. F. McC., Mrs. G. B. F.
Beltsvllle—C. H., Mrs. J. H. H.
Bethesda—Mrs. E. E. C., Mrs.
B. F. S. Brentwood—V. P. B.
Bristow—Mrs. J. Y. Chester—
A. H. K. Chevy Chase—Mrs.
C. K. J.. Mrs. L. J. N. College
Park—Mrs. R. B. M. East
port, Md.—Mi's. A. J. Fair
fax—C. D. Falls Church—
Miss E. A., Mrs. E. R., E. W.
F. Mrs. E. R. Glen Dale—
Mrs. O. K. Hyattsville—Mrs.
R. H.. Mrs. B. H. E. Kensing
ton—K. C. L. Laurel—Mrs.
D. K. Riverdale—Mrs. M. H.
Rockville—E. P. K. Silver
Spring—Mrs. T. W. M., Mrs,
J. H., Mrs. J. S., Mrs. K. L.,
Mrs. F. S. R., Mrs. C. K. 8..
Mrs. M. Y. A. Takoma Park—
Mrs. N. J. D., Mrs. L. H. R.
Vienna —Mrs. S. P. West
Hyattsville—Mrs. I. R. S.. Mrs.
F. M. West Palm Beach —Mrs.
D. H. R.
Got a
Pocket Handy?
/ I |\
Here’s a novel “Stitch In
Time Saves Nine” idea—
an emergency sewing
kit, packed inside a
unique miniature G-E
Cleaner
Visit your G-E dealer for
a demonstration of the
G-E “Swivel Top” Cleaner
and get this sewing kit
as a gift.
SEE IT ON TV
.t.rrlnf f
Channel 4 - f ' ’.JJfv''
Wednesday
RBBHMf Ti
Ginoral Eltetrie Supply Co.
70S Idgaweod Si. N.E.
A division of G.n.ral Electric
Distributing Corporation
HUdson 3-6800
GIVE HER a Smart, New Bag
From casual country jaunts to town-trotting
. . . whatever her destination we’ve a bag
for HER in our wide collection at all 3
Ladies’ Shops of the YMS.
ln-H DOWNTOWN: 1319 F Street N.W.
NORTHEAST: 3942 Minn. Ave.
ARLINGTON: 3030 Fairfax Drive
GOLDFISH
OLD POEM?
(Mrs. A. R. H., Washington)
My experience with snails.
My black fantail fish ate the
snail* and it killed them. The
snails did not keep the water
fresh nor clear. It was cloudy
and slimy and the tank was
cleaned once a week. I use
fresh well water, no chlorine.
The fish need air.
I wonder if anyone would
know the old poeng about
(Rev.) General Israel Putnam
riding down some steps. It
may have been in dialect, as
the only part I can remember
is this: “When Putnam rid
down them air steps why
didn’t some one foller.”
kfa^rt**' l / oU/c4t
Lustrous Pearls*
Rich simulated pearls in necklaces and 1,
2, 3 strand chokers. Classic white or fashion
pink with rhinestone or pearl* clasps. Very
specially priced for Mother’s Days
GIVE HER ... a
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F<JUl PSp* LOUNGER
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DOWNTOWN: 1319 F Street N.W.
NORTHEAST: 3942 Minn. Ave.
ARLINGTON: 3030 Fairfax Drive
Meeting Set ,
By Federation
The 47th annual meeting of
the Montgomery County feder
ation of Women's Clubs will be
held at 10 am. Tuesday at the
Friends Meeting House, Sandy
Spring, Md., with Mrs. George T.
Condron presiding.
The agenda will include an
nual reports and the election and
installation of officers. Mrs.
| Thomas W. Fleming, newly
elected State president of the
federation, will be the installing
officer.
The drama section of the Sil
ver Spring Junior Women’s Club
will stage an original skit, “The
Bored Meeting.” by Mrs. Robert
T. Surine. Mrs. Ann Murphy
Wilson, president of the Rock
ville Junior Women’s Club, will
present musical selections.
Reservations for the luncheon
may be made through Mrs. J.
Dallas Grady, Mrs, D. Kenneth
Crook or Mrs. Hamilton Tread
way.
STORE HOURS 9:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.
\ WASHINGTON f
w
SEMI-ANNUAL
sample hat sale
• Showroom samples • Many one-of-a-kind
• Manufacturers' designs!
closeouts • Hundreds to choose from
4.45
made to sell for 7.95 to 15.95
The most exciting event in town . . . sparkling new styles in superb
milans, pretty lace hats, velvet and straw combinations. Large or small
brims and flattering shells. Plenty of white as well as wheat, navy and
black. Come early for best selection.
our own southern belle dimity
a breeze-cool, young coatdress design by Kay Windsor to
make you pretty-as-a-picture; strewn with
flowers and handsomely done in misses* and womens
sizes, our alone and only
8,98
White cotton dimity with rose, lilac or aqua
print, contrast piping, for misses’ sizes 12 to 20;
women’s sizes 14 Vt to 22 V*.
FREE PARKING 4250 CONNECTICUT AVENUE EMERSON 2-6700
I f 4 A

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