OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 26, 1953, Image 43

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1953-05-26/ed-1/seq-43/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for C-4 **

C-4 **
THE EVENING STAR, Washington, D. C.
TUESDAY. MAT Mi IMS
Yesterday's Major League Box Scores
Red Sox, 14; Yanks, 10 j
Boston. A H.O.A. New York. A H O.A. j
Piersall rs 6 3 3 0 Rizzuto.ss 2 12 3
Baker,2b 3 18 2 Martin.2b 3 15 1
Kell.3b 6 12 2 •‘Carey 0 O 0 o!
Gernert.lb 313 1 Bauer.rf 621 1 i
Btephens.il 3 2 10 Mantle.cf 4 3 3 0 i
•Evers.lf 3 2 4 0 McDg d.3b 6 2 14 1
TJmphl t.cf 3 2 2 0 Woodlg.ll 6 2 3 1 !
Bolling.ss 4 114 Berra.c 5 0 3 2 1
Niarhos e 5 3 3 0 Collins.lb 3 O 9 1 |
McDrm't.p 4 4 0 0 Blackwl.p O o 0 0 ■
Kinder p 1 0 O O Gorman.p O O ii O \
freeman. p 0 0 0 0 (Mize 10 O il
Kennedy.p 00 0 0 McDon'd p 1 O O 1 1
Kuzava.p o o O 2 |
tßenna 110 0.
Miller.p 0 0 0 0!
INoren 1 0 0 0;
Ford.p 0 0 0 1;
HBollweg 110 0!
Totals 43 20 27 f» Totals 42 13 27 17
•Singled for Stephens In sth.
’Grounded out for Gorman in 2d.
{Singled for Kuzava In 6th
JFiled out for Miller in <th.
'Singled for Ford in 9th.
••Ran for Martin In 9th.
Boston 210 251 210—14
New York . 012 004 012—10
Runs—Piersall (31, Baker (2». Ger- ;
n»rt- Evers. Umphlett, Niarhos (31 Me- |
Dermott (3). Rizzuto (2), Martin. Bauer j
(21. Mantle. MrDougald. Collins. Renna. i
Bollmeg. Srrors—Bolling. Gernert. Me- |
Dougald. Berra. Runs batted in—Evers ,
(2>, Kell (2i. Stephens (2). Piersall j
(2i, McDctmott (2). Bolling. Bauer (2).
McDousald (2). Collins. Martin. Mantle
(•'!> Two-base hits—McDermott. Pier
gall, Bolling. Three-base hit—Niarhos. j
Home runs—Piersall, Mantle. Sacrifice
-—Bolling. Left on bases —Boston, 9;
New York. 14. Bases on balls—Off Me- |
Dermott. 4: off Kinder. 4: off Blackwell. ■
1; off Gorman. 1: off McDonald. 1; off
Kuzava. 2: off Miller. 1. Struck out—By
McDermott, 2: by Kinder. 1: by Gorman,
1 : by McDonald, 1; by Ford. 1. Hits—;
Off McDermott. 9 in s’j innityts; off
Kinder. 4 in 3 innings: off Freeman, 0 in
v, lnnina: off Kennedy. 0 in Is inning;
off Blackwell. 2 in ‘s inning: off Gor
man 3 in l 2 s innings: off McDonald. 7 i
in 2’s innings: off Kuzava, 4 in l a s
innings: off Miller. 2 in 1 inning: off ;
Ford. 2 in 2 innings. Runs and earned
runs—Off McDermott. 7-5: off Kinder. !
3-3: off Freeman. (>-(>: off Kennedy. 0-c: !
off Blackwell. 2-2: off Gorman. 1-1: off j
McDonald. 5-3: off Kuzava. 3-3: off >
Miller. 2-1: off Ford. 1-1. Hit by pitcher
-By Kinder (Martin l . Wild pitch—•
McDermott. Balk Kinder Winning
pitcher—McDermott (4-4 (.Losing pitcher
McDonald (1-21. Time—3:s2. Attend
ance—2B.37l.
Giants, 6; Pirates, 3
New York. AH O A Pittsburgh. AHO A.
Willms.2b 5 3 2 4 Abrams.rf 4 2 3 (1
Dark.ss 5 2 <1 0 Cst'g ne.lib 4 0 0 4
Th pson.3b 4 2 0 3 (SThomas 1 (1 0 (i
Irvin.rf 32 5 0 Smith lb 4 3112:
•Muel r.rf 2 0 2 0 Kmer.lf 4 13 0
Loekm'n If 5 0 1 0 O Con'! 3b 3 0 4 4
Gilbert.lb 4 1 12 1 Bernier cf 3 0 2 0
Th'mson.cf 4 o l o Sandlo k.c 4 2 3 1;
Noble c 3 14 0 Cole.ss 4 0 1 3
Corwin p 2 0 0 0 Friend p 10 0 3
Hiller.p 110 2 (Metk'vlch 10 0 0
Pollet.p 0 0 0 0
Hetki.p 110 1:
Garagiola 1 o o o i
Totals 38 12 27 10 Totals 35 92718 ;
•Piled out for Irvin In 6th.
tPlted out for Friend In 4th
{Grounded out for Hetki In 9th.
tGrounded into double play for Cas- !
ttglione in 9th.
New York 101 130 000—6
Pittsburgh 000 030 000—3
Runs—Williams (21. Thompson. Irvin.
Gilbert. Noble Abrams. Smith. Kiner.
Error- —Cole Runs batted in—lrvin.
Thomson. Noble. Williams. Dark, Kiner
(.3 >. Two-base hits—Thompson. Smith.
