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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 26, 1953, Image 4

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THE EVENING STAR
Washington, D. C.
TUESDAY, MAY 26, 1888
Navy Aides Debating
McCarthy's Demand
To Use Ship Data .
The demand of Senator Mc-
Carthy, Republican, of Wiscon
sin, that the Navy allow him to
use top-secret intelligence re
ports to prove his charge that
• British-owned ships traded with
Communist China threw the
...Navy into a quandary today.
It was learned that Navy in
formation. which when fitted in
*with public reports with Lloyd’s
rjot London, did in fact give the
Senator what was termed a “bill
of particulars.” The British In
formation Service demanded
auch a bill from the Senator.
Some Navy officials favored
"allowing the Senator to use the
Navy list—said to name about
100 British ships—with a request
that he not press to use the top
secret dispatches from which
the list was compiled.
, Would Protect Sources.
; The use of those dispatches,
-ft was pointed out, would neces
sarily reveal sources of informa
tion which intelligence chiefs
were most anxious to protect.
: At the request of the Senate
'lnvestigations subcommittee,
which Senator McCarthy heads,
:the Navy furnished it with a
list of the ships. However, this
j was classified top-secret and de
partment officials had expected
that the classification would be
irespected.
; Undersecretary of the Navy
Charles S. Thomas conferred
with the McCarthy group in
executive session yesterday. But
today a Navy decision on just
what could be declassified to bear
out the Senator’s charge still had
not been decided.
“We can’t wiA no matter what
the decision may be,” moaned a
top Navy officer.
Senator McCarthy said today
*‘rm sure we will” get permis
sion to name the ships, and to
publish details of United States
allies’ refusal to embargo ship
ments to the Chinese Reds of
goods which this Government re
gards as war-useful
Mystery still shrouded the de
tails, including extent of the
peace-making role reported to
have been played by Vice Presi
dent Nixon, but Senator McCar
thy, Vice President Nixon and
■other sources gave an account
of the incident. They said that
Senator McCarthy:
1. Sent a letter to the White
House Wednesday night or
Thursday morning asking that
Gen. Eisenhower say publicly
W'hat he thinks of allies’ refusal
to join this country in a com
plete embargo on trade with the
Reds.
2. Ordered the letter “stopped
at the staff level” in the White
House—which kept it from com
ing officially to Gen. Eisenhow
ers attention, at least for the
present.
Nixon’s Version
Senator McCarthy insisted he
never had authorized delivery of
his letter to General Eisenhower.
He said he is convinced now “it
would’be improper” to ask the
President for his views.
The Vice President gave re
porters this version of what hap
pened:
“I did discuss the matter with
Senator McCarthy on the tele
phone on Thursday. He on his
own initiative said he had pre
pared a letter but that he did
not want to have it delivered to
the President because he wanted
to discuss the matter further
with the committee. Under the
circumstances, the letter was not
delivered to the President.”
A highly-placed source who
declined to be quoted by name
said the letter did reach the staff
level at the White House, but
that a telephone call from Mr.
Nixon prevented it from being
handed officially to the President.
Ornaments for Sale
Israel wants to sell in the
United States preserved plants
and flowers for ornamental pur
poses, such as bouquets and
wreaths. Haifa reports.
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MRS. EISENHOWER VISITS WOMEN’S GROUP—Mrs. Oscar
A. Ahlgren, president of the General Federation of Women’s
Clubs, greets Mrs. Eisenhower as the President’s wife visits the
convention at Constitution Hall. —Star Staff Photo.
Federation
(Continued From First Page.)
when she said it was her personal
opinion that religion should be
an elective course in public
schools.
“I believe textbooks can and
should be written in co-opera
tion with Jewish, Catholic and
Protestant leaders. Faith in God
is our greatest asset in our fight
against communism.”
Back Independence Hall Project.
Mrs. Ahlgren said she wanted
every club to make the refur
bishing of Independence Hall,
Philadelphia, its primary proj
ect for the next year. She asked
each club to own an American
flag, recite the pledge of alleg
iance and pray at each meet
ing.
She proposed raising dues to
increase the,pay of the Federa
tions headquarters staff for the
upkeep of Federation buildings
and for services to member clubs
and clubwomen.
“We shall have to increase
our income eventually if we are
to remain the largest and most
influential group of organized
womanhood in the world,” Mrs.
Ahlgren declared.
Seven previously-adopted res
olutions were reaffirmed at to
day's session.
President Eisenhower sent a
message to last night’s opening
session, which also featured a
concert and broadcast by Paul
l Lavalle and the Cities Service
; Band of America.
