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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 15, 1953, Image 22

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THE EVENING STAR, Washington, D. C.
FBIDAT. MAT IS, 1983
The Passing Show
Gable Outwits the Russians
In New Comedy Romance
1 By Jay Carmody
Clark Gable is mixing it with Gene Tierney and the Rus
. aians in “Never Let Me Go” at the Capitol Theater and this 1s
clearly a combination M-G-M expects the public to go for.
Gable, in accordance with an old Hollywood custom, wins both
1 bouts but at the risk of a grimance from Senator McCarthy, at
j, least one spectator at the Capitol's opening suspected “the fix.”
With less of a scriptual tilt in
i his favor, the Russians might
have given him more trouble
just as they do the rest of hu
. manity.
i Regardless of any 111-tempered
remarks on the part of critics,
however, Metro can insist “Never
Let Me Go” is one of the month’s
timeliest movies. Its theme is
what to do about Russian women
who marry westerners and are
denied the right to leave the
homeland. It was this very sub
ject that Ambassador Bohlin was
taking up with the Kremlin on
page one day before yesterday.
** * *
The film Delmer Daves di
rected in England, based upon a
novel by Roger Bax, is one of
those that comes under the
heading of light summer enter
tainment.
It introduces Gable in the
eostume of an American corre
spondent in Moscow on VE day.
At that particular moment every
body in Russia loves everybody.
Naturally, the Russians are
not going to tolerate that at
titude for long. It lasts long
enough, however, for Gable to
tell a Moscow ballerina (Miss
Tierney) he loves her, too. They
marry, Moscow orders Jiim out
of the'country, and the rest of
the picture is concerned with
his plot to kidnap the girl so
they can live happily ever after.
** * *
Even with Gable giving a two
fisted performance as the out
raged husband, this aspect of
Russian inhumaity remains re
latively insignificant as compared
with dozens of others. Naturally
the screenplay makes vehement
reference to this form of bar
barity but the stress of the film
is on those aspects in which the
lionhearted hero is cutting down
the enemy.
Considerable emphasis also is
laid upon the comedy of “Never
Let Me Go.” As an irate Amer
ican on his honeymoon, Gable is
allowed to speak freely his opin
ion of the Kremlin’s savagely
Imposed customs. This helps give
the film a few spots of amusing
dialogue and so does another
plot twist which allows a Cor
nish sailorman to deliver a few
judgments on Americans.
It is rather a suspenseful cli
max that has been worked out
for the picture. In this, the re
sourceful hero hires an English
sailing boat to raid the shore of
Talinn in the Baltic, where his
ballerina bride has come to ren
'dezvous with him.
“Never Let Me Go” not only
Hollywood Diary
Garbo's Shyness
Put Up to Doctor
, Li... -- ... , By Sheilah Graham
HOLLYWOOD.
Maureen O’Hara has received
another big car the third
: from her admirer in Mexico City.
She was there in person to take
delivery.
Greta Garbo finally is taking
medical advice to - find out why
she’s scared of people.
Dr. Manfred Sakel, inventor
of the insulin shock treatment
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
And Time of Showing
Stage.
National "Stalag 17”; 8:30
pm.
Arena—" Arms and the Man’’;
1:30 p.m.
Catholic University—" Gentl
emen, Be Seated”; 8:30 p.m.
Screen.
Ambassador—“ House of Wax”;
, 1. 2:45. 4:30, 6:20, 8 and 9:45
P-m.
Capitol—“ Never Let Me Go”; j
11 a.m.. L’4s. 4:30, 7:15 and 10*!
p.m. Stage: 12:50, 3:35. 6:20 and i
9:05 p.m.
Columbia—“ Call Me Madam”;
11:15 a.m„ 1:20. 3:30, 5:40. 7:50
and 10 p.m.
Dupont—“ Leonardo da Vinci”;
1:15, 3, 4:40. 6:25, 8:15 and 10
pm.
Keith’s—" Man in the Dark”;
, 11:15 a.m.. 1, 2:45. 4:30, 6:15,
8 and 9:45 pm.
Little—“La Ronde”; 6, 7:25,
8:50 and 10:20 p.m.
Mae Arthur "The Franchise
Affair”; 6:20. 8:05 and 10 p.m.
Metropolitan “Mildred;
Pierce”; 11 am., 2:35, 6:10 and i
9:50 p.m.