Gilbert. Three-base hit—Hetki. Home :
run—Kiner. Sacriflee—Corwin. Double ;
play—Thompson to Williams to Gilbert. 1
Left on bases—New York. 10: Pittsburgh, |
8 Bases on balls—Off Friend. 3: off Cor
win. 3. Struck out —By Friend. 2: by
Corwin. 3. Hits—Off Friend. 7 In 4
Innings: off Hetki. 1 in 4 1 , innings: off 1
Hiller 2 in 4 1 .< Innings: off Pollet 4 In I
*» Inning; off Corwin. 7 in 4lnnings.
Runs and earned runs—Off Friend. 3-2:
off Pellet. 3-3: off Hetki. 0-0: off Corwin.
3-3: off Hiller, O-O. Hit by pitcher—
Friend (Noblei. Winning pitcher—Hiller
(2-o>. Losing Ditcher—Friend (1-41.
Time—2:34. Attendance —2.369.
Minor Leagues
By the Associated Press
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE.
Hollywood, 11: Los Angeles, 3.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Minneapolis. .3; Louisville. 2.
St. Paul. 9; Kansas City, 2.
Columbus. 11; Toledo. 5
Charleston. 4: Indianapolis, 3.
INTERNATIONAL LEAP,IE.
Rochester at Buffalo, postponed.
Syracuse. 5: Toronto. 4.
Springfield. 7: Ottawa. 5.
Montreal at Baltimore, postponed.
SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION.
Nashville. 3; Atlanta. 2.
Chattanooga. 4—6; Birmingham. 3—7.
Mobile, fi: Little Rock. 4.
New Orleans. 12; Memphis, 10.
TEXAS LEA GEE.
Dallas. 3; Fort Worth. 1 (in innings).
Tulsa 8: Oklahoma City. 7.
Beaumont. 2: Houston o.
Bhreveport, 6: San Antonio. O.
SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE.
Augusta. 4; Charleston. 3 (13 Innings).
Savannah. 9: Columbus, 6.
Macon. 5: Columbia. 3.
Jacksonville. 3: Montgomery, 1.
EASTERN LEAGUE.
Albany at Scranton, postponed.
Schenectady. 4: Williamsport, l.
Wilkes-Barre at Binghamton, post
poned
Elmira at Reading, postponed.
WESTERN LEAGUE.
Colorado Springs. 7: Denver, 2.
Sioux Citv. 2. Lincoln. 1.
Wichita 7; Omaha. 6
(Only games scheduled.)
Griffs' Records
Batting.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI.PCt.
Shea J 11 71 0 0 1 .636
Hoderlein 2 110 0 0 1 .500
Vernon l3B 23 50 10 2 1 22 .362
Porterfield 28 ■; lo 2 0 2 8 .357
Busbv 145 20 44 1(1 0 423 .303
Jensen 138 24 37 9 5 320 .268
Vollmer _ 1091829 4 O 330 .200
rerwilliger 135 22 35 71 (M 2 .259
Funnels 116 18 30 1 2 015 .259
Masterson 16 1 4 1 0 0 3 .250 ;
Verble 8 2 2 0 0 0 2 .25(1 I
Oldis 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 .250
Sima 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 .250
Grasse 71 517 2 0 2 6 .239
Yost - - 13124 32 4 10 6 .235 i
Wood 3.3 (i 71 (I (» 3 .212 j
Fitz Gerald _ 43 5 8 1 0 0 4 .ISO,
Stobbs 14 1 2 0 0 0 0 .143
Campos 9 0 1 0 0 0 2 .11 1
Marrero 17 2 1 (( o o it .059
Moreno 7 O o o 0 o (1 .00(1
Dixon 5 1 o <• o 0 o .non
Coan 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Pitehir.w.
IP H.BB SO GS.GC.W.L. j
6hea 30>a 20 2(I 114 2 3 0
Moreno 25 23 9 8 11 3 (•
Marrero 48 4118 3<; 6 4 4 2;
Porterfield __ 0.» 0, 20 1 o 8 (> 5 3 ;
Masterson 49 45 24 33 . 3 2 5 :
S’obbs 4 1 44 13 1, . - »
Dixon 3(( 28 1014 1 o o 1
Sima 13 14 7 6 -1 o 1
Schmitz 9 8 3 3 o o o «
Pearce 4 5 3 0 0 0 (I 0
Major League Leaders
By tha Associated Press
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Batting Vernon. Washington. .382;
Kell. Boston. .358; Suder. Philadel
phia. .345: Mantle. New York. .338;
Rosen. Cleveland. .330.
Runs—Mantle. New York. 34: Minoso. j
Chicago 31: Yost. Washington. 28;
Jensen. Washington. 4 Kell. Boston. !
and Vernon. Washington. 23.
Runs batted in — Dropo. Detroit. 31: I
Vollmer. Washington. 30: Mantle. New I
York, and Busby. Washington. 23;
Rosen. Cleveland; Robinson. Philadel- I
phia. and Vernon. Washington. 22. i
Bits—Vernon. Washington. 50: Kuenn.
Detroit. 48: Mantle. New York, and
Busby. Washington 44: Kell. Boston. !
and Philley, Philadelphia, 43.
Doubles—Kell. Boston. 14; Umphlett.
Boston, and Niernan. Detroit. 11 Pox.
Chicago; Vernon and Busby. Washing
ton. 10.
Triples—Jensen. Washington. 5: Philley.
Philadelphia, and W’ertz. St. Louis. 3:
eight players tied with 2 each.
Home runs—Gernert. Boston, and Rosen.
Cleveland. 7; Mantle. New York, and
Zernial. Philadelphia. 6; Lollar. Chi- j
eago; Dobv, Cleveland; Kryhoski and 1
Wert*. St. Louis. 5.
Stolen bases—Minoso. Chicago. 0: Ri- j
vera, Chicago. 7; Philley. Philadelphia. ■
4; six players tied with 3 each.
Pitching—Parnell. Boston, 8-0. l.OOO; j
Dorish. Chicago: Ford and Lopat. New j
York; Stuart. St. Louis; Moreno and :
Shea. Washington, 3-0. 1.000.