I The President's message ex
tended greetings to the conven
-1 tion and read, in part:
"Because women are playing
an increasingly important role
in the public life of our coun
try, I am particularly pleased to
learn that ‘The Preservation of
Our American Heritage’ is the
theme which the many millions
of American clubwomen will
apply to their activities this
year.
“I wish them the very greatest
success in their important en
deavor.”
Nixon at Opening.
Vice President Nixon greeted
j the women in person at the
opening session and congratu
lated the Federation members
for the years of service the
GFWC has rendered in advanc
ing worthwhile causes.
He called the Communist
threat in the world and in
; America today’s greatest problem
and said people tend to view this
I threat solely from a negative
standpoint.
I “I’m anti-Communist," he de-
clared “but the negative side is
not enough. You have to be for
something.”
Mr. Nixon said he and other
leaders in this administration are
proud of the women participat
ing in Government and pointed
particularly to the records of
Senator Margaret Chase Smith,
Republican, ol Maine; Repre
sentative Edith Nourse Rogers,
Republican, of Massachusetts and
Representative Frances P. Bol
ton, Republican, of Ohio.
He also paid tribute to Mrs.
Oveta Culp Hobby, Secretary of
the Health, Education and Wel
fare Department, and to Mrs.
Hiram Cole Houghton, immedi
ate GFWC past president, now
assistant director of Immigration
and Naturalization in the Mu
tual Security Agency.
President Receives Bust
President Eisenhower today re
ceived a bust of himself executed
by Mrs. Margaret Paine of
Everett, Wash. It was presented
to him by Representative West
land, Republican, of Washington,
the 1952 National Amateur golf
champion.
Sure Shortcake Success
“ Kitchen /
m 1 I Sifted superfine through silk.
I |( y j I /That pre-fluffs Kitchen Graft
** I 1 II / / Flour... makes it blend more
I VI §;■ 7 easily and thoroughly with
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j. /
h fa*
Mftk& IttkU Line an 8' z9* z cake put
1 wjjri with waxed paper and sprinkle lightly with flour.
Sift together 1% c. sifted Kitchen Craft Floor, 1 ftp.
\ boking powder and % tsp. soH. Combine 1«. sugar and
until lemon-colored. Gradually beat in the flour mixture,
beating only nntil well-mixed. Mix in 1 tsp. vanilla. Fold
in 3 stiffly beaten egg whites. j
Pour batter into prepared pan and bake in a moderate
oven (375°F.) for 30 min. Cool slightly, and remove from
Ai pan. Cut through the cake crosswise, making two layers.
(AX/ WOilAj This can be served hot or cold.
0 Fill between layers and on top with strawberries,
fl 1 PPIITHV CTADF sweetened to taste. Frozen berries may also be used.
UAlJClVvill dlUtlL Serve with whipped cream.
| Federation Program 3 |
TONIGHT.
8:00 p.m. Processional —Executive Committee, State Junior Chair
men, Girl Scouts representing Troops 611 and 196, Camp Fire
Girls.
Greetings—Mrs. Roy F. Layton, president of Girl Scouts of the
United States of America.
Greetings—Mrs. William Harvey Young, board member of
Camp Fire Girls.
Youth, Our Greatest Resource—The Honorable Luther W.
Youngdahl, Judge of the United States District Court for the
District of Columbia.
Women’s Contribution to the Security of the Nation—Miss
Mary Pickford.
• Is Communism a Real Danger in our Colleges?—Miss Martha
Roundtree, moderator.
TOMORROW.
7:30 a.m. H-M Breakfast, District Room, Statler Hotel.
8:00 a.m. Classes (Constitution HaH.)
"Parliamentary Refresher.” "Revision and Bylaws.” “Public
Speaking.”
Call to order.
Washington’s farewell address—Read by Fred Drake.
Resolutions—Mrs. Horace B. Ritchie, chairman, Resolutions
Committee.
Reports of State presidents.
Reports:
Historian—Mrs. S. Blair Luckie.
History—Mrs. Mildred White Wells.
GF Clubwoman—Miss Gerry Sohle; Mrs. William Wade, junior
editor.
Public Relations—Miss Pauline Mandigo.
Legislative Research Director—Miss Sally Butler.
Assistant Treasurer—Miss Caroline V. Galvin.
Executive Director—Mrs. Stephen J. Nicholas.
Address—The Honorable Ivy Baker Priest, Treasurer of the
United States.
Reports of State presidents.
1:00-3:30 p.m. Luncheon workshop meetings:
American Home—Statler Hotel.
Communications —Washington Hotel.
Conservation —Washington Hotel.
Education—Mayflower Hotel.
Fine Arts—Washington Hotel.