Ontario “Jamaica Run”;
1:20, 3:30. 5:25, 7:20, 9:20 and
11:20 p.m. '
Palace “Moulin Rouge”;
10:45 a.m., 12:55. 3:10. 5:25. 7:40
and 9:50 pm.
Playhouse "The Star”; 11
am.. 12:40. 2:30, 4:20, 6:10, 8,
9:55 and 11:45 pm.
; Plasa —"You Can’t Beat the
, Irish"; 11:40 a.m., 1:25, 3:05,
4:50, 6:35, 8:25 and 10:05 p.m.
Trans-Lux —“Salome”; 11 a.m.,
12:50, 2:45. 4:36, 6:30, 8:20 and
10:15 pm.
Warner “Housj of Wax”;
10:30a.m., 12:20, 2:15, 4:10, 6:05,
8 and 9:50 pm.
AMUSEMENTS.
t«Si
| 1707 De Soles S». N.W. ♦
CALL "ARMANDO" ♦
4 Out Special Today 4
♦ LOBSTER FRA DIAVOLO ?
♦ CALAMARI LUCIANA ♦
4 SHRIMP POSILAPO ♦
♦ Wa«*ln«ta»'» iitni sad flneat T
♦ Italian watanrant aptelalitln* ta •
4 (In* »ad *a*«rt*d Italian dlihes ♦
♦ i MIXED DRINKS t
‘ NEVER LET ME GO." • Metro-
Golwjn-Meyer picture, produced by
Cierence Brown, directed by Delmer
Daves, screenplay by Ronald Millar and
Qeorae Froeschel. adapted from the
novel. “Come the Dawn by Roger Bax.
At the Capitol.
The Cast.
Philip Sutherland Clark Gable
Marya Lamarkma Gene Tierney
Joe Brooks Bernard Miles
Christ. Wellington Richard Haydn.
Valentina Alexandrovna Belita
Steve Qulllan Kenneth More
Commissar Karel Stepanek
Lieutenant Theodore Blkel
S. Mikhailovna Anna Valentina
Kuragin Frederick Valk
N. K. V. D. Man Peter Illing
U. 8 Ambassador __ Robert Henderson
John Barnes Stanley Maxted
Lemkov Meinhart Maur
Gen hadanov Alexia Chesnakov
was shot in England but man
ages to absorb something of that
casualness of mood that is so
helpful to English comedy melo
drama. Under Daves’ direction,
Gable is permitted to give a
rather relaxed imitation of his
old dynamic self. As the bride
from whom he is separated, Miss
Tierney is seductively beautiful
but more interesting well,
maybe—in her effort to keep her
Russian accent from slipping.
Among the other more solid
performances in the Capitol’s
film are Richard Hayden as a
former British sergeant who
worked with the Russians, Ber
nard Miles as the Cornish sailor,
and Kenneth More as one of
those off-hand BBC newsmen.
** * *
The Capitol has performed a
nice public service in bringing
Mias Lisa Kirk to town to put
grace, zip and a winning sing
ing talent into this week’s stage
show. Miss Kirk, for whom no
enthusiasm could be excessive,
has been delighting everyone but
Washingtonians since she made
her first big hit in “Kiss Me,
Kate.”
Miss Kirk’s superiority over
most singers this observer is
paid to listen to is her in
telligent awareness of lyrics.
In her formula these constitute
never less than half the song
and she both chooses and han
dles them with admirable taste.
The rest of the bill is com
posed of the Gaudsmiths, who
always have been funny: Dave
Apollon, a virtuoso on uncon
ventional stringed instruments
and broken English; and the
novelty routine of Fedi & Fedi.
Apollon has brought along Elaine
Ortlieb and her singing guitar,
an instrument that is popular
with a great many people, but
loathed by at least one reviewer.
—Nijinsky was one of his pa
tients—is at the Beverly Hills ;
Hotel, to handle a movie-colony I
case.
In spite of Mitzi Gaynor’s “It’s
nothing,” the romance with Jack
Bean is growing—or does no one
else call for a date?
#* * *
Debbie Reynolds’ present to
Rob Wagner on his 23d birth
day was a baked ham. .
Sound-alikes: Lauren Bacall
and Christine Jorgensen.
With 39 TV shows in the can.
Abbott and Costello plan to j
leave for London and the Palla- 1
dium next month. . . . And did .
Donald O’Connor sign a deal
with Raymond Stross to make a
movie in England during his;
TV summer hiatus?