Btrlkeouts—pierce. Chicago. 48: Trucks. I
St Louts. 38: Gray, Detroit, and Mas- j
terson. Washington. 33: Shantz. Phil- I
adelphla. 32.
LITTLE SPORT
! Braves, 5-10; Redlegs, 1-3
FIRST GAME.
Cincinnati. A.H.O.A. Milwankea. A.H.O A.
Bridges,2b 3 11 2 Bruton.cf 4 0 6 0
Adams,3b 3 0 1 3 Logan.ss 3 12 4
I Bell.cf 4 10 0 Mat>ws.3b 4 0 0 2
! Gr’ng’ss.lf ♦ 11 n Gordon.ll 3 10 0
I Bork ski.rf 4 0 2 0 Pafko.rf 3 0 3 0
i KlVski.lb 3 0 13 0 Adcock.lb 4 1110
j Seminick.c 4 0 4 1 Dittmer.2b 4 12 3
1- 30 14 Crandall,c 2 12 0
; Chuch.p 1 0 o 1 Liddle.p 2 0 11
: ‘Marshall (1 o 0 O
I Bmlth,p 0 0 0 0
; Collum.p 00 10
Totals 29 324 11 Totals 29 527 10
•Batted lor Church in 7th.
Cincinnati 001 000 000—1
Milwaukee 010 200 20x—5
Runs—Church, Gordon (2). Pafko,
Crandall. Ltddle. Errors—Church. Runs
batted in Adams. Adcock, Dittmer.
Logan (2). Three-base hit—Logan. Sac
rifice—Liddle. Double play—Logan to
Dittmer to Adcock. Left on bases —Cin-
cinnati, 7; Milwaukee, 5. Bases on
balls—Off Church 3; off Liddle. 6. Struck
out —By Church. 2: by Collum. 1; by
! Liddle, 1. Hits—Off Church. 3 in 6
; innings: off Smith. 1 in no inning
I (pitched to 2 in 7th); off Collum, 1 in
! 2 innings. Runs and earned runs—Off
j Church, 3-2: off Smith, 2-2: off Collum.
(•-0; off Liddle, 1-1. Hit by pitcher—
l Church (Pafkoi. Wild pitch—Liddle.
Winning pitcher-—Liddle (2-1). Losing
pitcher—Church (2-3). Time—2:oo.
SECOND GAME.
Cincinnati A.H.O.A. Mllwatkee. A.H.O A.
Bridges.2b 4 0 4 2 Bruton.cf 3 2 2 0
Adams,3b 3 0 13 Logan, ss 4 2 11
Bell.cf 4 14 0 M’th ws.3b 4 2 10
M rshall.rf 4 110 Gordon.lf 4 3 0 0
B k'wski.lf 4 2 10 Pafko.rf 3 0 2 0
Hatton.lb 4 18 0 Adcock.lb 4 2 a 1
Landrith.c 0 0 10 Dittmer.2b 4 12 1
Seminick.c 3 0 3 1 Cooper.c 4 113 1
McMT'n.ss 3 0 1 3 Surkont.p 4 0 10
P kowski.D O 0 O 0
Wehme'r.o 1 (I o 1
Nevel.p 0 O O 0
•Marquis 1 0 0 0
Smith, p 10 0 1
Totals 32 524 11 Totals 34 13274
•Grounded out for Nevel in sth.
: Cincinnati 010 000 002— 3
Milwaukee 601 300 OOx—lo
Runs—Bell. Marshall. Borkowski. Bru
ton (21, Logan (2). Mathews (2). Gor
don (2). Pafko, Adcock. Errors—None.
Runs batted in—Hatton, Borkowski (2).
Mathews (5), Adcock (2). Cooper,
Pafko. Logan. Two-base hits—Borkow
ski. Gordon. Adcock. Bruton. Three-base
hits —Adcock. Gordon. Home runs —Bor-
kowski, Mathews (2). Double plays—
Smith to McMillan to Hatton: McMillan
to Bridges to Hatton. Left on bases—
Cincinnati. 4: Milwaukee. 2. Bases on
balls—Of! Perkowski. 1; off Surkont. 2.
Struck out—By Wehmeier. 2; by Smith.
2; by Surkont. 13. Hits —Off Perkowski.
5 in O innings (pitched to 6 in 1st):
off Wehmeier. 5 in 3’n innings: off
Nevel. 1 In a n Inning: off Smith. 2 in
4 innings. Runs and earned runs—
Off Perkowski. 6-6: off Wehmeier. 4-4;
off Nevel 0-ft: off Smith, n-0: off Sur- ;
kont. 3-3. Hit by pitcher—By Smith
'Bruton'. Winning pitcher—Surkont (6-
Oi Losing pitcher—Perkowski (1-4).
Time —2:06. Attendance. 24.445.
Dodgers, 11; Phils, 9
Brooklyn. A HO A Phlla. A HO A
Gilliam,2b 5 12 2 Gl no,2b-ss 6 0 3 4
Reese.ss 5 2 11 Ashburn.ef 3 2 3 0
Snider.cf 5 2 5 0 Wyr’st’k.lf 5 3 0 0
Robins n.lf 32 3 0 Nirh'son.rf 3 110
Thpson.lf 0 0 0 0 Torgs'n.lb 3 17 1
C'mp'n'la.c 4 3 6 0 Waitkus.lb 2 110
Hodges.lb 5 3 7 (• Burgess.c 5 2 5 2
Cox.:tb 4 2 12 Jones.3b 3 2 4 1;
Furillo.rf. 4 12 0 Lohrke.ss 3 0 2 4
Loes.p 0 0 0 0 J Ennis 10 0 0
•Belardl 10 0 0 Ryan.2b 1 O 0 (1
Wade.p 0 0 0 0 Drews.p 3 0 1 2 j
tShuba 1 0 0 o Kons'nty.p 0 0 0 1
Milliken.p 3 0 0 O IClark 0 0 0 0 ;
Black.p 0 0 0 0 Ridzik.p 0 0 0 0)
ILopata 10 0 0
Totals 40 16 27 6 Totals 39 12 27 15
•Flied out for Loes in 2nd.
tGrounded into double play for Wade
in 4th.