International Affairs —Statler Hotel.
National Defense—Statler Hotel.
Public Affairs—Carlton Hotel.
Welfare —Willard Hotel.
3:30 p.m. Visit to Congress.
4:30 p.m. Tea, honoring International Delegates and G. F. W. C.
Board of Directors, Congressional Room, Hotel Statler, courtesy
of McCall’s Magazine.
4:30-6:00 p.m. Tour of Homemakers Exposition, Mezzanine, Stat
ler Hotel.
5:00-6:00 p.m. Open House for Eastern Region delegates, G. F.
W. C. Headquarters, 1734 N street N.W.
6:30 p.m. Past State Presidents' dinner, Statler Hotel.
Houston Opens First
Educational TV Station
By tha Aisociatad Praia
HOUSTON. Tex., May 26.
After a month of delays caused
by late-arriving equipment, the
world's first educational televi
sion station, the University of
Houston's KUHT, VHF Channel 8,
made its first telecast yesterday.
After playing the station’s
theme—the school’s alma mater
—Announcer Mickey Thomas, a
sophomore, read the official sign
on of KUHT.
Then George Arms, producer
director acting as master of cere
monies for the first show, wel
comed viewers informally. The
station went on with 15,000 watts
videa power and 7,500 of audio.
Princess on Crew
Os Trans-Atlantic Ship
By the Aisociatad Prau
NEW YORK, May 26. —lt’s
not at all unusual for a trans-
Atlantic liner to bring European
royalty to New York.
But there was something dif
ferent about the arrival yester
day of Princess Sonia Doria
d’Angri of Naples, aboard the
Italian liner Vulcania.
She was a member of the crew,
making her first trip as the
liner’s social director.
j Phone Orders j
I (Daily 7:30 to S) (Closed May 30)
H RUCKER LUMBER I
II 1
j 1320 Wilson Blvd. JAekson 4-1234 j
Northern Baptists Med
To Pledge Abstinence
By Hso Associotad Pros
DENVER, May 26.—An appeal
for Northern Baptists to pledge
total abstinence from liquor was
in the record today as the Ameri
can Baptist Convention waded
through a crowded final day’s
schedule.
The call for a ban on liquor
was made in one of a score of
resolutions adopted yesterday by
the 3,361 delegates to the 46th
annual assembly of the church.
It was directed-especially to chil
dren and young people.
Among other policy statements
were expressions of continued op
position by the Northern Bap
tists to universal military train
ing and a stand against any
Government financial aid to pa
rochial schools.
Formal election of Dr. Winfield
Edson, 45-year-old pastor of the
First Baptist Church in Long
Beach, Calif., as the new presi
dent of the American Baptist'
Convention was part of the
scheduled business. He was nom
inated without opposition yester
day to take over that office from.
John A. Dawson, Chicago invest
ment firm executive.
Belfrage, Awaiting
Deportation, Divorced
By th« Associated Press
NEW YORK, May 26.—Mrs.
Mary Beatrice Belfrage was
granted an interlocutory divorce
yesterday from Cedric Henning
Belfrage, editor of the weekly
periodical National Guardian,
j Mr. Belfrage, a Briton, is
awaiting deportation after re
| fusing to answer questions of two
! congressional committees inves
, tigating communism.
The decree becomes final in
90 days. Adultery is the sole
ground for divorce in New York
State.
Peru Plans Packing Plants
Peru may install a chain of
meat-packing plants to solve its
meat shortage problem, Lima
reports.
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P. J. NEE CO. OPEN MOW, and THURS. MIGHTS TILL 9
D. C. Gets First Supply Os Gamma GfobulTß
The first official allotment of
gamma globulin, amounting to
300 cubic centimeters, has been
received by the District Health
Department from the Office of
Defense Mobilization.
Dr. Daniel L. Seckinger, di
rector of public health, said the
District is scheduled to get a
total of 6,100 cubic centimeters
for use against polio during the
summer.
Gamma globulin will be dis
tributed to physicians on their
request from three distributing
centers, located at Children’s
firifijt
ssir.iS"
fOHT “
,„d h'» wl,h
camdi co*nz
the sumhysioers
’idm on
CONNECTICUT AVENUE AT WOODLEY ROAD
Hospital, Gallinger Hospital and
the Bureau of Vital Statistics.
One case of polio has been re
ported so far this season in the
District. Gamma globulin was
injected into the family contacts
of the case from a supply the
: Health Department had on
! hand.
i
Woman Dies at 103
Mrs. Margaret Boyle, oldest
woman in Northern Ireland, who
returned there some years ago
after spending 30 years in the
United States, died in Belfast
at 103.

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