Barry Sullivan is auditioning
cats to play Pyewacket in “Bell,
Book and Candle.” . . . Tough-
Guy Jack Palance takes ballet
lessons in his spare time.
Frank Sinatra’s fight with a
i photographer in Rome was pre
! ceded by a swing at a member
!of “From Here to Eternity” in
i Hawaii. .. $ Billy Grady, while
he’s in Europe, has bequeathed
his table at Chasens to Spencer
Tracy.
** * *
Bette Davis, pulling up roots
again, is. having her furniture
sent to Butternut, N. H. It’s the
most traveled stuff in the world.
Started in Butternut, then to
North Hollywood, Laguna, Mal
ibu, Los Angeles and now back
to New Hampshire.
“Why was Danny Kaye such a
; hit with the British?” I asked
! Daily Express Reporter David
Lewin at Bob Stack’s cocktail
party. "Because he followed
(See GRAHAM, Page A-23.) j
AMUSEMENTS.
OPENS MON., MAY 19
1»1 SHOWING SINCE B"WAYI
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th ta t ir
Uat 1 Tim**—'Arm* ft TV* Man'
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COLLEEN—Joan Kenny who plays one of the Murnahans'
vivid young in “You Can't Beat the Irish ” the skylarking
comedy which opened yesterday at the Plaza Theater.
'You Can't Beat the Irish'
Tells Highly Comic Tale
By Harry MacArthur
“YOU CAN'T BEAT THE IRISH.”
• n Associated British oieture. directed
b.v John Paddy Carstairs. At the
Plaza.
* The Cast.
Bartley Murnahaiu. Jack Warner
Bessie Murnahan— Barbara Mullen
Sallv Murnahan Jack Kenny
Norah Murnahan Elizabeth Ersklne
Derrv Murnahan Ronan O'Ctjty
Jack Murnahan Vincent Bell
Mattv McGrath Noel Purcell
Joe McGrath P»ul C®™* ll
Tubrldv Michael Dolan
Tom Cassidy Niall McGiimlss
Lorcan Alfl Bass
The human race, Irish branch,
hasn’t had such a highly comic
going-over in months as it gets
in “You Can’t Beat the Irish.”
This new film, at the Plaza, is
a refreshing experience which
you owe to yourself at the ear
liest opportunity. It’s full of
Barry Fjjtzgerald types and won
derful tongue-in-cheek humor.
The particular trait of the
race treated in “You Can’t Beat
the Irish,” is the deference to
the monied which is bred of
avarice. The screenplay’s cen
tral figure is Bartley Murnahan,
who is held in affectionate re
gard by his wife, two daughters
and two sons, despite the fact
that he is a more than some
what poor provider. He is an
affectionate father, a devoted
husband and the only man of
culture in the village. He can
quote Shakespeare for hours on
end. As someone remarks at
one point, “He doesn’t have to
learn Irish; he can speak Eng
lish so you can’t understand
him/’ But he doesn’t like to
work.
Well, things are in a sorry state
when the film opens. Only one
Murnahan son Is working and
AMUSEMENTS. AMUSEMENTS.
6th HIT WEEK
"Rita docs a gauzy strip that would
melt a wrought iron statue."
HAYWORTH • GRAN® jt
SALOME
J** ANORSON • Sr CM* HMOVKKS
M SYDNEWtoIn MfjrMTZ
Open 10:45 AM. TRANS-LUX 14th at H N.W.
RINK UMTS J |
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I *'* cM * ,Ti * Na *
4th and Final Week VETS
Now Showing ™ mm
o muruciAU Do r° u r,aUx# lhll 51650
o UlmtNolUll cash (including settlement
m«r|t4 tit ti* hot «m win costs) and $2.35 per day
Warner Phonic Sound wilt buy a 3 -bedroom
AUEHm Rockville, Nd.? I
wmnucoioi
—— Wltwil * f IB- Drive out Vierj Mill Ri. to Ist St.
WARNERsiomam i S'HSSStH
?V pi—T —«, A rioht on Horners Lane to our sign
Starts At 10 30 Starts At IP m at Crabbe Ave.: or drive out Wi*-
I -■ ; consin Ave. to Reed's Garage, right
i H block to Viers Mill Rd.. right on
! viers Mill Rd and cross bridge
now g j to /.«st iett on m st.