{Filed out for Lohrke in 7th.
SWalked for Konstanty in Bth.
‘ Reached first on error for Ridzik in I
9th.
Brooklyn 020 112 140—11
Philadelphia 303 100 021 — 9
Runs—Gilliam. Reese. Snider (2),
Robinson <3>. Campanella. Hodges, Cox.
Furillo. Ashburn (31. Wyrostek <2l.
Nicholson. Torgeson, Jones. Clark. Errors
—Robinson. Reese. Runs batted in-
Nicholson. Torgeson. Burgess (21. Cox,
Furillo (3), Wyrostek, Hodges (2'. Rob- i
inson (4), Campanella. Waltkus (2), I
Jones. Two-base hits—Ashburn, Torge
son. Cox. Campanella, Reese. Snider.
Three-base hit—Wyrostek. Home runs—
Furillo. Robinson, Campanella, Jones.
Sacrifice —Cox. Double plays—Torgeson
to Lohrke to Drews: Gilliam to Reese to
Hodges; Cox to Gilliam to Hodges. Left
on bases—Brooklyn. 7: Philadelphia. 10.
Bases on balls—Off Drews. 2. off Kon
stanty, 1 : off Wade. 2: off Milliken, 5.
Struck out—By Drews. 1: by Konstanty,
2: by Ridzik, 2; by Loes. 2; by Wade, 2; !
by Milliken. 2. Hits—Off Drews. 10 in j
5 lnninßs; off Konstanty. 6 in 3 innings: |
off Ridzik o in 1 inning; off Loes. 4 in
1 Inning; off Wade. 2 in 2 innings: off I
Milliken. 6 in n'i innings: off Black. 0 i
In a 3 inning Runs and earned runs— ;
Off Drews. 6-6: off Konstanty. 5-5; off I
Ridzik. (i-O; off Loes, 3-3: off Wade. 2-2;
off Milliken. 4-3; off Black. 0-0. Hit by
pitcher—Drews (Robinson'. Winning
pitcher—Milliken (1-0•. Losing pitcher
—Konstanty (3-2). Time—2;69. At
tendance—22.o67.
Cards, 14; Cubs, 3
St. Louis. A H.O A. Chicago. A HO A.
Hemus.ss 5 12 2 Baum tz.rf 52 2 0
Bchd'st.2b 6 4 2 5 Herm'ki.rf 0 0 10
Musial.lf 43 2 0 Miksls.2b 510 2
Slaugh r.rf 4 2 3 0 Ward.lb 4 2 9 0
Jabl’ski.3b 5 0 0 4 Sauer.lf 4 0 3 0
Bilko. lh 5 3 10 0 Atwell.c 4 0 4 0
D Rice c 5 12 0 Jackson.3b 5 J o I
Rep lskt.cf 5 0«0 Smalley.ss 3123,
Presko.p 2 2 0 1 Jeffcoat.cf 3 16 0!
Brazle,p 2 2 0 0 Rush.p 10 0 1
Baczskl.p 0 0 0 0
•Addis 1 0 0 0
Jones.p 0 0 0 0 |
+Cavar>ta 0000
Simpson.p O o o o
Kelly D O O 0 O 1
{Brown 1 0 0 0
Leonard,p 0 0 0 O i
Totals 43 18 27 12 Totals 369 27 7}
•Grounded out for Baczewskl In 4th. i
(Walked for Jones in 6th.
{Flied for Kelly in Bth.
St. Louis 204 002 051—14 \
Chicago 001 100 010— 3 j
Runs—Hemus (2>, Schoendienst (3).
Musial (31. Slaughter (21. Bilko (2),
Brazle (2). Baumholtz. Jackson. Jeffcoat.
Error —Jeffcoat. Runs batted in—Slaugh
ter (2) Bilko (4i. Repulski. Presko.
Sauer, Jackson. Musial (6). Miksls. Two
base hits —Schoendienst. Jackson. Brazle.
Home runs—Jackson. Musial (21. Bilko.
Double plavs—Rush to Smalley to Ward:
Miksls to Smalley to Ward. Left on
bases—St. Louis 8; Chicago. 12. Bases
on balls—Off Rush. 4; off Presxo. 4; off
Simpson. 1 • off Brazle. 2. Struck out
—Bv Rush. 3: by Presko, 2: by Simpson.
1. Hits —Off Rush. 5 in 2's innings: off
Baczewskl. 2 in l*i innings; off Presko,
6in 5 j 3 innings; off Jones, 3in 2 in
nings; off Simpson. 3 in IMi Innings: off
Kelly. ” In I: .i Inning: off Leonard. 3 in
I inning; <ff Brazle 3 in •'t 1 i innings..
Runs and earned runs —Off Rush. 6-«:
off Baczewski. 0-0; off Jones, 2-2: off ;
Presko. 2-2: off Simpson. 3-3: off Kelly, I
2- off Leonard 1-1: off Brazle 1-1.
Hit bv pitcher—By Baczewski islaugh- |
(eri. Passed ball —D. Rice. Winning i
pitcher—Presko (3-3>. Losing pitcher—- 1
Rush (3-si. Time —2:50. Attendance
(paid)—s.3sß.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Bxttinz—Wyrostek. Philadelphia. .370;
Schoendienst, 8t Louis. .363: Ashburn.
Philadelphia. .356: Greenarass. Cin
cinnati. 349: Campanella. Brooklyn.
.333.
Runs—Snider. Brooklyn. 30: Robinson
1 and Campanella. Brooklyn. 29;
Reese Brooklyn. 26: Gtlllam. Brook
i jvn and Dark. New York. 25.
! Runs batted in— Campanella. Brooklyn.
I 47: Mathews. Milwaukee. 30: Irvin.
New York. 29: Snider. Brooklyn. 27:
Kiner, Pittsburgh, and Bilko. St. Louis.
I 26.
Hits—Schoendienst. St. Louis. 49: Cam
-1 panella. Brooklyn; Lockman and Thom-
I son New York. 43; Snider. Brooklyn;
Irvin. New York, and Ashburn. Phila
i delphia. 42.
Doubles—Schoendienst. St. Louis. 14:
Dark. New York. 13; Snider. Brooklyn.
12: Robinson. Brooklyn. 9: Torgeson.
Philadelphia, and D Rice. Bt. Louis. 8.
Triples—Bruton. Milwaukee, and Bernier.
Pittsburgh, 4: Fondy. Chicago, and
Gordon. Milwaukee. 3: 17 players
tied with 2 each.
Home runs—Campanella. Brooklyn. 14:
Kluszewski. Cincinnati, and Mathews.
Milwaukee. 10: Bell. Cincinnati, and
Irvtn, New York. 8.
1 Stolen bases—Gilliam. Brooklyn. 7:
i Snider Brooklyn, and Bruton. Mil
waukee. 6: Reese, Brooklyn. 5; Green
grass. Cincinnati. 4
Pitching—Surkont. Milwaukee. 6-0.
! J.OOo; Stalev. Bt. Louis. 6-1. .857;
Mizell, St. Louis. 4-1. *00: Meyer,
Brooklyn: Spahn. Milwaukee, and Wil
! helm. New York. 3-1, .750.
; Strikpouts—Simmons. Philadelphia. 47:
j Roberts. Philadelphia. 45: Ersklne.
Brooklyn. 42: Mizell. St. Louis, 36:
Maeile. New York, 35.
White Sox, 7; Browns, 5
Chicago. A.H.O.A. St. Louig. A.H.O.A.
Car'q l.ss. 4 12 3 Groth.cf 5 110
Rivera.cf . 5 2 3 0 B’rry,ss-3b 4 10 4
Fain.lb _ 3 18 1 Slevers.lb 2 0 8 0
Mele.rl 5 2 3 0 fKr'skl.lb 115 0
Minoso.lf 30 2 0 Lenh'rdt.ll 20.3 0
Steph’s.3b 5 2 3 4 Moss.c 3 0 2 0
! Lollar.c _. 3 111 {C'rtney.c 2 o 2 0
Fox.2b 5 3 5 4 Elliott.3b 3 2 2 1
Pierce.p _ 2 0 0 0 I'M nda.3b O 0 O 0
Aloma.p 1 (1 O O ' Kokos _ 1 0 O 0
•Clark _ 1 0(»(J H' nter.sa. 0 0 0 1
Donsh.p . 1 0 0 0 Dyck.rf . 4 0 3 0
Young.2b. 3 3 1 2
Trucks.p . 110-1
Blyzka.p _ 0 0 0 0
IWertz.p - 10 0 o
'Cain O 0 o o
White.p _ 0 0 0 0
Stuart.p . 00 0 1
=Edwards 0 O 0 (1
Brecheen.p 1 O (► 0
Paige.p 0 0 0 1
•Larsen.. 10 0 0
Totals 38 12 27 13 Totals 34 9 2# 11
•Struck out for Aloma in Bth.
liSafe on error for Blyzka in 4th.
"Ran for Wertz in 4th.
zrWalked (or Stuart in 6th.
(Walked for Sievers in 6th.
{Filed out for Moss in 6th.
fßan for Elliott in 7th.
out for Miranda In Bth.
•Fouled out for Paige in »th.
Chicago 000 400 021—7
St. Louis 010 201 100—6
I Runs Carrasquel. Mele. Mlnoso.
Stephens. Lollar (2). Fox. Elliott. Ml
! randa. Young (3). Errors —Pierce (2).
! Fox. Runs batted In—Trucks. Stephens
, (2). Lollar, Fox (2). Berry (2>, Groth.
i Lenhardt. Carresquel. Fain. Two-base
hils —Rivera, Young (2), Stephens. Lol
lar. Mele. Fox (2). Carrasquel. Kryhoski.
Sacrifices—Berry. Dyck. Double plays—
! Stephens to Fain: Elliott to Young to
; Sievers; Carresquel to Fox to Fain. Left
on bases—Chicago. 11: St. Louis. 14.
Bases on balls—Off Pierce. 5: off Trucks.
1; off Stuart. 1; off Aloma. 5: off Brech
een. 2: off Paige. 1. Struck out —By
Aloma. 1: by Stuart. 1; by Brecheen, 1:
by Paige. 1. Hits—Off Trucks. sin 3 a a
innings; off Blyzka. 0 In 'a Inning: off
Stuart. 1 In 2 Innings; off White, o In 9
Innings (pitched to one batter): off
Pierce. 4 in 4 innings (faced one bat
ten: in sth: off Brecheen. 5 in l a 3 in
nings: off Aloma. 3 In 3 Innings: off
Paige. 1 In I'j innings; off Dorlsh. 2 in
2 innings Runs and earned runs—Off
Trucks. 4-4: off Blyzka. 0-0: off White.
10-0; off Pierce. 3-1; off Aloma. 2-2; off
Stuart. 0-0: off Brecheen. 2-2; off Paige.
1-1; off Dorlsh. 0-0. Hit by pitcher—By
White iCarrasquelc by Stuart (Lollarl.
Balk, by Aloma. Winning pitcher, Aloma
(2-0). Losing pitcher—Brecheen (0-6).
Time—3:l7. Attendance—4.ll4.
Welfare-Recreation
Conference Planned
Thursday Morning
The annual Health, Welfare
and Recreation Conference in
augurated three years ago by
United Community Services will
be held at 10 a.m. Thursday in
the Shoreham Hotel.