KuliLLLdiinuAMlillil or Phona Pmplmr 2-6108
TWO GMAT ATTRACTIOHS
Si. Jew mV* Auteur | W I This Akovt M. a 401 Homers LMI
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the grocer has just cut off the
family credit. An irate farmer
has refused to permit his son to
marry a dowry-less Murnahan
colleen. Then an American at
torney comes to town, reportedly
on the prowl for the heir to a
500,000 pound fortune.
\* * *
The head, of the Murnahan
clan, driven by circumstance
from contemplation of the book
he might write, gets himself
closeted with the visiting lawyer
for a couple of hours. He knows
he has scant chance at collect
ing the fortune, but the villagers
outside don’t know. Murnahan
just monopolizes the attorney’s
time, then sends him on his way
with a cheery wave.
He doesn’t say a word. He
knows he doesn’t have to. r And,
as he indignantly says later
when the truth comes out. “You
can’t expect me to go around
town denying every idle rumor.”
The reaction of the Murnahan
family to father’s new mood the
morning after the lawyer’s visit
gives “You Can’t Beat the Irish”
some of its most comic passages.
The grocer turns up with a mam
moth basket of food, talking of
Did. old friends, and Murnahan
orders him off the premises.
Finally the astounded Mrs. Mur
nahan talks him into accepting
the groceries and the 500 pounds
the grocer presses on him as a
token of that old, old friend
ship.
** * *
One Murnahan son decides
'Old Woman of 20
Scorned by Anno
By the Auodated Pnu
HOLLYWOOD.
Anna Marie Alberghetti, the
Italian singing prodigy, hur
ried back to Hollywood from
Rome for a role in “Red Gar
ters.”
She was here a few days and
then nixed the role.
“They wanted me to play an
old woman of 20,” she com
plains.
She’s just 16 and swears
she’s never been kissed.
“I want to stay in my teens
as long as I can,” she says.
“You get old fast enough in
this business without hurrying
It.”
he’ll go along with a gag and
says, sure, let’s buy the garage
and build a super cinema there.'
To his astonishment, the garage
owner happily sells out, without
even asking to see the color of
his cash. In no time at all,
the son is a partner in the con
struction business of the man
who had just laid him off. The
other son, advised by his father
to quit his job as a chemist’s
clerk, finds himself a partner in
that business in short order.
One Murnahan daughter, who
had been hoping to get a job in
a dress shop, winds up the owner
of the shop. The other daughter
ultimately gets her farmer’s son
Father even opens up an office
to take care of the investment
affairs which stem from the as
sumption by every one that he is
going to come into 500,000
pounds.
The comedy of this happy frolic
is equally divided between its
dialogue, its situations and its
characters. There is only one
word to apply to the leading
members of the cast—Jack War
ner as Murnahan, Barbara Mul
len as Mrs. Murnahan, Michael
Dolan as the scheming grocer,
Noel Purcell as the irate farmer,
and Elizabeth Erskine, Jack
Kenny, Ronald O’Casey and Vin
cent Ball as the Murnahan
daughters and sons. The word
is wonderful.
You’d better get to the Plaza
to see “You Can’t Beat the
Irish.”
AMUSEMENTS. j
toyi th« N. Y. Journal-American
f* MARK
m- EDMOND AUDREY M
win/ O'BRIEN - TOTTER '
SRKOKEims
f
ONTARIO—LATI SHOW TONIGHT—II:2O PM t
HMEU COREV r
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by TECHNICOLOR
t 3 ACADEMY AWARD WINNERS!
JOHN MAUREEN BARRV
WAYNE • OHARA • FITZGERALD
VHI QUIET MAM'
TECHNICOLOR
an i WALT DISNEY'S ACADEMY AWARD
I ■yn| p u Technical or Feeturette “WATER BIRDS"
LANGLEY SATURDAY THRU MONDAY!
New Ham*. * Cell. Uea
"One of the screen's most gifted and subtle comedians!"
SALEC GUINNESS..
AJ. Arthur Rank Organization Presentation 0
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In fc«r §reat»tl rolt I * "BIST SHORT SUSJICt"
THE AIR CONDITIONED
WEEK! PLAY HOUSE ,5t $X.*3-8500™
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2nd Week!
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“TAKES AN HONORED SPOT
AMONG BRITISH THRILLERS!”
MICHAEL V P * st OCI
the Ha»e? Dr /eiege.ne r#f
Extra! The Life of Queen Eliza
beth from Birth to Throne! wgJ
“ROYAL DESTINY" MmwffmttiW.M
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I * Clark GABLE *> [USA ~Mk
L GeneTIERNEY
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