There will be four simultane- !
ous sessions, followed by a lunch
eon at which Sir Roger Makins,
British Ambassador, will speak, j
The conference is designed to
bring information on health and
welfare problems to the citizens
of Washington.
A session on "Children in Con- I
flict With the Law” will hear A.
Murray Preston, chairman of the
UCS committee on juvenile de
linquency; Mrs. Henry Grattan
Doyle, former chairman of the
Juvenile Court Advisory Com
mittee; Dr. Victor J. Tulane,
; chairman of the UCS corrections’
section, and Walter Washington
and Thomas C. Smith, members
of the UCS juvenile delinquency j
committee.
Problems of Aging.
A "Problems of the Aging”
meeting includes these speakers:
Miss Ann McCorry of the De
-1 partment of Health, Education
and Welfare Committee on Aging
and Geriatrics; Glenn L. Mc-
Laughlin, of the economics de
partment of the Export-Import
Bank of Washington: Miss Mar
garet O'Donoghue, Washington
International Center; John Ihl
der, former executive director of'
the National Capital Housing
Authority, and Dr. Alma J.
Speer, physician.
"What to Do About Emotion
ally Disturbed Children" will be !
discussed by Dr. George S. Ste
venson, consultant of the Na
j tional Association for Mental
Health; Mrs. Bessie Cramer, di
rector of elementary special
services in the public schools; '
Mrs. Christopher Granger, mem- i
ber of the board of Hillcrest!
Children’s Village; W. Thacher;
Winslow, member of a UCS j
l committee on public welfare
services, and the Rev. Maynard
Catchings. member of the Dis
trict Board of Public Welfare.
Prentiss to Preside.
Brig. Gen. Louis W. Prentiss,
Engineer Commissioner, will
preside over a session on “The
Human Element in the $335
Million Public Works Program.”
This meeting will be held in the
auditorium of St. Thomas j
Apostle Church, Twenty-seventh
street and Woodley road N.W.
Speakers will include John A. I
Reilly, president of the Second 1
i National Bank; District Welfare
Director Gerard M. Shea; Pub
lic Health Director Daniel L.
Seckinger, and Recreation Supt.
Milo F. Christiansen.
Awards Presented
By Sigma Delta Chi
By th* Associated Press
CHICAGO, May 26.—Medal
lions and plaques honoring dis
tinguished service to journalism
in 1952 were presented last night
to 14 winners of Sigma Delta
j Chi national awards.
The presentations were made
by Lee Hills, executive editor of
the Detroit Free Press and na
tional president of the profes
sional journalistic fraternity.
More than 500 newsmen attended
the banquet for the winners of
awards given annually since
1935.
Among those who received
awards either in person or
through representatives were:
Chalmers M. Roberts, The
Washington Post, for general re
porting.
Charles and Eugene Jones,
NBC, for radio and TV report
ing. The brothers formerly
Air Force Discloses
Secrets of Giant
B-36-H to Reporters
By Harry Lever
Star Staff Cerr*ipend*nt
CARSWELL AIR FORCE
BASE, Tex., May 26.—Many of
the long-kept secrets of the
B-36H, 10-engined intercon
tinental bomber—largest in the
world—can now be made known,
known.
For the first time, the Air
Force has permitted a handful
of reporters to fly simulated
radar and visual bomb runs
aboard the heretofore heavily
restricted heavy bomber, which
for a long time to come will be
the Sunday punch of the
Strategic Air Command. The
only things not shown were the
still secret bomb sight and the
ways in which enemy communi
cations can be jammed.
I was among a group of news
men who made a nine-hour tac
tical bombing mission aboard
the $3.5 million ship, with the
flight originating and ending at
this base —home of the B-36H.
We "bombed” Dallas and several
other Southwest cities at alti
tudes ranging from 10,000 to
nearly 25,000 feet.
230-Foot Wingspan.
The first impression one gets
of the bomber is backed up by
its impressive specifications. Its
weight is about 358,000 pounds.
Its wingspan is 230 feet. The air
plane is 162 feet long and nearly
47 feet high.
The B-36H, the latest model
ot the B-36 type in existence, has
six Pratt & Whitney 3,800-
horsepower propeller-driven
pusher engines, and four Gen
eral Electric J-47 jet engines of,
5.200 pounds thrust each. This
gives the bomber about 45,000-
horsepower, which can drive it
more than 435 miles an hour.
The propellers are a massive
19 feet in diameter. The B-36H
can carry 30,000 gallons of fuel,
has a nonstop range of 10,000
miles with 10,000 pounds of 1
bombs, or half that distance with
84,000 pounds.
The tremendous horsepower
was evident to our group as we ;
listened to a 35-minute engine
check over the intercom system.
Before the engine warmup, Lt.
Col. Artist Prichard, the aircraft
commander, and his 15-man
crew had checked the B-36H in
other ways. Col. Prichard, who is
with SAC s 7th Bomb Group, is
only 30, but he already has more
than 2,700 hours in the B-36H.
Maj. George A. Marshall, first
flight engineer, announced:
"Power is set across the board.!
Ready to go.”
The B-36H cleared about 2,-
500 feet of Carswell’s 8.500 feet
runway before it became air
borne. Then Col. Prichard gave
the order to cut in the jets, on
pods far out on the wings. At
once there was a tremendous
surge, as the bomber climbed at:
a steep angle. Whatever was'
loose in the cockpit flew through '
the air. The newsmen required
all their strength to hang on.
An altitude of about 25,000
feet was reached in about 40
minutes, and the jets were cut
off. The long vapor trails they
made in the sky swiftly disap
peared. At altitudes of more
than 40,000 feet, the jet engines
are more efficient than the pis
ton engines, but they are mostly
used for the takeoffs and land
ings. Their fuel lasts 20 hours.
Bombing by Radar.
After some flying at about 25,-
000 feet, over several Texas cities,
the bomber dropped down to
about 10,000 feet at the begin
ning of the fifth hour. Its pri
mary mission was to “bomb” Dal
las by radar.
Several times, the B-36H ap
proached Greenville, Tex., its
"IP,” or initial - point about 37 !
miles from Dallas. It made test
runs between the two places,
testing wind direction, establish
ing a bombing pattern, checking
ground speed and so on. Theo
retically, it was out of sight at j
about 40,000 feet and using radar, ‘
but the idea was to give the peo- j
pie on the ground a chance to
see the ship on a bomb run.
When the test runs were com
pleted towards the eighth hour,
the radar bombardier, Lt. Col. I
Earl H. Yaden, said he was ready, t
The objective was the Ford Mo- :
tor Co. plant in Dallas. The!
B-36H made for the IP and there
completed a 180-degree turn. It
started on the bomb run.
As it neared Dallas. Col. Prich
ard called tersely over the in
tercom :
"20 seconds ... 10 seconds .. .
five seconds . . .
"Bombs away!”
Mission Accomplished.
When the B-36H landed, it was
learned there had been a toler
ance of only a few seconds either
way, which meant, in effect, that
tne automobile plant theoreti
cally, was no more. Brig Gen.
Joe William Kelly, acting com
mander of the Eighth Air Force
at Carswell, expressed his pleas
ure at this accuracy.
The reporters were given a
:hance to fly the giant, under the
tutelage of Capt. Joseph G. Soic,
co-pilot. I was at the controls
for about three minutes, and
then the airplane began to yaw
a little. Not being a pilot by
trade, I glanced uneasily at
Capt. Soic, and with a look that
bordered on sympathetic sorrow,
he took over again..
worked for the Washington
Times-Herald.
Virginius Dabney, Richmond
(Va.) Times-Dispatch, for edi
torial writing.
Clark R. Mollenhoff, Des
Moines Rgister and Tribune and
Minneapolis Star and Tribune,
for Washington correspondence.
** > v
J m -j*
ATOMIC SHELL FIRE—Las Vegas, Nev.—Official observers
(foreground) watch the atomic cloud rise from the first
atomic shell burst. The nuclear missile, fired from the United
States 280-millimeter cannon, explodes 500 feet above a
target on Frenchman Flat, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas.
—AP Wirephoto.
Atomic Cannon Takes
Established Part in
U. 5. Defense Plans
By the Associated Press
LAS VEGAS, Nev., May 26.
The atomic cannon is an estab
lished reality today in America's
defense plans. Nuclear scientists
have compressed the virtual
equivalent of a standard A-bomb
into a shell only 11 inches in
diameter.
i These appear to be the princi
: pal results of yesterday's highly
successful first firing of a nuclear
shell from the Army’s 280-milli
meter gun.
But scientists of the Atomic
Energy Commission are not re
laxing, although the 10th and
last scheduled test of the 1953
spring series is over. With the
plaudits of defense leaders and
legislators ringing in their ears,
the AEC technicians are discus
sing plans for still another test
within the next month at Nevada
Proving Grounds.
Fare Another Problem.
Test Director Carroll L. Tyler
will not disclose the nature of
the experiment under considera
tion. but indicates there is one
more problem Dr. Alvin C.
! Graves, scientific chief, and hgs
aides wish to solve before going
back to the nuclear workshop at
Los Alamos, N. Mex.
There is hardly anything short
of the hydrogen bomb, however,
which could impress observers
| more than this historic cannon
1 shot which whistled 7 miles
across Frenchman Flat and ex
i ploded with A-bomb brilliancy at
! 500-foot elevation.
The blast snapped off 50-foot
1 trees and flipped railroad box
cars and Army tanks like toys,
reports from viewers indicated.
The full effects on various types
of army construction, materiel
, and clothing will be the subject
of study for weeks.
Some 2.525 troops came
through maneuvers without re
ported injury following the blast.
A flight of 12 B-36 bombers from
j Carswell, N. Mex., Air Force Base
i roared over the site. More than
j 20.000 armed forces men re
| ceived atomic training on land
or in the air during the spring
series.
Play’s Hob with Air Traffic.
The-blast’s radioactive cloud,
scooting northeast with a high
wind, played hob with air traf
fic in parts of Nevada, Utah.
Wyoming, Montana and Idaho
for five hours.
The Civil Aeronautics Ad
ministration in Salt Lake City
asked pilots to ground their
planes or take routes to avoid
the cloud area. The request was
withdrawn when all areas were
certified safe.
The nuclear shell, described
as less than three feet long and
weighing about 1,000 pounds,
caused no damage to the giant
cannon, it was indicated. The
| projectile, which takes its place
|in the Nation’s fast-growing
stockpile of atomic weapons, was
termed “a concentrated capsule
of what once filled an entire
bomb bay.”
This phrase was used by Rep
resentative Cole, chairman of
the Joint Atomic Energy Com
| mittee, in summing up the gen
eral views of 79 congressmen
who watched the test. “A mar
velous new gadget,” Mr! Cole
concluded.
Diana Lynn Asks Divorce
SANTA MONICA, Calif., May
26 </P).—Actress Diana Lynn, 26.
filed suit yesterday for divorce
from John C. Lindsay, architect.
She asked Superior Court for
approval of a property agreement
already reached and "for such
other §.‘lief as the court may see
fit.” A
Cottage City PTA to Meet
The Cottage City (Md.) School |
PTA will meet at 8 o'clock to
night in the school. A safety
film will be shown.
LEE TIRES
GUARANTEED
AGAINST ALL ROAD-HAZARD DAMAGE
LEE STAGHOUNP TIRES
Regular You S*i
Size Price Each Tire Save I^#
6.00-16 $14.60 $11.95 $2.65 6.70-1 S
6.70-15 $16.55 $13.95 $2.60
_________________AN prk«i plus tax and old
plui tax your old Hro reieppohle eaedWae.
We'll pay up to *6.60 for your old tires
when you replace with LEE SUPER DE LUXE
The finest tires made by Lee of Comho-
hocken. Built so extra strong, so extra
safe, we can guarantee them against /
all road-hazard damage for 15 months. /
Lifetime Guarantee on quality of mate- /
and workmanship. / y ||g|||KHPHu^BKß
trad*-in allowances upon
your
SEE YOUR LOCAL LEE DEALER
Acme Tire Shop Powhoton Electric Co., Inc. Mac's Esso Station
722 N. Henry St., 1340 Powhoton St., 3150 Mt. Pleosont St. N.W., •
Alexandria, Vo. Alexandria, Vo. Washington, D. C.
0 ’ I"* Romsey's Service Station University Esse Service
ll Ll K IT 601 K St. N.W., 21st 4 Pa. Ave. N.W.,
Horry Sellers ‘ Washington, D. C. Washington. D. C.
1101 Uth St. S.E., McMillan's Service Station Altemus Esso Service Center
Washington, D. C. 6*85 N. Fairfax Drive 3745 Kensington-Wheoton Rd.,
W'lls, Inc. Arlington, Vo. Kensington, Md.
Annandale, Vo.
Gouldin's Esse Service Center W. M. Flinchum & Sons Pyles Motor Co., Ine
3900 Nichols Ave. S.W., 3290 Queens Chapel Rd., 3600 trench Ave. S.E.,
Washington, D. C. Hyattsville, Md. Silver Hill, Md.
IF NO LEE DEALER NEAR YOU, CALL LEE TIRE FACTORY BRANCH
627 K Stroot h.W., Washington NA. 8-7241
31 Students at GWU
Presented Annual
Award of Honors
Awards were presented to 31
students of George Washington
University yesterday during the
annual award of honors cere
mony at Lisner Auditorium.
Commencement week will be
climaxed by the presentation of
degrees to 900 students at 8 p.m.
tomorrow in the university yard.
Alumni to be honored are Miss
Elsie E. Green for achievement in
medicine.
Listing of Awards.
Special awards went to;
Dinu Alexandrescu Muresianu.
the S3OO Alexander Wilbourne
Weddell Award for the best es
say on world peace; Allen M.
Renard, Burns Organic Chem
istry Award; Sister Mary Mat
thias Zimmerman, Alpha Zeta
Omega pharmacy award; Arnold
N. Barr, Robert C. Knowles and
Jerome H. Logan, Alpha Chi
Sigma freshman chemistry
awards; Joel Selbin, Alpha Chi
Sigma senior chemistry award.
Robert D. Buzzell, Alpha
Kappa Psi commerce award: Mr.
Selbin, American Institute of
Chemists Award; Gustav G.
Koustenis, Martin L. Cannon
Memorial Pharmacy Award:
Vivian C. Pear, Chi Omega social
sciences award; Mr. Buzzell and
Hugh W. Olds. jr„ John Henry
Cowles Government Award;
Joseph E. Flynn, Dewitt Clinton
Croissant Award for essay on
drama; Andrew T. A. MacDon
ald. E. K. Cutter Award in Eng
lish.
John G. Fletcher, Delta Zeta
Award in Zoology; Marvin C.
Soffen, Ellsworth Prize in Pat
ent Law; James F. Merow. Josh
ua Evans 111 Prize in Political
and Social Sciences: Mr. Selbin.
Willie E. Fitch Award in Chem
istry.
William N. Early, Alice Doug
las Goddard Award in American
Literature; Anne C. Russell. Ed
ward Carrington Award in
French; Frederick S. Firnbachcr,
James Douglas Goddard Award
in Pharmacy.
Others Listed.
Mr. Buzzell, Morgar Richard
son Goddard Award in Com
merce; Mrs. Margaret B. Wood,
Gardiner G. Hubbard Award in
United States History; Anna
Aylaian, Kappa Kappa Gamma
Award in Botany; John D. Ea-
82,669 in D.C. Area
Called Delinquent
In Federal Taxes
By th* Atiociotod Pr»»»
BALTIMORE, May 26.—Mori
than a million people owe the
Government $856 million in taxes
and many of the delinquents are
Government employes, the Eve
ning Sun said.
An article by John T. Ward
reported that on March 31 there
were 1,179,454 delinquent tax ac
counts totaling $856,949,086. That
is an all-time high and more
than enough to pay a month's
interest on the entire national
debt.
The delinquent figures are for
1951 and before. The Govern
ment can’t collect income taxes
due for longer than six years.
The newspaper said that 82,-
669 delinquent income tax ac
counts amounting to $17,317,000
were in Washington and the two
adjacent Maryland counties df
Prince Georges and Montgom
ery, where many Government
workers live. It estimated that
at least half of the total money
due in that area was owed by
Federal employes.
The Evening Sun said the
Government can’t attach pay
checks of its employes as it can
other taxpayers.
In all of Maryland there are
45.014 accounts with $24,666,349
due in taxes.
ton, John Bell Larner Award to
law school graduate with highest
scholastic standing: David J.
Pillow. John Ordronaux Award
to medical school graduate with
highest standing; Samuel J.
Keyser, Phi Eta Sigma freshman
award for scholarship.
Barbara F. Sache. Phi Sigma
Kappa, freshman award for ora
tory; Robert C. Fulcher, jr., and
Mary M, Wilkinson, Psi Chi
awards in psychology; Leo J.
Schkolnick, Ruggles award in
mathematics; Mr. Barr, Sigma
Kappa award in chemistry; Mr.
Fletcher. James Mcßride Ster
rett, jr., award in physics: James
A. Robinson, Charles Swisher
award in medieval history;
Claude M. Schonberger, Thomas
G. Walsh award for an essay on
Irish history, and Phyllis V.
Hards, Jesse Frederick Essay
prize in journalism.

xml | txt